Any student enrolled in a UW–Madison doctoral program can pursue a doctoral minor in human development and family studies. The graduate program in HDFS, located within the School of Human Ecology, offers courses on individual and family development throughout the lifespan and across ecological settings. These courses focus on a range of topics, including risk and resilience throughout the life span, competent child rearing, positive development, poverty and the family, mindfulness and contemplative practices for child and family well-being, development in multicultural contexts, policy, adult development and relationships, adolescence, and aging and the family. Courses that address the applications of research to practice are also part of the curriculum. Recent offerings include courses in prevention science, family policy, evidence-based intervention, and bridging the gap between research and practice. Reflecting the multidisciplinary orientation of the program, faculty and students employ a wide array of methods in their work. Faculty possess expertise in areas as diverse as longitudinal modeling, community-based research, interpretive interviewing, program evaluation, observational methods, survey methodology, action research, and ethnography. The program explicitly values both qualitative and quantitative methods. For more information, see this link.

(Must comply with Graduate School Policy for Option A Minors.)
The HDFS doctoral minor requires at least 9 credits of HDFS coursework, with no more than 3 credits below the 700 level. HDFS courses that are cross-listed with another department should be taken as an HDFS course. Students must receive a grade of B or better in each course. 

Graduate students interested in pursuing an Option A doctoral minor should complete the minor agreement form available on the HDFS website and consult with the chair of the graduate program, who will help them identify an HDFS faculty member to serve as their faculty advisor.