The Guide contains information about the many academic programs that make the University of Wisconsin–Madison one of the world's foremost institutions of higher education.

The Guide is published online only. It is not available in printed format.

The information in the Guide applies to all undergraduate students at the university regardless of their classification (school/college affiliation). Information in the individual school/college sections applies specifically to students who intend to graduate from one of those schools or colleges.

It is important for students to be familiar with all the information that applies to them. Students are strongly encouraged to consult their advisors at least once each semester to be certain they are completing requirements that apply to their degree and major programs.

The Guide is intended to complement other university information including specific materials supplied by schools, colleges, departments, and programs.

For more information about admission expectations, academic preparation, the application process, and important dates and deadlines, contact:

Office of Admission and Recruitment
702 West Johnson Street, Suite 1101
Madison, WI 53715-1007
onwisconsin@admissions.wisc.edu
608-262-3961

Schedule a campus at VisitBucky or call 608-262-3318.

UW–Madison summer brochures and program information are available from the Division of Continuing Studies.

All entering students, to protect their interests, should become well acquainted with the regulations regarding student academic and nonacademic misconduct. Information about the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, as amended, is distributed during Wisconsin Welcome and is available at:

Office of the Registrar
333 East Campus Mall #10101
Madison, WI 53715-1384

Accreditation

The University of Wisconsin–Madison is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission

230 South Lasalle Street, Suite 7-500
Chicago, IL 60604
Telephone 1-800-621-7440
www.hlcommission.org

UW–Madison, which was first accredited in 1913, was last accredited in 2009, and will go through a reaccreditation process again in 2018–19.

Registration with Minnesota Office of Higher Education

The University of Wisconsin-Madison is a public institution registered as a "Private Institution" with the Minnesota Office of Higher Education pursuant to sections 136A.61 to 136A.71. Registration is not an endorsement of the institution. Credits earned at the institution may not transfer to all other institutions.

Affirmative Action and Compliance Statement

The University of Wisconsin–Madison is committed to providing equal opportunity and equal access and to complying with all applicable federal and state laws and regulations and University of Wisconsin System and university non-discrimination policies and procedures. For information on all covered bases, the names of the Title IX and Americans with Disabilities Act Coordinators, and the processes for how to file a complaint alleging discrimination, please contact the Office of Compliance. The Office of Compliance is located at 361 Bascom Hall, 500 Lincoln Drive, Madison WI 53706 and can be reached at Voice: 608-265-6018 (relay calls accepted); Fax: 608 263-4725; Email: uwcomplianceoffice@wisc.edu.

The following are the nondiscrimination bases for covering students and applicants for admission to the university; university employees and applicants for employment at the university; and those wishing to take part in university programs and activities, including visitors to campus.

Students/Educational Programs

  • age
  • ancestry
  • color
  • creed
  • disability
  • ethnicity (specifically involving harassment by UW employees)
  • gender identity or expression
  • marital or parental status
  • national origin
  • pregnancy
  • race
  • religion
  • retaliation for opposing discrimination, making a complaint of discrimination or taking part in an investigation relating to discrimination
  • sex
  • sexual orientation
  • or any other category protected by law, including physical condition or developmental disability as defined in Wisconsin Statutes§51.01(5).

Employees/Applicants 

  • age
  • ancestry
  • arrest record
  • color
  • conviction record
  • creed
  • disability
  • ethnicity (specifically involving harassment by university employees)
  • gender identity or expression
  • genetic information including genetic testing
  • honesty testing
  • marital or parental status
  • military service
  • national origin
  • pregnancy
  • race
  • religion
  • retaliation for opposing discrimination, making a complaint of discrimination or taking part in an investigation relating to discrimination
  • sex
  • sexual orientation
  • use or nonuse of lawful products off the employer’s premises during nonworking hours,
  • veteran status
  • declining to attend a meeting or participate in any communication about religious matters or political matters, or any other category protected by law

Visitors and Program Participants/University Activities

  • age
  • ​ancestry
  • color
  • creed
  • disability
  • national origin
  • race
  • retaliation for making a complaint of discrimination, or taking part in an investigation relating to discrimination, or opposing discrimination
  • sex
  • sexual orientation

Also covered is any other non-discrimination category that may be subsequently added, even if not included in the above list, as a result of federal or State of Wisconsin court, legislative, or regulatory action, or action taken by UWS or the University.

INFORMATION FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES

The McBurney Disability Resource Center provides disability-related services and accommodations to undergraduate, graduate, professional, Special, and guest students. The center works closely with students and faculty on the provision of reasonable accommodations to ensure access to the learning environment. Common accommodations include extended time and/or small group environment for exams, class notetakers, sign language interpreting, real time and media captioning, and conversion of printed materials to an accessible format. McBurney staff members also collaborate with students and faculty to determine reasonable flexibility with regard to attendance, participation, and deadlines for disorders that fluctuate in severity over the course of enrollment. The center makes referrals to other campus offices or community resources for nonclassroom accommodations related to housing, transportation, personal care needs, and so on. Students should contact the center upon admission to begin the eligibility for services process. Early notice is essential in order to have accommodations in place prior to the start of the semester. For detailed information, see How to Become a McBurney Client.

McBurney Disability Resource Center
702 West Johnson Street, Suite 2104
Madison, WI 53706
608-263-2741 (voice)
608-225-7956 (text)
608-265-2998 (fax)
mcburney@studentlife.wisc.edu
www.mcburney.wisc.edu

The information, policies, and rules contained herein are subject to change. No part of this publication should be construed as a contract or offer to contract. The information in this catalog is current as of June 1, 2017. Later revisions are announced through department or program offices. Students are responsible for knowing current university regulations. University offices can provide current information about possible changes.

Office of Admissions and Recruitment

Students seeking to earn a bachelor’s degree from the University of Wisconsin–Madison will apply for admission through the Office of Admissions and Recruitment. Undergraduate admission is competitive and selective; professional admissions counselors review applications using a holistic process. We focus on academic excellence, reviewing high school and college coursework (when applicable), the courses students have chosen to take, the rigor and breadth of the curriculum, and how the student has performed in their coursework. We also consider written essays, letters of recommendation, and extracurricular involvement.

Our review process is designed to help us identify students who are not only academically stellar but also have qualities such as leadership, concern for humanity, and achievement in the arts, athletics, and other areas. We also seek diversity in personal background and experience for potential contribution to the University of Wisconsin–Madison community.

We invite and encourage all students considering the University of Wisconsin–Madison to join us on campus for a tour. There are many options to explore and discover what UW–Madison has in store.

Apply

To submit an application for admission review the application dates and deadlines as well as the required application materials listed on our website.

Dates and Deadlines
Freshman Applicants
Transfer Applicants
Reentry Applicants

Freshmen

Competitive freshman applicants have taken advantage of the rigor offered at their high schools, performed well in challenging courses, and have strong ACT or SAT scores. Beyond academic excellence we are looking for students who demonstrate leadership, community engagement, and passion.

Students are considered freshman applicants if they have not yet completed high school (secondary-level education); have not earned a GED/HSED (but will by the time they enroll at UW–Madison); or have not enrolled in a college or university in a degree-granting program since graduating high school or earning a GED/HSED. For more information about admission requirements and expectations of freshman applicants please see our website.

Transfer Students

Successful transfer applicants will have a consistently high or upward grade trend; a strong cumulative grade point average; and rigorous coursework in English composition, college-level math, science, social science, humanities, literature, and foreign language. Admission to the university does not guarantee acceptance to an intended major, which is a separate process from the undergraduate admission process.

Students are considered transfer applicants if they have enrolled in an accredited college or university in a degree-granting program after graduating from high school or earning a GED/HSED. Students must have 24 transferable credits earned at a college or university after high school graduation to be eligible for admission as a transfer applicant. For more information about admission requirements and expectations of transfer applicants please see our website.

Prospective transfer students can begin satisfying UW–Madison general education and degree requirements before transferring. For more information on selecting courses for the purpose of satisfying UW–Madison requirements, see Transfer Admissions. Transfer credit is generally given for college-level courses taken at a degree-granting institution accredited by a CHEA-recognized organization. Courses must be similar in nature, level, and content to UW–Madison undergraduate courses and apply to a UW–Madison academic program. Students may wish to consult the UW–Madison Transfer Credit Policy for more details.

Reentering Students

Students previously registered at UW–Madison in an undergraduate degree program who wish to resume undergraduate study after an absence of a semester or more are considered reentry students. Reentry students must file an application for readmission but are not subject to the application fee.

To guarantee an early enrollment appointment time, reentry students should submit the complete application by February 1 for the fall term or by October 1 for the spring term. In addition to submitting an application, reentry applicants must submit official transcripts for any work completed elsewhere since last enrolled at UW–Madison, a list of courses in progress (if applicable), and an academic action from the dean's office if they are in "dropped" or "must obtain permission to continue" status.

Nondegree University Special and Guest Students

Undergraduate students visiting from other universities or recent UW–Madison graduates may desire to enroll at UW–Madison as nondegree University Special and Guest students. Contact the Division of Continuing Studies, Adult Career and Special Student Services.
21 North Park Street
Madison, WI 53715
608-263-6960
advising@dcs.wisc.edu

Placement Tests

Each student comes to UW–Madison with a unique set of skills and academic preparation. To asses where each student stands in beginning to meet their General Education Requirements, placement tests provide academic advisors with the tools to help determine in which courses students should enroll. Placement tests are required of all incoming freshman and some transfer students depending on college course work. Other exams such as ACT, SAT, SAT II, TOEFL, Advanced Placement (AP), International Baccalaureate (IB), etc. do not satisfy the requirement of placement tests, however, scores on these exams may assist in appropriate course enrollment advising.

UW Placement tests are developed by faculty and instructional staff from various UW System campuses and led by Testing and Evaluation Services (T&E). T&E conducts studies to support the development of these tests and effectively uses the results to place incoming students into appropriate levels of English, math, and foreign language.

Outlined below are the situations typical for requiring placement tests. The Office of Admissions and Recruitment determines which placement tests are required. After students are admitted to the University of Wisconsin–Madison, they will receive an email from the Office of Admissions and Recruitment indicating which placement tests are required.

Language Placement Exams

The UW System offers placement exams for French, German and Spanish that are available through the Regional Placement Testing Program. Students are encouraged to take a foreign language placement test if they plan to continue studying a foreign language they have already taken in high school or college. If no placement exam is taken, students may enroll in the first semester course.  UW–Madison offers language instruction in more than 30 languages.  For additional information about placement, see Languages at UW–Madison.

Math Placement Exams

Students admitted to undergraduate degree granting programs who:

1. Are admitted as first year students
2. Are admitted as transfer students and
        A. Have not previously completed the UW System math placement exam.
OR
        B. Do not have credit for the UW-Madison direct equivalent of MATH 112, MATH 113, MATH 114, MATH 211, or any MATH course that is numbered higher than 211.
         i. For students who have a course in progress at the time of admission, it is assumed they will complete the course, so they are not asked to take the placement test.
OR
        C. Have completed the equivalent of MATH 95 or MATH 96 at a UW System institution.

Notes:
Satisfaction of QR-A from a math course that is transferred in does not automatically exempt students from the UW math placement test.
MATH 101 equivalents will be converted to MATH 96, and/or will be reviewed by the math department for possible MATH 96.
See also the Mathematics Placement Chart.

English Placement Exams

Students admitted to undergraduate degree-granting programs who:

1. Are admitted as first year students and are not required to take the ESLAT
OR
2. Are admitted as transfer students and
        A. Have not previously completed the UW System English Placement Exam.
OR
        B. Do not have credit for the UW-Madison equivalent of a Communications Part A course.

English Placement Exams for International Students

Students who have not studied in the United States all four years of high school are typically required to take the ESL Assessment Test (ESLAT) instead of the English Placement Exam, as it is a culture-neutral test of English.

Retroactive Language Credit

In some schools and colleges at UW–Madison, it is possible to earn retro credits for prior work completed in a foreign language. To earn these credits, students must take a course above the first-semester level in French, German, Hebrew, Italian, Latin, Portuguese, Spanish, or any other language in which they have some proficiency. The course must be designated appropriate for earning retro credits by the department and must be the first foreign language course taken by the student after enrolling in the university. Students who take a college-level language course while still in high school may still pursue retro credits at the university.

Students interested in earning retro credits should plan to take the foreign language placement test and consult with the foreign language advisor at SOAR. Students must enroll in the language course prior to earning 30 degree credits (including credits transferred from other colleges but not including AP, CLEP, IB or retro credits in another language) and earn a grade of B or better. UW–Madison honors retro credits earned at previous institutions as long as the student enrolled in the course prior to earning 30 credits and earned a grade of B or better. Native speakers of a language are not eligible to earn retro credits in that language. For more information, see Retroactive Credits in the College of Letters & Science section of the Guide.

Advanced Placement (AP) and International Baccalaureate (IB)

Both Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate Higher Level examinations offer the possibility of receiving credits at UW–Madison. Many high schools offer courses through the College Board's Advanced Placement (AP) program or the International Baccalaureate (IB) program. UW–Madison offers degree credit based on a student's performance on the AP and IB exams administered in high schools. (AP and IB exams must be taken before entering UW–Madison.) Students who receive credit for a particular course through AP or IB and take the same course at UW–Madison will not receive degree credit twice; however, the grade in the UW–Madison course will be included in the overall grade point average.

GCE Advanced Level (A-Level)

In many cases, students may receive advanced-standing credit for some A-level exams. After a student has been admitted, the Office of Admissions and Recruitment will perform an official evaluation of credit for A-Level exam results. In order to grant the credit, we require an official copy of the A-Level exam certificate from the examination board. Credits will not be posted from Results Slips or internal school transcripts. Review the chart to see how A-Level credit will be awarded. Examinations not listed in this chart will be evaluated by the Office of Admissions and Recruitment for appropriate advanced standing credit.

College-Level Examination Program (CLEP)

The College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) allows students who have gained college-level knowledge outside the classroom to take examinations for possible college credit. Each exam is 90 minutes long and is made up primarily of multiple-choice questions. Some exams include an essay; however, UW–Madison does not require the essay for any CLEP exam. Credit will be granted only to those students who have completed fewer than 16 semester hours of college credit when the examinations are taken. Students must earn a minimum score of 65 to receive credit. The scores for awarding credit at the University of Wisconsin–Madison do not necessarily match those recommended by the American Council on Education.

Credit by Departmental Examination

Students may acquire knowledge, skills, and competencies through experiences that are academic in nature but may not necessarily correspond to a setting in which UW–Madison awards traditional credit. Credit by department examination is one opportunity for undergraduate students to demonstrate mastery of material that is equivalent to what would be learned in a specific UW–Madison course. The course credits granted through departmental examination are based on a student’s demonstration that they have mastered the learning outcomes equivalent to those for the specified course. Examples of circumstances that will lead students to seek credit by examination may be: they completed preparation for advanced placement exams in high school but were unable to take the AP test; they have placement test scores that place them in a course lower than what they think they are prepared for; they did not get transfer equivalency for a course but they judge that they have completed the material in a course at another university.  

To learn more about obtaining credit by departmental examination including eligibility and fees, review the policy here.

Explore UW-Madison Undergraduate Opportunities 

What Is Advising?

At UW–Madison advising is a partnership between students and the network of advisors they build during their time here. It is one of the most essential resources available to students and can play a pivotal role in the college experience and beyond. Advisors can help students get the most out of their college years by helping them make well-informed decisions, sharing strategies for success, supporting them as they encounter challenges, connecting them to resources, and providing information about campus policies and procedures.

There are many reasons to see an advisor and advising is not limited to certain subjects or specific months of the year. Here are some of the many topics that advisors can help students with:

  • Discovering and achieving academic, career, and life goals
  • Connecting a major to a career
  • Creating a graduation timeline plan
  • Selecting courses and fulfilling degree requirements
  • Connecting with tutors
  • Getting involved with campus organizations
  • Practicing for job interviews
  • Choosing a study abroad program
  • Finding an internship
  • Researching volunteer opportunities
  • Understanding university policies and deadlines
  • Talking about graduate school
  • Proofreading resumes and cover letters

To find contact information for advisors, including the assigned advisor, see this link.

Cross-College Advising Service (CCAS)

The Cross-College Advising Service (CCAS) is a campuswide advising service for undergraduates who are undecided about a major and want to explore the many academic opportunities on campus. CCAS also assists students who are considering changing majors or who have not been admitted to limited-enrollment programs and need to explore other options. CCAS advisors are knowledgeable about all the programs and majors offered by the eight undergraduate schools and colleges on campus. Each year at SOAR (Student Orientation, Advising, and Registration), approximately one-third of the students in the entering class self-identify as "undecided/exploring" and are assigned to CCAS advisors.

In addition to the main CCAS office in Ingraham Hall, CCAS has residence hall advising offices in Chadbourne Residential College, Sellery Hall, Witte Hall, Ogg Hall, and Dejope Hall. The Dejope office is available to all students in Lakeshore-area residence halls.

Career Planning

Career planning is a multi-year process that includes self-assessment and reflection, exploring academic and career options, gaining experience in areas of interest, and ultimately organizing and conducting a job or graduate school search.

Students work with professional career advisors to engage in a wide variety of career planning activities to prepare for life after earning a degree from UW–Madison: educational workshops, job shadowing, informational interviewing, mock interviews, internships, career fairs and more.  Active engagement in these activities assists students in achieving career readiness, which is “the attainment and demonstration of competencies that prepare college graduates for a successful transition into the workplace.” (National Association of Colleges and Employers).

All students are encouraged to work with a career advisor. Each individual school or college offers career services, and the Career Exploration Center (CEC) works with students looking to explore their options. Links to each of the campus career services offices are available online at careers.wisc.edu.

CAREER EXPLORATION CENTER (CEC)

The Career Exploration Center (CEC) is an early-stage career counseling resource that focuses primarily on students who have not yet decided on an academic major and/or their intended career path. The CEC is the leading campus resource for UW-Madison undergraduates who desire integrated major and career exploration. CEC career advisors help students focus on their interests, values, strengths, and personality to give them the tools they need to make decisions about their careers and their futures.

The center offers individual career advising appointments, a robust career library, workshops on a variety of topics that engage students in major and career exploration, career assessments (often referred to as “career tests”), and the Majors Fair which provides students the opportunity to speak with representatives from more than 100 academic programs in one place.

Pre-Professional Study

PRE-HEALTH ADVISING

Students interested in preparing for medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, veterinary medicine, nursing, occupational therapy, physical therapy, physician assistant or public health, chiropractic, or podiatric medicine should work with the Center for Pre-Health Advising (CPHA)

CPHA supports students as they explore graduate and professional programs in healthcare. Its team of professional advisors helps students integrate the prerequisite coursework into their school/college and major requirements, discuss ways to get involved in research and clinical service opportunities on campus. CPHA advisors can help students prepare for professional exams and the application process, summer research programs, internships, and scholarship opportunities.

PRE-LAW

The best preparation for law school is a broad liberal arts background that includes courses that strengthen communication skills, the ability to think logically, and understanding human instructions and values. Pre-law is not an undergraduate major.

The Center for Pre-Law Advising provides advising and other resources to UW-Madison students and alumni at all stages in the process of considering, preparing for, and applying to law school. Unlike other pre-professional tracks in college, there is no prerequisite coursework that students must complete in order to either apply to or succeed in law school. There are, however, certain skills and broad areas of knowledge that could better prepare students for law school. Pre-Law Advising staff are available to assist with course selection, law school application development, and research on careers in the legal profession. For more information, students should contact a pre-law advisor (see Pre-Law Advising).

Graduating in Four Years or Fewer

UW–Madison encourages, supports, and expects students to work with academic advisors to create, maintain, and plan a graduation timeline. Students should consult with their assigned academic advisor(s) before each enrollment period, and more as needed.

  • Developing a strategic exploration plan to explore interests while making progress on degree requirements
  • Creating a plan to set and achieve academic and career goals
  • Discussing academic challenges and connecting to resources that support academic success
  • Reviewing procedures and requirements for declaring a major
  • Using the Degree Audit Reporting System (DARS) to check progress toward the degree
  • Discussing any changes to a declared major, as well as alternative plans if applying to a competitive enrollment major
  • Creating a strategic course schedule to stay on track for graduation

A reciprocal agreement for a four-year graduation plan is available for most degree programs to students entering UW–Madison as freshmen. Students interested in the agreement must attend SOAR (Student Orientation, Advising, and Registration). For more information see UW–Madison Four-Year Graduation Agreement.

Degree Audit Reporting System (DARS)

A  Degree Audit Reporting System (DARS) report is an automated summary of a student's degree progress. All schools and colleges at UW-Madison use DARS to audit the progress of most undergraduate degree programs and certificates.

DARS reports indicate which requirements are completed, which are complete with in-progress courses, and which remain unsatisfied. The report may specify courses that meet unsatisfied requirements. For most undergraduate programs, DARS is the tool used to determine completion of the program and/or eligibility to graduate.

Students can request and review their DARS in the Student Center via MyUW, and should contact their assigned advisor(s) for help reading and interpreting their DARS report.

Study Abroad Students

Students considering participation in a study abroad program sponsored by a university other than UW–Madison should contact International Academic Programs (IAP) for more information.

For all students: UW–Madison students participating in a semester-long study abroad program sponsored by a university other than UW–Madison must apply for reentry admission to Wisconsin. (Students participating in a summer or winterim program do not need to apply for reentry admission.)

Wisconsin Experience

The Wisconsin Experience is UW–Madison’s vision for the total undergraduate student experience, which combines learning in and out of the classroom. Tied to the Wisconsin Idea and steeped in our long-standing institutional values—the commitment to the truth, shared participation in decision-making, and service to local and global communitiesthe Wisconsin Experience describes how students develop and integrate these core values across their educational experience.

Through the Wisconsin Experience, our students will engage in the following areas of intellectual and personal growth.

Empathy and Humility

  • Develop and demonstrate cultural understanding of self and others
  • Engage locally, nationally, and globally in a respectful and civil manner
  • Appreciate and celebrate one another’s abilities, views, and accomplishments

 Relentless Curiosity

  • Actively learn with expert instructors, scholars, and peers
  • Engage in creative inquiry, scholarship, and research
  • Develop resilience, and foster courage in life and learning

 Intellectual Confidence

  • Develop competence, depth, and expertise in a field of study
  • Integrate ideas and synthesize knowledge across multiple contexts
  • Exercise critical thinking and effective communication

Purposeful Action

  • Apply knowledge and skills to solve problems
  • Engage in public service, partner with others, and contribute to community
  • Lead for positive change

Academic Enrichment and Honors Programs

UW–Madison offers students many ways to enrich their academic program, regardless of the major field of study they choose to pursue. Engaging in research, studying abroad, being part of learning communities, participating in university honors, becoming a student leader, engaging in service learning—these are all vital components that enhance and strengthen classroom learning. This partnership between in- and out-of-classroom learning form the foundation of the Wisconsin Experience. The university encourages students to take advantage of opportunities to integrate their learning experiences.

Honors Programs

Honors programs, which vary slightly among the schools and colleges, are designed for students who wish to undertake work that is more intensive than regular course work. High grade point averages are required to maintain honors student standing. For more information, students should refer to the specific school or college section in this catalog, contact an honors advisor or consult Honors and Scholars Programs.

Undergraduate Research Opportunities

One of the most exciting things in life is to discover something new. UW–Madison provides unique opportunities to learn from and work with some of the world’s leading researchers and scholars. Options range from assisting with professors’ ongoing research to designing and directing one's own projects. For many examples, see Undergraduate Research Opportunities. The Undergraduate Research Scholars Program is one opportunity available in the first or second year of study. Students may cap off their undergraduate degree with a senior thesis or senior honors thesis and are encouraged to present their work at the Undergraduate Symposium. For program descriptions, see Undergraduate Symposium. For a sampling of the many grants and awards available to support and honor this work, visit the Undergraduate Academic Awards Office.

Service Learning

Undergraduates have access to more than 100 service-learning courses each year. These courses emphasize hands-on experiences that address real-world issues as a venue for educational growth. More information on service learning is available at the Morgridge Center for Public Service.

Learning Communities

UW–Madison's rich tradition of supporting learning communities means that the traditional classroom is not the only place where students learn. Students may choose to participate in any of the many residential and nonresidential learning communities, where students, faculty, and staff work together as both learners and teachers to pursue their academic interests. For more information about residential options, see this link.

Study Abroad Programs

Study abroad programs provide students with opportunities to gain the global competence vital in the twenty-first century. Each year UW–Madison sends more than 2,000 students on study abroad programs around the globe. Study abroad provides a unique learning environment that extends and enhances courses taken on the home campus.

International Academic Programs (IAP) serves as the primary study abroad office on campus, offering over 200 programs in over 60 countries around the world. IAP program offerings, available to all majors, range from short-term, faculty-led opportunities to intensive language study, internships, a semester or a year at a university overseas, service-learning, and programs with special themes. Students can visit the Study Abroad Resource Center, 301 Red Gym, to meet with returned study abroad students and professional study abroad advisors who can help students prepare and research study abroad options.

In addition to IAP, the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences, College of Engineering, and Wisconsin School of Business also offer international programs. These programs serve specialized needs within these schools and colleges for their undergraduate students.

The Value of Study Abroad

Study abroad plays a crucial role in preparing students to broaden their international awareness and sharpen their skills for today's global job market. Regardless of their major, students will find that study abroad has much to offer. The availability of a variety of program sites and durations allows students to select programs based on their individual academic interests and personal goals and objectives. Students can choose from programs specifically designed to further their language skills or choose from programs featuring courses taught in English, and which require no previous foreign language training. Students can also find programs that incorporate internships for academic credit, service-learning opportunities, and independent field research.

Academic Credit and Eligibility

Credits earned through UW–Madison study abroad programs are considered "residence credits." Credits and grades will be posted on the UW–Madison transcript. In general, credits earned abroad can count toward fulfilling college and major requirements in any UW–Madison school or college. Seniors who complete their major and degree requirements while abroad on a UW–Madison program may graduate at the end of their study abroad program.

Each study program has its own eligibility requirements. Opportunities are available to students at all academic levels and for a range of program durations from one week to one year. Interested students benefit by talking with their academic advisor early in their academic career about how study abroad can fit into their academic plan and future career goals.

Costs and Affordability

All programs are developed as cost-effectively as possible, recognizing the financial concerns of students. Overall the cost of study abroad includes items that students would have to pay for whether they were at home or abroad: academic fees, room and board, health insurance, and everyday living expenses such as telephone, local transportation, books, and supplies.

Students who study abroad in UW–Madison-sponsored programs may be eligible to use federal financial aid toward the costs of the program. Students should meet with the UW–Madison Office of Student Financial Aid to discuss eligibility requirements. In addition, students can apply for scholarships specifically designated for use with study abroad programs. These include UW–Madison, national, and international scholarship opportunities. Students can also use most campus and academic department scholarships for UW–Madison-sponsored study abroad programs.

UW–Madison's Essential Learning Outcomes

UW–Madison’s Essential Learning Outcomes (ELOs) are shared learning outcomes that serve as an overarching framework to guide the undergraduate experience. Complemented by the Wisconsin Experience, these broad categories encompass many of the goals and purposes shared by UW–Madison’s academic degree programs and co-curricular experiences.

Knowledge of Human Cultures and the Physical and Natural World

Focused by engagement with big questions, both contemporary and enduring.

  • Through study in the sciences and mathematics, social sciences, humanities, histories, languages, and the arts

Intellectual and Practical Skills

Teamwork and problem solving. Practiced extensively across the curriculum in the context of progressively more challenging problems, projects, and standards for performance.

  • Inquiry and analysis
  • Critical and creative thinking
  • Written and oral communication
  • Quantitative literacy
  • Information, media, and technology literacy

Personal and Social Responsibility

Anchored through active involvement with diverse communities and real-world challenges.

  • Civic knowledge and engagement—local and global
  • Intercultural knowledge and competence
  • Ethical reasoning and action
  • Foundations and skills for lifelong learning

Integrative Learning

Demonstrated through the application of knowledge, skills, and responsibilities to new settings and complex problem.

  • Synthesis and advanced accomplishment across general and specialized studies

The ELOs were developed through an extensive project conducted by the Association of American Colleges and Universities (AAC&U) responding to the question: “What qualities and skills do you want in college graduates?” The ELOs represent the responses from employers, business leaders, faculty, staff, and alumni.

Requirements for Undergraduate Degrees

The University of Wisconsin–Madison sets minimum standards that must be met by all students pursuing an undergraduate degree. The information in the following paragraphs provides general information about study at UW–Madison. Requirements may vary among the schools and colleges, and for specific programs. Students should learn about and understand the specific requirements for their program of study.

Total Degree Credits

To receive a bachelor's degree from UW–Madison, students must earn a minimum of 120 degree credits (which includes AP, IB and other test credit, transfer credit, and retroactive credit). Requirements for some programs may exceed 120 degree credits. Students should consult with their college or department advisor for information on specific credit requirements. Undergraduate Majors.

Residence Credit

Degree candidates are required to earn a minimum of 30 credits in residence at UW–Madison. "In residence" means on the UW–Madison campus with an undergraduate degree classification. “In residence” credit also includes UW–Madison courses offered in distance or online formats, as credits earned in UW–Madison Study Abroad/Study Away programs. Some schools and colleges may have additional requirements concerning courses taken in residence; students should refer to the specific school or college section of the Guide or consult with an advisor.

Undergraduate Major Declaration

Undergraduate degrees at UW–Madison presume that students are completing a program of study that consists of a degree program that combines the requirements for the degree with focused study in a discipline, or that combines school or collegewide requirements with an undergraduate major in which they pursue focused study. All undergraduates are expected to have declared or to have been admitted to their focused area of study by the end of the semester in which they have accumulated 86 credits. Students who have not met this expectation may be prevented from enrolling in future terms until they meet with their advisor. Some schools and colleges have additional requirements governing when majors may be declared; students should refer to the specific school or college section of the Guide and consult with an advisor about declaring their major. For additional details, see Policy on Major Declaration for Schools/Colleges That Enroll Undergraduates.

Academic Probation

Undergraduate students must maintain the minimum academic thresholds, including the minimum grade point average specified by the school, college, or academic program to remain in good academic standing. Students whose academic performance drops below these minimum thresholds will be placed on academic probation.

General Education Requirements

All undergraduate students at UW–Madison must complete the university-wide General Education Requirements, which are designed to convey the essential core of an undergraduate education. This core establishes a foundation for living a productive life, being a citizen of the world, appreciating aesthetic values, and engaging in lifelong learning in a continually changing world. These requirements provide for breadth across the humanities and arts, social studies, and natural sciences; competence in communication, critical thinking, and analytical skills necessary for success in college and beyond; and investigation of the issues raised by living in a culturally diverse society. This core is intended to provide students with intellectual and practical skills, basic knowledge of human cultures and the physical world, strategies for understanding these topics, and tools intended to contribute to their sense of personal and social responsibility. General Education complements the work students do in their majors and degrees. Together, these requirements help students learn what they need to know not just for making a living, but also for making a life.

Completing the General Education Requirements is an important part of achieving these competencies, and to do so, students choose from many courses in communication, ethnic studies, quantitative reasoning, and breadth of study across disciplines in the natural sciences, humanities, literature, and arts, and social and behavioral sciences.

Each school and college may choose to allow General Education courses to count toward other degree and/or major requirements. Students should always check with their advisors to discuss any additional degree requirements and determine if students are required to take specific General Education courses or to complete the requirements in a particular order. Students should review their Degree Audit (DARS) report to see how they are progressing toward fulfilling the General Education requirements. Please refer to this website for more information about the requirements.

The university-wide General Education requirements are:

Breadth, 13–15 Credits, Distributed Over Three Areas

All students must complete 13–15 credits of coursework intended to provide a breadth of experience across the major modes of academic inquiry. This requirement encourages students to adopt a broad intellectual perspective, to examine the world through investigative, critical, and creative strategies practiced in the natural (computational, biological, and physical) sciences, social and behavioral sciences, as well as in the arts and humanities.

Learning Outcomes: Students acquire critical and creative thinking skills as well as enhance their problem-solving skills through a breadth of study across the humanities and arts, social studies, computational, biological sciences and physical sciences.

In courses satisfying the Breadth requirement, students will:

  • articulate examples of significant contributions to human understanding achieved through various “ways of knowing” found in the arts and humanities; social and behavioral sciences; and computational, biological, and physical  sciences.
  • recognize and articulate the ways in which different disciplines approach questions that call upon different tools of inquiry, understanding, and creative enterprise.
  • identify ways in which multiple tools of inquiry and understanding can be used to achieve greater insight into resolving “big” questions (e.g., climate change, poverty, global health etc.), evaluating the strengths and weaknesses of those approaches, and understanding which complementary approaches will help achieve meaningful change.
  • evaluate different modes of inquiry across the humanities and arts; social studies; computational, biological, and physical sciences, and identify strengths and weaknesses of those approaches across disciplines when approaching a question.

To achieve these outcomes, students are required to complete courses in the following areas.

  • Natural Science, 4 to 6 credits, consisting of one 4- or 5-credit course with a laboratory component; or two courses providing a total of 6 credits
  • Humanities/Literature/Arts, 6 credits
  • Social Studies, 3 credits

This requirement challenges students to understand that there are many ways to research, understand, communicate about, and interpret creatively the world around us. These "ways of knowing" intersect and overlap, and the ideas presented in one area will often inform and transform what students know and how they think about the others. Students develop skills that help them make informed decisions in a wide range of political, economic, and social contexts, to think critically about the world, to better understand their own and others' experience, and to behave in socially responsible ways. (For more information about how this exposure to breadth of inquiry and expression enriches students’ undergraduate experience and complements intensive study in the major, please see the General Education Requirements website.)

Communication, 3 to 5/6 Credits

The Communication requirement helps to ensure that all graduates of UW–Madison acquire essential communication and research-gathering skills necessary for success in university course work and beyond. Communication–A (Comm A) and Communication–B (Comm B) courses train students to gather and assess information from a variety of sources and to present different kinds of information, insight, and analysis to diverse audiences. These courses are essential for students' career success and their preparation for public life in a rapidly changing world. While Comm–A courses focus exclusively on essential communication skills, Comm–B courses provide content instruction in a specific discipline and teach research, writing, and speaking skills in conjunction with the course content. Comm–B courses are offered by departments across campus and vary widely in topic, content, and format.

Learning Outcomes:  Students develop skills that enable them to be effective speakers and writers in and out of the classroom.

In courses satisfying the Communication requirement, students will:

  • make effective use of information retrieved, organized, and synthesized from appropriate sources.
  • present ideas and information clearly and logically to achieve a specific purpose.
  • make effective use of communicative forms appropriate to a specific discipline, and adapted to the intended audience.
  • use appropriate style and conventions associated with particular communicative forms, genres, or disciplines.

To achieve these outcomes, students must complete the following Communication requirements:

  • Part A. Literacy Proficiency. 2–3 credits at first-year level dedicated to reading, listening, and discussion, with emphasis on writing. While most incoming freshmen are required to complete coursework to fulfill this requirement, students may be exempted from Part A by approved college course work while in high school, AP test scores, or placement testing. Students are expected to satisfy this requirement by the end of their first year of undergraduate study.
  • Part B. Enhancing Literacy Proficiency. 2–3 credits of more advanced coursework for students who have completed or been exempted from Part A. Students should consult with the appropriate undergraduate advisor about when this requirement should be completed. Courses that satisfy this requirement are offered in many fields of study; although a wide variety of courses fulfill this requirement, students are encouraged to select a course most in keeping with their interests or other requirements of their intended field(s) of study.

Ethnic Studies, 3 Credits

The Ethnic Studies requirement is intended to increase understanding of the culture and contributions of persistently marginalized racial or ethnic groups in the United States, and to equip students to respond constructively to issues connected with our pluralistic society and global community. Because this increased understanding is expected to have a positive effect on campus climate, students are expected to complete this requirement within the first 60 credits of undergraduate study

Learning Outcomes: Students draw connections between historical and present day circumstances, and consider perceptions and cultural assumptions when examining questions and making decisions.

In courses satisfying the Ethnic Studies requirement, students will:

  • articulate some of the effects the past has had on present day circumstances, perceptions of, and disparities in, race in the U.S.
  • recognize and question cultural assumptions, rules, biases, and knowledge claims as they relate to race and ethnicity.
  • examine questions and make decisions with consideration for the cultural perspectives and worldviews of others.

Students complete this requirement by taking one course of at least 3 credits that is designated as an Ethnic Studies course.

Quantitative Reasoning, 3 to 6 Credits

Quantitative Reasoning is the process of forming conclusions, judgments or inferences from quantitative information. The Quantitative Reasoning requirement at UW–Madison has two parts: Part A and B. Quantitative Reasoning A courses provide students with skills in mathematics, computer science, statistics or formal logic that are needed for dealing with quantitative information. The acquired skills are broad-based in order to have a positive impact on the readiness of students to take a Quantitative Reasoning B course in a variety of disciplines. Quantitative Reasoning B courses allow students to enhance their Quantitative Reasoning Proficiency in a more advanced setting, where they make significant use of quantitative tools in the context of other course material.

Learning Outcomes: Students utilize mathematical models for scientific or real life problems to set up, analyze, interpret, make judgments, and draw appropriate conclusions based on quantitative analysis of data.

In courses satisfying the Quantitative Reasoning requirement, students will set up an abstract mathematical model or hypothesis for a given scientific or real life problem.

  • interpret, handle and manipulate quantitative data sets for scientific or real life problems.
  • quantitatively analyze data to obtain relevant insight about a given problem.
  • make judgments and draw appropriate conclusions based on the quantitative analysis of data.

Students must complete the following to satisfy the Quantitative Reasoning Requirement:

  • Part A. Quantitative Reasoning Proficiency. This requirement can be satisfied by:
    • approved college work while in high school, AP test scores, or placement testing; or
    • taking a 3 credit course at UW–Madison with a Quantitative Reasoning A designation.

To ensure timely completion of the undergraduate degree, students should complete Part A of the Quantitative Reasoning requirement by the end of their first year.

  • Part B. Enhancing Quantitative Reasoning Proficiency. 3 credit course at UW–Madison with a Quantitative Reasoning B designation after satisfying the Part A requirement.  Courses that satisfy this requirement are offered in a variety of fields of study. Students are encouraged to select a course in keeping with their interests or other requirements of their intended field(s) of study.

Identifying Courses That Meet General Education Requirements

The university offers hundreds of courses that meet the requirements described above. Students should consider their own interests and check with their advisor when deciding which courses to complete. Please note that many undergraduate programs of study have breadth requirements that go beyond these basic university-wide requirements.

The following language is used in the UW–Madison course listings to indicate how courses count toward satisfying the communication, quantitative reasoning, and ethnic studies portions of the General Education Requirements. Courses that satisfy these requirements are also tagged with a mortarboard symbol. mortar board

  • Communication Part A
  • Communication Part B
  • Ethnic Studies
  • Quantitative Reasoning Part A
  • Quantitative Reasoning Part B

Note: Some Communication Part B courses carry Communication B credit only at the lecture or section level and/or only in certain semesters; these courses will be indicated in the Schedule of Classes.

Course descriptions also include information about whether courses meet General Education Humanities, Natural Science, or Social Studies Breadth Requirements. (Click on course numbers in the Guide to see this information.) Students should also be aware that each school and college may, at its own discretion, designate additional courses that satisfy these requirements. For this reason, students should consult their advisors to obtain information about how these requirements are implemented in the school or college in which they are enrolled.

General Education Policies

Exemption from General Education: All students are required to meet the fundamental degree requirements of the university, which include general education.

Disability-Based Waivers:The university has determined that waivers to the communication and quantitative reasoning portions of the general education component would fundamentally alter the nature of the University of Wisconsin–Madison degree. Students should not expect to obtain disability-based waivers to the communication and quantitative reasoning portions of the General Education Requirements.

Pass/Fail: Effective fall 2012, all courses taken to meet the University General Education Requirements must be taken on a graded basis. These grades are included in students' GPA calculations according to school/college GPA rules.

Graduating

Declaration of Intent to Graduate. When students expect to graduate, they must indicate their intent by completing the graduation application available in the MyUW Student Center. It is the policy of UW–Madison that all work for the degree must be completed and all degree requirements satisfied before the degree can be conferred.

Conferral of Degrees. When students have been certified as having completed all university general education, degree, and major requirements, the degree will be awarded. When the degree is awarded, a diploma will be issued, listing the degree earned, and the transcript updated to reflect the degree, major, and any other approved academic programs completed. Students who have holds on their records will not receive their diplomas, or be able to order transcripts, until the holds are cleared. 

Commencement. Students who wish to attend the spring or winter commencement ceremony must indicate their intent by completing the graduation application available via Student Center in My UW by the posted deadline. Students may participate in the commencement ceremony, in which the chancellor and deans symbolically confer the degrees, even if all degree requirements have not been completed. Neither participation in the ceremony nor listing in the program conveys degree conferral. Students will not receive the diploma or transcript notation until all degree requirements are certified as complete by their respective school or college. Should a student’s graduation plans change, updates to the intended term of graduation must be indicated via the graduation application in the MyUW Student Center.

The Office of the Registrar is responsible for maintaining the academic records of students who attend the University of Wisconsin–Madison and for many services associated with these records, including enrollment and grading. The office is located at:

333 East Campus Mall #10101
608-262-3811

Many student services are available online in the Student Center on My UW–Madison (My UW), including enrolling for courses, viewing grades, and updating address and emergency contact information. Students are responsible for the accuracy of the addresses provided in My UW and for the courses selected when they enroll. For more information about services available through the Student Center, see the Student Demos & Tutorials section of the Office of the Registrar website.

My UW is available to eligible students, who gain access by using their Net ID and password. Access to My UW–Madison is available from any computer with Internet access. For further information about My UW–Madison, see DoIT (Division of Information Technology).

Enrollment

Students enroll for courses, obtain information about deadlines, view their class schedule, and more in the Student Center on My UW. Individuals who are not eligible to activiate their Net ID to access the Student Center can view an up-to-date schedule of classes at the Office of the Registrar website. Information about key deadlines and course enrollment, and online demonstrations of class search, course enrollment, and the Student Center are also available at the Office of the Registrar website. Additional assistance with the course enrollment process is available by calling 608-262-0920 or sending an e-mail to webenroll@em.wisc.edu.

Grading System

The general quality of a student's work is expressed in terms of a grade point average (GPA). It is based on the total number of credits taken for which grades of A through F are received. Semester grades are reported by letter only; plus and minus signs are not authorized. The highest possible GPA is 4.0, representing A grades in every course; the lowest possible is 0.0. The following is the official scale of grades at UW–Madison.

Grades with Associated Grade Points per Credit

Grade   Grade Points Per Credit
A Excellent 4
AB Intermediate Grade 3.5
B Good 3
BC Intermediate Grade 2.5
C Fair 2
D Poor 1
F Failure 0

Excluded from the grade point average are:

S or U (Satisfactory or Unsatisfactory) in courses taken on the pass/fail basis: S for grades A through C; U for grades D and F.

Cr or N (Credit or No Credit) in courses offered on a credit/no credit basis.

I (Incomplete), a temporary grade used when work is not completed during a term. The symbol IN will be used to indicate an incomplete in a Cr/N course.

Audited courses, denoted as AU in place of a number of credits on grade reports and transcripts, are graded either S (Satisfactory) or NR (No Report).

P (Progress), a temporary grade used for courses extending beyond one term. The final grade determines the grade for each term and replaces P grades for the course.

DR (Dropped), recorded for any course officially dropped later than two days before the last day to add courses.

NW (No Work) is used to indicate that the student never attended and no work was submitted.

In those relatively few cases in which no authorized grade is reported for a student at the close of a term, NR (No Report) will be used to signify the fact for record purposes.

Credit/No Credit Courses

Some courses are designated as being offered on a Credit/No Credit basis. The transcript for the course will indicate either CR, meaning the student earned the credits for which the course was offered, or N, meaning that the student did not earn any credit even though enrolled for the course. Students may not take such courses on any other basis.

Pass/Fail

Policy on Use of Pass/Fail Grading Option for Undergraduates

This policy concerns the use of the pass/fail grading option for degree-seeking undergraduate students. According to the UW–Madison grading scale, grades of S (satisfactory) and U (unsatisfactory) are the transcripted grades that are used for what is commonly known as pass/fail. It applies only to courses that use the default A–F grading scale and that also allow students to choose to take a course on a pass/fail (PF) basis.1

The instructor enters the letter grade earned by students on the grade roster, and those letter grades are subsequently recorded as a pass (S) or fail (U) on the student record. A pass (S) will be recorded when a letter grade of A through C is earned. A fail (U) will be recorded when a letter grade of D or F is earned. In addition to the S or U notation, the student transcript includes the symbol # for courses that were taken on a pass/fail basis. Neither the S nor the U is used in computing the grade point average. Instructors are not informed that a student has elected to take the course pass/fail.

Student Eligibility

Students must be in good academic standing according to their school/college in order to be eligible to request the pass/fail grading option.

Undergraduates may carry one course on a pass/fail basis per term and a maximum of 16 credits during their undergrad career. The summer sessions collectively count as a single term.

Required courses cannot be taken on a pass/fail basis.  The student’s school or college may review the request to take a course pass/fail and reject requests for nonelective work. It may be difficult for the school or college official to determine whether a course is an elective or being used to fulfill a requirement since a student’s enrollment or the way a course is being used in the specific program of study may change. Ultimately it is the student’s responsibility to be sure that the requested course is an elective. Students are strongly advised to consult with an academic advisor before taking a course pass/fail. Courses taken on a pass/fail basis will not count for nonelective requirements even if they would normally count toward such requirements.

Each school or college is responsible for clearly communicating to its students what the definition of “good academic standing” is and what a free elective is.

In each school or college, the office responsible for academic policy exceptions is authorized to make exceptions to the pass/fail policy.

Process for Requesting the Pass/Fail Grading Option

Students indicate that they would like to have a course they are enrolled in graded on a pass/fail basis by completing a course change request via their Student Center (see Grade Change Request for detailed information). Students may submit pass/fail requests via their Student Center from the time that they enroll until midnight on the Friday at the end of the fourth week of fall and spring semesters. (For modular and summer session courses, pass/fail requests must be submitted by midnight Friday of the week in which the session is one-fourth completed).

The deadline for requesting the pass/fail grading option is posted on the Office of the Registrar website. These deadlines are based on the idea that the pass/fail option is intended to encourage students to explore educational opportunities that they might otherwise not be willing to attempt. Pass/fail is not intended as a way for students to avoid academic consequences.

Once the student has submitted the request to take a course on a pass/fail basis the request is routed via ISIS workflow to an academic dean in the school or college for approval or further communication with the student.  The school/college official must approve the request before the grading option is changed to pass/fail by the Office of the Registrar.

Students can see whether a course is being graded on a pass/fail basis in their Student Center.

1 For study abroad programs operated by the College of Engineering, courses taken abroad toward an engineering major will be posted as pass/fail. This occurs automatically and is not a student option; this practice is not covered or affected by this policy.

Failures

Every course grade of F counts as 0 grade points and remains permanently on the transcript. If the course is repeated, the original F will remain on the transcript and will be included in computing the GPA.

Incompletes

An Incomplete may be reported for a student who has carried a subject with a passing grade until near the end of the semester. If a student is unable to take or complete the final examination because of illness or other circumstances beyond his or her control, the student may be granted an Incomplete. An Incomplete is not given to a student who stays away from a final examination except as indicated above. In the absence of such proof the grade shall be F; even with such proof, if the instructor is convinced that the student cannot pass, the grade shall be F.

Undergraduate students enrolled in the College of Letters & Science must complete the course work for which they received the Incomplete by the end of the fourth week of classes of the their next term of enrollment at UW-Madison (exclusive of summer sessions). Failure to do so will result in a lapse into a grade of F, unless the time limit has been formally extended. Letters & Science students should see the L&S section on Incompletes for important details.

Undergraduates enrolled in schools or colleges other than Letters & Science must complete the course work for which they received the Incomplete by the end of the their next term of enrollment (exclusive of summer sessions). Incompletes incurred in the last term of enrollment may not be removed after five years of absence from the university without special advance permission of the student's associate or assistant dean. Such Incompletes remain on the record but do not lapse into a grade of F.

Audit

Students may audit courses with instructor and advisor consent, and if no laboratory or performance skills are involved. Auditors may not recite or take examinations but are expected to attend classes regularly and do some assigned work. Although courses for which students enroll as an auditor are factored into tuition, such courses do not earn academic credit and do not count in determining full-time/part-time load for enrollment certification in an academic term. The deadline to change a course from credit to audit is the end of the fourth week of classes. School and college policies may vary from this description. Students are advised to consult with the instructor concerning specific course requirements that must be satisfied.

Class Standing

Students are classified by year according to the number of credits and grade points they have earned:

Freshman: less than 24 credits
Sophomore: at least 24 credits
Junior: at least 54 credits
Senior: at least 86 credits

Tuition and Fees

The UW System Board of Regents sets tuition and fee rates annually. Rates are subject to change without notice.

The tuition and fee schedule is available on the Office of the Registrar website. Students who enroll after the first Friday of the official first week of classes are assessed a late initial enrollment fee. Exception: Special and Guest students have until the Friday of the second week of classes to enroll.

For tuition rate questions, contact the Office of the Registrar Tuition Assessment Section.
tuition@em.wisc.edu
608-262-4031
333 East Campus Mall #10301
Madison, WI 53715-1384

Enrolled students can view tuition charges/payments, financial aid (loans, grants, scholarships) received, and refunds on their My UW Student Center, Tuition Account Summary); they can also access links to view and pay tuition eBills, set up Authorized Payers for tuition account access, and enroll for eRefund.

The Bursar’s Office provides the tuition bill as an eBill which is published on the Tuition Account eBill/ePayment site. Students and their Authorized Payers receive an email alert when the eBill is available to view.

For tuition account activity and billing questions, contact the Bursar's Office.
tuition@bussvc.wisc.edu (include student ID and name)
608-262-3611
333 East Campus Mall #10501
Madison, WI 53715-1383

Payment of Tuition and Fees

The UW–Madison Bursar's Office does not accept debit or credit cards, nor offer an installment plan. Tuition payment options are: make an ePayment; mail a check to the Bursar's Office at the address above; pay in person with check or cash at the Bursar's Office; or put a check in the first-floor lobby or 10th-floor dropbox. For detailed payment information, see Tuition & Fee Payments on the bursar's website.

If tuition is not paid by the due date, a late fee is assessed and a hold is placed on the student account to prevent future enrollment and release of official transcripts and diplomas, until the account is paid.

Residence for Tuition Purposes

Wisconsin Statutes, Section 36.27(2), governs resident status for tuition purposes at all University of Wisconsin System institutions. Students who do not qualify under one of the exceptions in the statute will be assessed nonresident tuition. In determining resident status for tuition purposes, standards are different from those used for voting, paying taxes, applying for various licenses, and the like. In general, a student must be a bona fide resident of Wisconsin for at least 12 months before enrollment for any term in order to be eligible for in-state tuition. However, a student who comes to Wisconsin primarily for educational reasons does not automatically qualify as a Wisconsin resident even after living in Wisconsin for a year or more.

For more information and the full text of Wisconsin Statutes, Section 36.27(2), see the Office of the Registrar website or contact a residence counselor at 608-262-1355; res4tuition@em.wisc.edu.

Minnesota Reciprocity for Tuition Rates

Minnesota residents who are certified by the Minnesota Office of Higher Education for the appropriate term to attend UW–Madison under the Minnesota–Wisconsin Tuition Reciprocity Agreement will be assessed the approved reciprocity tuition rate, plus the segregated fees assessed all UW–Madison students. Students under this program will be classified as nonresidents of Wisconsin.

It is the student's responsibility to inquire about application procedures, deadline dates, and reapplication procedures. Students may apply online on the Minnesota Office of Higher Education website. Questions may be directed to the Minnesota Office of Higher Education:
1450 Energy Park Drive, Suite 350
St. Paul, MN 55108-5227
651-642-0567 or 1-800-657-3866

They may also be directed to the UW–Madison Office of the Registrar, Tuition Assessment Section:
333 East Campus Mall #10301
Madison, WI 53715-1384
tuition@em.wisc.edu
608-262-4031

Student Privacy Rights (FERPA)

Students have the right to inspect and review most education records maintained about them by the University of Wisconsin–Madison and, in many cases, decide if a third person can obtain information from them. Students may challenge information in their records which they believe to be inaccurate, misleading, or inappropriate.

The university has adopted a policy statement implementing all provisions of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA). A copy of this statement may be obtained at the Office of the Registrar, 333 East Campus Mall #10101. The university, in accordance with the act, has designated the following as "directory information," which is publicly available unless a student asks to have any or all of it withheld: name; postal address; telephone numbers; e-mail addresses; date of birth; major field(s) of study and number of academic credits earned toward degree; attendance status (including current year, credit load, and full-or part-time status); dates of attendance (matriculation and withdrawal dates); degrees and awards received (type of degree and date granted); previously attended educational agencies or institutions; participation in officially recognized activities; and participation in athletics and weight and height of athletes.

Students wishing to keep some or all of their "directory information" confidential should restrict their information in the Student Center in My UW. Students with questions about the provisions of the act or who believe the university is not complying with the act may obtain assistance from the Office of the Registrar:
333 East Campus Mall #10101
Madison, WI 53715-1384
reginfo@em.wisc.edu
608-262-3811

Students have the right to file complaints alleging university noncompliance with the act with the federal agency that enforces the act. The address is: The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act Office, Department of Education, 330 Independence Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20201.

Information about the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, as amended, is distributed during Wisconsin Welcome and is available at:
Office of the Registrar
333 East Campus Mall #10101
Madison, WI 53715-1384

Availability of Academic Record Information to Parents or Guardians or Others

A student may authorize a third party (e.g., a parent, guardian, spouse, potential employer, etc.) access to academic record information. An authorization form is available at the Office of the Registrar's website, or by visiting the Office of the Registrar, 333 East Campus Mall #10101. The authorization form permits release of specified information on a one-time basis to the specified third party. If no authorization is on file, it will be assumed that the student does not wish to give a third party access to academic record information. This policy is designed to give students specific control over the parties to whom academic record information may be released.

Grade reports will not be sent by the university to parents or guardians. Students are urged to keep their parents informed of their academic progress.

Academic Integrity

UW–Madison students have the obligation to conduct their academic work in a manner consistent with high standards of academic integrity. They also have the right to expect that they and other students will be graded fairly, and they have the rights of due process should they be accused of academic misconduct. Therefore, it is important that students:

  • become familiar with the rules of academic misconduct (UWS Ch. 14);
  • ask their instructors if they are unsure whether something is acceptable (for example, how to use sources in a paper or whether to work with another student on an assignment);
  • let instructors know if they think they see incidents of misconduct;
  • be aware that helping someone else cheat is a violation of the rules; and

For complete discussion of the rules regarding academic integrity, see the Dean of Students website, or contact the assistant dean for academic integrity at 608-263-5700 or Room 70 Bascom Hall.

Student Rights and Responsibilities

Every member of the University of Wisconsin–Madison community has the right to expect to conduct his or her academic and social life in an environment free from threats, danger, or harassment. Students also have the responsibility to conduct themselves in a manner compatible with membership in the university and local communities. UWS Chapters 17 and 18 of the Wisconsin Administrative Code list the university policies students are expected to uphold and describes the procedures used when students are accused of misconduct. Chapter 17 also lists the possible responses the university may apply when a student is found to violate policy. The process used to determine any violations and disciplinary actions is an important part of UWS 17. For the complete text of UWS Chapter 17, see this link, or contact the on-call dean in the Dean of Students Office, 608-263-5700, Room 70 Bascom Hall.

No student may be denied admission to, participation in or the benefits of, or discriminated against in any service, program, course or facility of the [UW] system or its institutions or centers because of the student's race, color, creed, religion, sex, national origin, disability, ancestry, age, sexual orientation, pregnancy, marital status or parental status.

Student Grievance Procedure

Any student at UW–Madison who feels that he or she has been treated unfairly has the right to voice a complaint and receive a prompt hearing of the grievance. The basis for a grievance can range from something as subtle as miscommunication to the extreme of harassment.

Each school or college has a procedure to hear grievances. Generally the process involves an informal attempt to solve the problem, if appropriate. If not, more formal proceedings can be undertaken until a resolution is reached. Advisors and school or college offices have detailed information. For assistance in determining options, students can contact the on-call dean in the Dean of Students Office, 608-263-5700, Room 70 Bascom Hall, Monday–Friday, 8:30 a.m.–4:30 p.m.

Seeking Assistance

A student can seek help at many places on campus, for both personal and academic problems. For answers to general questions on many topics, a good place to start is Ask Bucky, which is an excellent general referral service.

For personal problems, Counseling Services, a unit of University Health Services, offers a variety of individual, group and couple counseling services. Experienced counselors, psychologists, and psychiatrists are available to assist students in overcoming depression and managing anxiety, and in developing self-awareness and understanding, independence, and self-direction. The counseling staff is experienced and sensitive to students of diverse cultural and ethnic backgrounds. Counseling Services is located at 333 East Campus Mall; 608-265-5600. In addition, an on-call dean in Student Assistance and Judicial Affairs is usually available by telephone (608-263-5700) or on a walk-in basis (75 Bascom Hall) Monday–Friday, 8:30 a.m.–4:30 p.m.

For academic problems, many places can offer help. The student should first discuss the problem with the professor or TA. If the problem is not resolved at that time, the student can speak with an academic advisor or the chair of the department. If further assistance is needed, the student should contact one of the academic deans in the school or college.

AlcoholEdu

AlcoholEdu is an online course overseen by University Health Services that educates students about the impacts of alcohol and provides them with the information to make healthy decisions. All incoming degree seeking undergraduate students--including first-year and transfer students--must complete AlcoholEdu. The program consists of two parts, both of which must be completed.

Nine departments, one center, and a campuswide program—collaborating with many campus units—work with students during their time at UW–Madison. We know that the Wisconsin Experience has the potential to be transformative. We strive to develop world leaders, engaged citizens, and interesting people. We have high expectations of students.

To help them make the most of their experiences at Wisconsin, we urge students to get involved in something that matters, to consider themselves representatives of the university, to act with integrity in all they do, and show respect to everyone they encounter. Students should take pride in themselves as world citizens and as scholars, demonstrate a strong work ethic, and capitalize on their opportunities and challenges. In promoting this behavior, we encourage students to think not just about their future, but about their legacy.

That’s what it means to be a student at Wisconsin. That’s what it means to do things that matter and have purpose. Badgers make the world a better place.

Associated Students of Madison (ASM)

4301 Student Activity Center
333 East Campus Mall
608-265-4276 (265-4ASM)
Web: www.asm.wisc.edu
Twitter: @ASMstudentgovt

  • Promotes student voice as it pertains to legislative, diversity, and university affairs
  • Distributes funding for student activities, organizations, and events to maximize student involvement in shaping campus life
  • Supports elected student representatives

Center for the First-Year Experience

101 Ingraham Hall
1155 Observatory Drive
608-263-0367

Email: newstudent@studentlife.wisc.edu
Web: newstudent.wisc.edu
Facebook: UW First-Year Experience
Twitter: @UWNewStudent

  • Collaborates with campus partners to plan and implement Student Orientation, Advising, and Registration (SOAR) for incoming undergraduates and their families 

  • Oversees Transfer Transition Program, which provides pre-advising services to prospective students and support services to new transfer students on campus 

  • Assists incoming students with the academic and social transitions to the university through direct and indirect programming 

  • Offers seminar courses on the Wisconsin Experience and provides consultation and support to faculty and graduate students who work with first-year students 


Center for Leadership and Involvement

Third Floor, Red Gym
716 Langdon Street

608-263-0365 

Email: cfli@studentlife.wisc.edu
Web: cfli.wisc.edu
Twitter: @UWCfLI

  • Facilitates the registration and advising for more than 1,000 student organizations, including fraternities and sororities 

  • Hosts student organization fairs 

  • Supports the Adventure Learning Programs, Student Leadership Program, the Wisconsin Band, and the Wisconsin Singers 

  • Confers UW–Madison Leadership Certificate 


Dean of Students Office

70 Bascom Hall
500 Lincoln Drive
608-263-5700

Email: dean@studentlife.wisc.edu
Web: students.wisc.edu/doso

  • Provides walk-in or call-in assistance
  • Provides crisis loans and referral services to campus and community resources
  • Responsible for academic and non- academic misconduct process
  • Promotes academic integrity
  • Works to assess potential threats and promote campus safety
  • Supports faculty and staff who have concerns about students they teach or employ

International Student Services

217 Red Gym
716 Langdon Street

608-262-2044

Email: iss@studentlife.wisc.edu
Web: iss.wisc.edu
Twitter: @UW_ISS

  • Provides advising for more than 6,000 international students and their dependents
  • Issues nonimmigrant student visa documents and provides information on immigration regulations and procedures
  • Provides orientation for new arrivals, as well as continuing support services and programs for cultural adjustment and integration to campus and community life

Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender Campus Center

123 Red Gym
716 Langdon Street 

Phone: 608-265-3344

Email: lgbt@studentlife.wisc.edu
Web: lgbt.wisc.edu
Facebook: LGBT Campus Center

  • Educates faculty, staff, and students about sexual orientation and gender identity via ally and topic-specific training
  • Provides support to LGBTQ and ally communities as well as resource materials in the LGBTCC Library, online, and through discussion groups
  • Organizes the Queer Emerging Leaders Program, the LGBTQ Leadership Institute, and a mentoring program
  • Coordinates identity- and community- building events, including Out and About Month and Coming Out Month

McBurney Disability Resource Center

702 West Johnson Street, Suite 2741
608-263-2741

Email: mcburney@studentlife.wisc.edu
Web: mcburney.wisc.edu
Text: 608-225-7956


  • Promotes accessible, open, and welcoming campus community for all people with disabilities 

  • Provides direct support services and classroom accommodations to students with disabilities 

  • Provides information and referral services on disability issues for students, faculty, and staff
  • Offers peer education and campus programming around disability issues and inclusive practices 


Multicultural Student Center

249 Red Gym
716 Langdon Street

608-262-4503

Web: msc.wisc.edu
Social Media: @UWMulticultural

  • Ensures students of all racial and cultural backgrounds are successful and welcome
  • Hosts workshops and guest speakers on topics such as race and identity, allyship, supporting LGBTQ students of color, and creating a more inclusive campus 

  • Organizes the Multicultural Orientation and Reception and the Way Up Student Organization Festival 

  • Provides opportunities for leadership, skill development, and recognition through programs like the Multicultural Leadership Summit and the Multicultural Leadership Awards and Graduation Celebration 


Office of Student Conduct and Community Standards

70 Bascom Hall

500 Lincoln Drive
608-236-5700

Email: dean@studentlife.wisc.edu
Web: students.wisc.edu/student-conduct

  • Upholds every student’s right to learn in a community that is safe, and fosters integrity and accountability 

  • Provides leadership in reducing high-risk student drinking 

  • Partners with instructors to resolve academic misconduct incidents 


Veteran Services and Military Assistance Center

333 East Campus Mall, Suite 10301
Madison, WI 53715
608-265-4628
Email: veterans@wisc.edu
Web: veterans.wisc.edu/

  • A collaborative operation between the Office of the Registrar and the Division of Student Life
  • Assists U.S. military veterans, current service members, and their dependents regarding benefits, enrollment, and other activities pursuant to higher education
  • Holds Veteran networking receptions and resume and interview workshop with local employers and students
  • Advises the VETS student organization

Our Wisconsin

South Mezzanine of the Red Gym
716 Langdon Street
608-262-9067
Email: ourwisc@studentlife.wisc.edu
Web: students.wisc.edu/ourwisconsin

Our Wisconsin is an inclusion program that was developed as an effort to build community among our diverse community. Our Wisconsin's aim is to improve the University of Wisconsin–Madison’s campus climate, as it is one of our core beliefs that every student at UW–Madison, regardless of their background or how they may identify, should feel safe, valued, supported, and welcomed.

Academic Calendar

Establishment of the academic calendar for the University of Wisconsin–Madison falls within the authority of the faculty as set forth in Faculty Policies and Procedures. Construction of the academic calendar is subject to various rules and guidelines prescribed by the Board of Regents, the Faculty Senate and State of Wisconsin legislation. Approximately every five years, the Faculty Senate approves a new academic calendar which spans a future five-year period.
The current calendar was adopted by the Faculty Senate in September 2016.

Animal Sciences B.S.

June 27, 2017
Major Requirements

  • Deleted footnote #2. Moved footnote #2 text to top of section under the heading Business Emphasis. Text: Up to two courses may be applied to Certificate in Business Mgmt. for Ag. & Life Sciences.

Four-Year Plan

Athletic Training B.S.

September 27, 2017
Major Requirements

  • Removed PSYCH 201 and PSYCH 285 from the Science core

Biochemistry B.A. (L&S), B.S. (L&S), B.S. (ALS)

June 13, 2017
B.S. (ALS) Four-Year Plan

September 27, 2017
B.A. (L&S), B.S. (L&S), B.S. (ALS)

Biological Systems Engineering, B.S.

September 27, 2017
Four-Year Plan

Biology B.A. (L&S), B.S. (L&S), and B.S. (ALS)

September 27, 2017
B.A. (L&S), B.S. (L&S), and B.S. (ALS) Major Requirements

  • Added NTP/​MED PHYS  651 to the B. Systems Neurobiology course list under the Neurobiology Option header
  • Added NTP/​MED PHYS  651 to the E. Applied Biology, Agriculture and Natural Resources under the Intermediate/Advanced header

Botany B.A. and B.S.

September 27, 2017
B.A. and B.S. Major Requirements

Chicana/o and Latina/o Studies, Certificate

September 27, 2017
Requirements

Communication Arts B.A. and B.S.

September 27, 2017
B.A. and B.S. Major Requirements

  • Removed Com Arts 353 from Theory-History-Criticism section of Radio-Television-Film Header

Communication Sciences & Disorders B.A. and B.S.

September 6, 2017
B.A. and B.S. Major Requirements, CS&D Courses

September 27, 2017
B.A. and B.S. Major Requirements

  • Added STAT 224 to the Statistics course list under Courses in Related Areas
  • Added LINGUIS 101 and LINGUIS/​ANTHRO  301 to the Linguistics course list under Courses in Related Areas
  • Added PHYSICS 103 and PHYSICS 109 to the Biological Sciences course list under Courses in Related Areas
  • Removed PSYCH 201 and PSYCH 281 from the Psychology course list

Computer Sciences B.A., B.S., and Certificate

September 27, 2017
Major Requirements B.A., B.S., Certificate

Conservation Biology B.A. and B.S.

September 27, 2017
B.A. and B.S. Major Requirements

Criminal Justice Certificate

September 27, 2017
Requirements

  • Removed Psych 586 from Group 2 - Theories of Crime and Deviant Behavior

Electrical Engineering B.S.

August 11, 2017
Requirements, Electrical Engineering Advanced Electives, Computers & Computing

English Language Arts Minor

September 27, 2017
Requirements

  • Removed Com Arts 353 from the Mass Communications course list under the Mass Communication header

Environmental Sciences B.A. (L&S), B.S. (L&S), and B.S. (ALS)

September 27, 2017
B.A. (L&S), B.S. (L&S), and B.S. (ALS) Major Requirements

Genetics B.S.

September 27, 2017
Requirements

  • Changed BMOLCHEM 504 from 2 credits to 3 credits in Capstone course list

Global Health Certificate

September 27, 2017
Requirements

  • Removed THER SCI 105 from Global Health Electives: Public Health Medicine course list
  • Added SOC WORK/​NURSING/​S&A PHM  105 to Global Health Electives: Public Health Medicine course list

International Studies B.A. and B.S

September 27, 2017
B.A. and B.S. Options within the Major

Journalism B.A. and B.S.

September 27, 2017
B.A. and B.S. Major Requirements

  • Removed Psych 201 and Psych 281 from the Introductory Social Science section under the Introductory Requirements

Kinesiology B.S.

September 27, 2017
Major Requirements

  • Removed PSYCH 201 and PSYCH 285 from the Science core

Legal Studies B.A and B.S.

June 13, 2017
B.A. and B.S. Major Requirements

Materials Science and Engineering

September 27, 2017
B.S. Major Requirements

  • Added ZOOLOGY 153 to the Science Electives section under the Science Foundation header
  • Removed INTEGSCI 260 from the Engineering and Society Elective under the Engineering Foundation header
  • Added ENVIR ST/​BOTANY/​ZOOLOGY  260 and ENVIR ST/​GEOSCI  410 to the Engineering and Society Elective under the Engineering Foundation header
  • Changed Free Electives credits from 5 to 4; updated footnote 3 to say "The above subject requirements can be met with 124 credits..."

Four-Year Plan

  • Changed Engineering Foundations Elective credit count from 4 to 3 in the third year Spring
  • Changed Free elective credits from 2 to 1 in the fourth year Spring

Mathematics B.A. and B.S.

June 20, 2017
B.A. and B.S. Major Requirements

September 27, 2017
B.A. and B.S. Major Requirements

Molecular Biology B.A. and B.S.

September 27, 2017
B.A. and B.S. Major Requirements

Neurobiology B.A. and B.S.

September 27, 2017
B.A. and B.S. Major Requirements

  • Remove Psych 481, Psych 486, and Psych 581 from the Distributed Neuroscience section under the Neurobiology header in 30 credits of Biology and Neurobiology header

Pharmacology and Toxicology B.S.

September 27, 2017
Electives in the Major

  • Added HIST SCI/​S&A PHM  401 History of Pharmacy to the History of Science course list under the Electives in the Major header
  • Added KINES 337 Human Anatomy and KINES 338 Human Anatomy Laboratoryto the Kinesiology course list under the Electives in the Major header
  • Added PHARMACY 640 Substance Abuse and Chemical Dependence to the Pharmacy course list under the Electives in the Major header
  • Added ZOOLOGY 555 Laboratory in Developmental Biology to the Zoology course list under the Electives in the Major header
  • Removed Anatomy 619 from Biology Option A Upper-Level Biology course list
  • Added RADIOL/​B M E/​MED PHYS/​PHMCOL-M/​PHYSICS  619 to Biology Option A Upper-Level Biology course list
  • Changed BMOLCHEM 504 from 2 credits to 3 credits in Biology Option A Upper-Level Biology course list

Physics B.A. and B.S.

June 30, 2017
B.A. and B.S. Major Requirements

  • Deleted footnote #3 referenced to PHYSICS 249 and PHYSICS 307 and renumbered footnotes 4–7. Deleted text: Students registering for PHYSICS 249 A Modern Introduction to Physics are required to register concurrently for PHYSICS 307 Intermediate Laboratory-Mechanics and Modern Physics.

Political Science B.A. and B.S.

September 27, 2017
B.A. and B.S. Major Requirements

  • Removed POLI SCI 478 from the footnote 1

B.A. and B.S. Advising and Careers

  • Removed POLI SCI 478

Psychology B.A. and B.S.

September 27, 2017
B.A. and B.S. How to Get in

  • Changed the primary introductory course from Psych 201 to PSYCH 202 Introduction to Psychology.
  • Changed the equivalents footnote to include a score of 4 or 5 on the AP Psychology exam; Removed Psych 201 and Psych 281 from the footnote

B.A. and B.S. Major Requirements

  • Removed Psych 201 and Psych 281 from the Introductory Psychology list under the Foundation header
  • Add footnote to Introductory Psychology section; "A score of 4 or better on the IB Biology exam, or a score of 4 or 5 on the AP Biology exam will satisfy the Introductory Biology requirement."
  • Updated footnote on the Introductory Biology section; "A score of 4 or better on the IB Biology exam, or a score of 4 or 5 on the AP Biology exam will satisfy the Introductory Biology requirement."
  • Removed Psych 285 from Research Methods list under the Foundation header
  • Removed Psych 581, Psych 582, Psych 583, and Psych 586 from the Depth header

Psychology Minor

September 27, 2017
Requirements

  • Removed Psych 201

School of Business

September 27, 2017
Pre-Business Requirements

  • Removed PSYCH 201 and PSYCH 285 from the Pre-Business Psychology select from course list

School of Education 

September 7, 2017
Liberal Studies Requirements

  • Removed History 249 from the History–United States History section under the Cultural and Historical Studies header
  • Removed  HISTORY 306 and HISTORY/​E A STDS  363 from the History–European History section under the Cultural and Historical Studies header
  • Removed duplicate LCA/​HISTORY/​RELIG ST  205 from the Global Perspectives course list under the Cultural and Historical Studies header
  • Remove footnote from LITTRANS 374 from the Global Perspectives course list under the Cultural and Historical Studies header; the topic does not need to be approved

September 27, 2017
Liberal Studies Requirements

Social Welfare B.A. and B.S.

September 27, 2017
B.A. and B.S. Major Requirements

  • Removed PSYCH 488, PSYCH 581, PSYCH 582, PSYCH 583, PSYCH 586 from the Psychology course list

Social Work BSW

September 27, 2017
Major Requirements

  • Removed PSYCH 488, PSYCH 581, PSYCH 582, PSYCH 583, PSYCH 586 from the Psychology course list

Soil Science B.S.

June 13, 2017
Major Requirements

  • Removed the duplicated F&W ECOL 550 from the Living Environment course list under the Environmental Soil Science Specialization

Sociology Minor

September 27, 2017
Requirements

  • Remove Soc 350 from the Social Psychology course options under the Social Psychology header

Statistics B.A. and B.S.

June 30, 2017
B.A. and B.S. Major Requirements

  • Under the heading Computer Programming, added footnote #2 after "Select one of the following" and renumbered footnotes 2–4. Text of new footnote: COMP SCI 300 is highly recommended because it will be particularly beneficial in most future careers. Students who have prior computing experience equivalent to COMP SCI 200 (such as AP computer science) are recommended to take COMP SCI 300, and students who will pursue a second major in computer science must take COMP SCI 300 and COMP SCI 400 to satisfy the computer science major requirements. Removed COMP SCI 302 from course list; added COMP SCI 200, COMP SCI 300, and COMP SCI 400 to the list.

World Languages / Professional Sequence Course Requirements shared page

September 15, 2017

  • Semester 2, Required Course Requirements. Changed credit total for CURRIC 442 and CURRIC 443 changed from 3 to 6.