CALS_NutrSciences-calorimetry

The bachelor of science with a major in nutritional science builds on a core set of nutrition courses with additional courses emphasizing the chemistry and biology of nutrients from the molecular to the systemic level. Students in this program often pursue graduate study in medicine, nutritional sciences, and other biological sciences. Graduates also find employment in agribusiness, the food industry, government agencies, health fields, and human services. Others may pursue advanced degrees in nutrition, the health and social sciences, and international studies. Students concerned with food and nutrition problems of developing countries can also enroll in courses that treat the agricultural, environmental, economic, and social context of such problems with the nutrition core.

To declare this major, students must be admitted to UW–Madison and the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences (CALS). For information about becoming a CALS first-year or transfer student, see Entering the College.

Students who attend Student Orientation, Advising, and Registration (SOAR) with the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences have the option to declare this major at SOAR.  Students may otherwise declare after they have begun their undergraduate studies. For more information, contact the advisor listed under the Advising and Careers tab.

University General Education Requirements

All undergraduate students at the University of Wisconsin–Madison are required to fulfill a minimum set of common university general education requirements to ensure that every graduate acquires the essential core of an undergraduate education. This core establishes a foundation for living a productive life, being a citizen of the world, appreciating aesthetic values, and engaging in lifelong learning in a continually changing world. Various schools and colleges will have requirements in addition to the requirements listed below. Consult your advisor for assistance, as needed. For additional information, see the university Undergraduate General Education Requirements section of the Guide.

General Education
  • Breadth—Humanities/Literature/Arts: 6 credits
  • Breadth—Natural Science: 4 to 6 credits, consisting of one 4- or 5-credit course with a laboratory component; or two courses providing a total of 6 credits
  • Breadth—Social Studies: 3 credits
  • Communication Part A & Part B *
  • Ethnic Studies *
  • Quantitative Reasoning Part A & Part B *

* The mortarboard symbol appears before the title of any course that fulfills one of the Communication Part A or Part B, Ethnic Studies, or Quantitative Reasoning Part A or Part B requirements.

College of Agricultural and Life Sciences Requirements

In addition to the University General Education Requirements, all undergraduate students in CALS must satisfy a set of college and major requirements. Specific requirements for all majors in the college and other information on academic matters can be obtained from the Office of Academic Affairs, College of Agricultural and Life Sciences, 116 Agricultural Hall, 1450 Linden Drive, Madison, WI 53706; 608-262-3003. Academic departments and advisors also have information on requirements. Courses may not double count within university requirements (General Education and Breadth) or within college requirements (First-Year Seminar, International Studies and Science), but courses counted toward university requirements may also be used to satisfy a college and/or a major requirement; similarly, courses counted toward college requirements may also be used to satisfy a university and/or a major requirement.

College Requirements for all CALS B.S. Degree Programs

Quality of Work: Students must maintain a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.000 to remain in good standing and be eligible for graduation.
Residency: Students must complete 30 degree credits in residence at UW–Madison after earning 86 credits toward their undergraduate degree.
First Year Seminar1
International Studies3
Physical Science Fundamentals4-5
General Chemistry I
Chemistry in Our World
Advanced General Chemistry
Biological Science5
Additional Science (Biological, Physical, or Natural)3
Science Breadth (Biological, Physical, Natural, or Social)3
CALS Capstone Learning Experience: included in the requirements for each CALS major (see "Major Requirements")

Major Requirements

Mathematics and Statistics
Select one of the following (or may be satisfied by placement exam):5-6
Algebra
and Trigonometry
Algebra and Trigonometry
Calculus with Algebra and Trigonometry I 1
Select one of the following:3-5
Topics in Finite Mathematics
Calculus
Calculus with Algebra and Trigonometry II 1
Calculus and Analytic Geometry 1
Calculus and Analytic Geometry 2
Introductory Statistics for Engineers
Introduction to Statistical Methods
Introductory Applied Statistics for the Life Sciences
Introduction to Biostatistics
Statistical Methods for Bioscience I
Chemistry
Select one of the following:5-9
General Chemistry I
and General Chemistry II
Advanced General Chemistry
CHEM 343 Introductory Organic Chemistry3
CHEM 344 Introductory Organic Chemistry Laboratory2
CHEM 345 Intermediate Organic Chemistry3
Introductory Biology
Select one of the following options:10
Option 1:
General Botany
Animal Biology
Animal Biology Laboratory
Option 2:
Introductory Biology
Introductory Biology
Option 3:
Evolution, Ecology, and Genetics
Evolution, Ecology, and Genetics Laboratory
Cellular Biology
Cellular Biology Laboratory
Nutritional Sciences Biology
Select one of the following options:8-13
Option 1:
Physiology
Principles of Genetics
And select one of the following: 2
General Microbiology
and General Microbiology Laboratory
Biology of Microorganisms
and Biology of Microorganisms Laboratory
Option 2: 3
Organismal Biology
Organismal Biology Laboratory
Biological Interactions
Physics
Select one of the following:8-10
General Physics
and General Physics
General Physics
and General Physics
General Physics
and General Physics
Core
NUTR SCI/​AN SCI/​DY SCI  311 Comparative Animal Nutrition3
or NUTR SCI 332 Human Nutritional Needs
NUTR SCI 431 Nutrition in the Life Span3
BIOCHEM/NUTR SCI 510 Biochemical Principles of Human and Animal Nutrition3
Select one of the following:3-7
Introduction to Biochemistry
General Biochemistry I
and General Biochemistry II
Human Biochemistry
Electives within the Major
Select 6 credits from the following:6
World Hunger and Malnutrition
Medical Anthropology
Topics in Medical Biochemistry
Biology of Viruses 4
Molecular Control of Metabolism and Metabolic Disease 5
Human Biochemistry Laboratory
Public Health in Rural & Urban Communities
Chemistry Across the Periodic Table
Fundamentals of Analytical Science
Fundamentals of Analytical Science
Lactation Physiology
Food Laws and Regulations
Food Microbiology
Genetics Laboratory
Plant Breeding and Biotechnology
Plant Biotechnology: Principles and Techniques I
Genetically Modified Crops: Science, Regulation & Controversy
Human Anatomy
Human Anatomy Laboratory
Public Health Ethics
Ethical Issues in Health Care
Immunology
Immunology Laboratory
Special Topics
Global Health Field Experience
Undergraduate Capstone Seminar Laboratory
Nutrition in Physical Activity and Health
Community Nutrition Programs and Policy Issues
Advanced Nutrition: Intermediary Metabolism of Macronutrients 4
Introduction to Nutritional Epidemiology 4
Advanced Nutrition: Minerals 4
Advanced Nutrition: Obesity and Diabetes 4
Experimental Diet Design 4
Advanced Nutrition: Vitamins 4
Clinical Nutrition
Herbals, Homeopathy, and Dietary Supplements
Senior Honors Thesis 5
Senior Honors Thesis 5
Senior Thesis-Nutrition 5
Senior Thesis 5
Special Problems 6
Introduction to Experimental Oncology
Pathophysiologic Principles of Human Diseases
Survey of Pharmacology
Molecular Physiology
Introduction to Public Health: Local to Global Perspectives
Introduction to Animal Development
Cell Biology
Capstone
Select one of the following:1-8
Capstone in Nutrition
Undergraduate Capstone Seminar Laboratory
Senior Honors Thesis
and Senior Honors Thesis
Senior Thesis-Nutrition
and Senior Thesis
Special Problems 7
Total Credits66-91
1

If MATH 171 Calculus with Algebra and Trigonometry I is taken, students must take MATH 217 Calculus with Algebra and Trigonometry II.

2

Consult advisor about combining MICROBIO 303 with MICROBIO 102.

3

If the Biocore sequence is taken to fulfill the first biology requirement, it must be taken to fulfill the second biology requirement.

4

These courses are taught primarily to graduate students. Permission to enroll from instructor may be required.

5

Note that for NUTR SCI 681/NUTR SCI 682 (Senior Honors Thesis) and NUTR SCI 691/NUTR SCI 692 (Senior Thesis), both courses in the sequence must be completed in order to earn a grade.

6

May count up to 3 credits of NUTR SCI 699 Special Problems towards the electives requirement

7

Consult advisor regarding the possibility of completing NUTR SCI 699 Special Problems for capstone.

Recommended Nutritional Science Electives

ANATOMY/​KINES  328 Human Anatomy3
BIOCHEM 550 Topics in Medical Biochemistry2
C&E SOC/​SOC  222 Food, Culture, and Society3
FOOD SCI/​MICROBIO  324 Food Microbiology Laboratory2
FOOD SCI/​MICROBIO  325 Food Microbiology3
FOOD SCI 410 Food Chemistry3
M M & I/​MICROBIO/​PATH-BIO  528 Immunology3
MED HIST/​ENVIR ST  213 Global Environmental Health: An Interdisciplinary Introduction3
NUTR SCI/​AGRONOMY/​ENTOM  203 Introduction to Global Health3
NUTR SCI/​KINES  525 Nutrition in Physical Activity and Health3
NUTR SCI/​POP HLTH  621 Introduction to Nutritional Epidemiology1
NUTR SCI/​PHM PRAC  672 Herbals, Homeopathy, and Dietary Supplements2-3
ONCOLOGY 401 Introduction to Experimental Oncology2
PATH 404 Pathophysiologic Principles of Human Diseases3
PHM SCI 401 Survey of Pharmacology3
POP HLTH 370 Introduction to Public Health: Local to Global Perspectives3
SOC 531 Sociology of Medicine3
ZOOLOGY 570 Cell Biology3
ZOOLOGY/​BIOCHEM/​PHMCOL-M  630 Cellular Signal Transduction Mechanisms3

Honors in the Major

To earn Honors in the Major, students are required to take at least 20 honors credits. In addition, students must take NUTR SCI 681 Senior Honors Thesis and NUTR SCI 682 Senior Honors Thesis when completing their thesis project; please see the Honors in Major Checklist for more information.

University Degree Requirements 

Total Degree To receive a bachelor's degree from UW–Madison, students must earn a minimum of 120 degree credits. The requirements for some programs may exceed 120 degree credits. Students should consult with their college or department advisor for information on specific credit requirements.
Residency Degree candidates are required to earn a minimum of 30 credits in residence at UW–Madison. "In residence" means on the UW–Madison campus with an undergraduate degree classification. “In residence” credit also includes UW–Madison courses offered in distance or online formats and credits earned in UW–Madison Study Abroad/Study Away programs.
Quality of Work Undergraduate students must maintain the minimum grade point average specified by the school, college, or academic program to remain in good academic standing. Students whose academic performance drops below these minimum thresholds will be placed on academic probation.
  1. Obtains and can articulate specialized knowledge in the field of nutritional sciences and dietetics along with an education broad enough to meet the challenges of future careers and opportunities.
  2. Obtains and can articulate foundational knowledge in areas relevant to the field of nutrition and dietetics.
  3. Communicates complex ideas in a clear and understandable manner through both written and oral presentations.
  4. Demonstrates quantitative literacy in math and statistics relevant to nutritional sciences and dietetics.
  5. Demonstrates the ability to think critically and creatively, to synthesize, analyze, and integrate ideas for decision making and problem solving.
  6. Develops the skills for life-­long learning and is capable of locating, interpreting, and critically evaluating professional literature and current research.
  7. Develops a global perspective and an appreciation for the interdependencies among individuals and their workplaces, communities, environments, and world; and an understanding of the interrelationships between science and society.
  8. Develops a respect for truth, a tolerance for diverse views, and a strong sense of personal and professional ethics.

Four-year plan

Sample Nutritional Sciences Four-Year Plan

Freshman
FallCreditsSpringCredits
MATH 112, 114, or 2113-5CHEM 10415
CHEM 103 or 10914-5ZOOLOGY/​BIOLOGY  101
ZOOLOGY/​BIOLOGY  1023
5
COMM A3MATH 113 (if needed)3
First Year Seminar1ANTHRO 10443
Elective23 
 14-17 16
Total Credits 30-33
Sophomore
FallCreditsSpringCredits
CHEM 3433CHEM 344 or 3452
PHYSIOL 33535NUTR SCI 3323
ZOOLOGY/​BIOLOGY/​BOTANY  152 or BOTANY 13035COMM B3
MATH 211, 221, STAT 301, or STAT 3713-5Elective23
 16-18 11
Total Credits 27-29
Junior
FallCreditsSpringCredits
BIOCHEM 501 or 507 (if taking BIOCHEM 507, take BIOCHEM 508 in spring)3PHYSICS 104, 202, or 2084
PHYSICS 103, 201, or 2074-5NUTR SCI 4313
Electives29MICROBIO 101 or 30333
 MICROBIO 102 or 30432
 Elective23
 16-17 15
Total Credits 31-32
Senior
FallCreditsSpringCredits
GENETICS 46633Capstone Experience1-3
NUTR SCI/​BIOCHEM  5103CHEM 327, 329, or 3114
NUTR SCI Elective53Electives29
Electives26 
 15 14-16
Total Credits 29-31
1

CHEM 103/CHEM 104 or CHEM 109 is required.

2

UW and CALS general education requirements are listed on the Requirements tab. Other recommended electives: Math through MATH 222 (second semester calculus), CHEM 561 Physical Chemistry, and foreign language.

3

BIOCORE 381/BIOCORE 382, BIOCORE 383/BIOCORE 384, BIOCORE 485/BIOCORE 486, BIOCORE 587 also accepted.

4

ANTHRO 104 fulfills both the Ethnic Studies and International Studies requirements.

5

Select 3 credits from NUTR SCI/​A A E/​AGRONOMY/​INTER-AG  350, NUTR SCI 540, NUTR SCI 631, NUTR SCI/​PHM PRAC  672, NUTR SCI 681, NUTR SCI 682, NUTR SCI 691, NUTR SCI 692, NUTR SCI 699, FOOD SCI/​MICROBIO  325, FOOD SCI 410, FOOD SCI 412 or FOOD SCI 514.

  • 120 credits required for graduation.

Prospective and declared students should contact the student services coordinator with questions.

Students in this program often pursue graduate study in medicine, nutritional sciences, and other biological sciences. Graduates also find employment in agribusiness, the food industry, government agencies, health fields, and human services. Others may pursue advanced degrees in nutrition, the health and social sciences, and international studies.

Professors

Eide (chair), Eisenstein, Groblewski, Lai, Ney, Ntambi, Smith, Sunde, Tanumihardjo

Associate Professor

Olson

Assistant Professors

Parks, Yen

Distinguished Faculty Associate

Karls

Faculty Associate

Thurlow

Assistant Faculty Associate

Schuchardt

Senior Lecturer

Anderson