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The environmental sciences major satisfies the growing demand among entry-level students for a rigorous, science-based program that promotes critical thinking and emphasizes environmental problem solving in service to society. The program is designed to prepare graduates who will be highly competitive for entry-level positions in nonprofit and private sectors, and for master’s programs and doctoral research programs in environmental fields. Possible career paths include environmental monitoring, consulting, education, research, and planning, as well as natural resource management, ecology restoration, remediation, water and air quality assessment, sustainability practices, and more. Undergraduates in environmental sciences prepare for a variety of career and graduate school opportunities that require a strong background in the natural sciences. Foundational course work in the major includes calculus, biology, chemistry, and physics. Core and elective course work is fulfilled through diverse offerings from both the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences, and the College of Letters & Science.

The environmental sciences major can be earned in either the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences (CALS) or the College of Letters & Science (L&S) under the bachelor of science (B.S.) or bachelor of arts (B.A.) degree program. An undergraduate B.S. degree is offered through both colleges. A B.A. option is offered through L&S only. Students are encouraged to review the degree requirements for both L&S and CALS and choose the college from which they would prefer to earn their degree; students may choose only one degree "home."

  • In CALS, the major is housed administratively in the Department of Soil Science.
  • In L&S, the major is housed administratively in the Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences.

The major can be taken as a stand-alone or as a double major with a variety of other majors on campus including environmental studies, life sciences communication, agronomy, soil science, landscape architecture, foreign language/culture, and a number of other disciplines.

Up-to-date information, curriculum, and requirements are posted at envirosci.cals.wisc.edu

Students wishing to declare the environmental sciences major should meet with an academic advisor. Contact information for advisors can be found here.

CALS undergraduate students interested in pursuing the environmental sciences major in the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences should contact Kathryn Jones, kjones26@wisc.edu or 608-807-7391.

L&S undergraduate students interested in pursuing the environmental sciences major in the College of Letters & Science should contact Professor Jonathan Martin in the Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, jemarti1@wisc.edu or 608-262-9845.

University General Education Requirements

All undergraduate students at the University of Wisconsin–Madison are required to fulfill a minimum set of common university general education requirements to ensure that every graduate acquires the essential core of an undergraduate education. This core establishes a foundation for living a productive life, being a citizen of the world, appreciating aesthetic values, and engaging in lifelong learning in a continually changing world. Various schools and colleges will have requirements in addition to the requirements listed below. Consult your advisor for assistance, as needed. For additional information, see the university Undergraduate General Education Requirements section of the Guide.

General Education
  • Breadth—Humanities/Literature/Arts: 6 credits
  • Breadth—Natural Science: 4 to 6 credits, consisting of one 4- or 5-credit course with a laboratory component; or two courses providing a total of 6 credits
  • Breadth—Social Studies: 3 credits
  • Communication Part A & Part B *
  • Ethnic Studies *
  • Quantitative Reasoning Part A & Part B *

* The mortarboard symbol appears before the title of any course that fulfills one of the Communication Part A or Part B, Ethnic Studies, or Quantitative Reasoning Part A or Part B requirements.

College of Agricultural and Life Sciences Requirements

In addition to the University General Education Requirements, all undergraduate students in CALS must satisfy a set of college and major requirements. Specific requirements for all majors in the college and other information on academic matters can be obtained from the Office of Academic Affairs, College of Agricultural and Life Sciences, 116 Agricultural Hall, 1450 Linden Drive, Madison, WI 53706; 608-262-3003. Academic departments and advisors also have information on requirements. Courses may not double count within university requirements (General Education and Breadth) or within college requirements (First-Year Seminar, International Studies and Science), but courses counted toward university requirements may also be used to satisfy a college and/or a major requirement; similarly, courses counted toward college requirements may also be used to satisfy a university and/or a major requirement.

College Requirements for all CALS B.S. Degree Programs

Quality of Work: Students must maintain a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.000 to remain in good standing and be eligible for graduation.
Residency: Students must complete 30 degree credits in residence at UW–Madison after earning 86 credits toward their undergraduate degree.
First Year Seminar1
International Studies3
Physical Science Fundamentals4-5
General Chemistry I
Chemistry in Our World
Advanced General Chemistry
Biological Science5
Additional Science (Biological, Physical, or Natural)3
Science Breadth (Biological, Physical, Natural, or Social)3
CALS Capstone Learning Experience: included in the requirements for each CALS major (see "Major Requirements")

Requirements for the Major

Courses may not double count within the major (unless specifically noted otherwise), but courses counted toward the major requirements may also be used to satisfy a university requirement and/or a college requirement. A minimum of 15 credits must be completed in the major that are not used elsewhere.

Mathematics & Statistics8-13
Chemistry8-12
Biology8-10
Physics8-10
Major Foundation3-5
Major Core12
Major Electives12
Capstone2-6
Total Credits61-80

 Mathematics and Statistics

This major requires calculus. Prerequisites may need to be taken before enrollment in calculus. Refer to the Course Guide for information about calculus prerequisites.

Select one of the following:5-10
Calculus and Analytic Geometry 1 (Recommended)
Calculus with Algebra and Trigonometry I
and Calculus with Algebra and Trigonometry II
Calculus
Select one of the following:3
Introductory Statistics for Engineers
Accelerated Introduction to Statistical Methods
Introduction to Probability and Mathematical Statistics I
Introduction to Theory and Methods of Mathematical Statistics I
Introductory Applied Statistics for the Life Sciences
Total Credits8-13

Chemistry 

CHEM 103
CHEM 104
General Chemistry I
and General Chemistry II
5-9
or CHEM 109 Advanced General Chemistry
Select one of the following:3
Elementary Organic Chemistry
Introductory Organic Chemistry
Physical Chemistry
Total Credits8-12

Biology

Select one of the following:10
Introductory Biology
and Introductory Biology
General Botany
and Animal Biology
and Animal Biology Laboratory
Evolution, Ecology, and Genetics
and Evolution, Ecology, and Genetics Laboratory
and Cellular Biology
and Cellular Biology Laboratory
Total Credits10

Physics

Select on of the following:8-10
General Physics
and General Physics (Recommended)
General Physics
and General Physics
General Physics
and General Physics
Total Credits8-10

Major Foundation

Select one of the following:3-5
Principles of Environmental Science
Physical Systems of the Environment
Introduction to the Earth System
Environmental Geology
Soil: Ecosystem and Resource
Total Credits3-5

Major Core

Select at least 3 credits from each of the following subsets:

Ecology

AGRONOMY 300 Cropping Systems3
AGRONOMY/​BOTANY/​SOIL SCI  370 Grassland Ecology3
BOTANY/​F&W ECOL  455 The Vegetation of Wisconsin4
BOTANY/​F&W ECOL/​ZOOLOGY  460 General Ecology (Recommended)4
ENTOM 450 Basic and Applied Insect Ecology3
ENTOM 451 Basic and Applied Insect Ecology Laboratory1
ENTOM/​BOTANY/​ZOOLOGY  473 Plant-Insect Interactions3
ENVIR ST/​ZOOLOGY  510 Ecology of Fishes3
ENVIR ST/​ZOOLOGY  511 Ecology of Fishes Lab2
F&W ECOL/​ENVIR ST/​ZOOLOGY  360 Extinction of Species3
F&W ECOL 550 Forest Ecology3
F&W ECOL 551 Forest Ecology Lab1
F&W ECOL/​LAND ARC/​ZOOLOGY  565 Principles of Landscape Ecology2
HORT 334 Greenhouse Cultivation2
HORT 335 Greenhouse Cultivation Lab1
LAND ARC/​ENVIR ST  361 Wetlands Ecology3
ZOOLOGY/​ENVIR ST  315 Limnology-Conservation of Aquatic Resources2
ZOOLOGY 316 Laboratory for Limnology-Conservation of Aquatic Resources2-3

Physical Environment

ATM OCN 310 Dynamics of the Atmosphere and Ocean I3
ATM OCN/​GEOG  323 Science of Climate Change3
ATM OCN/​ENVIR ST/​GEOG  331 Climatic Environments of the Past3
ATM OCN/​ENVIR ST  520 Bioclimatology3
ATM OCN/​ENVIR ST  535 Atmospheric Dispersion and Air Pollution3
BSE 365 Measurements and Instrumentation for Biological Systems3
BSE/​ENVIR ST  367 Renewable Energy Systems3
BSE 460 Biorefining: Energy and Products from Renewable Resources3
CIV ENGR 310 Fluid Mechanics3
CIV ENGR 320 Environmental Engineering3
CIV ENGR 423 Air Pollution Effects, Measurement and Control3
CIV ENGR 424 Environmental Engineering Laboratory2
ENVIR ST/​POP HLTH  502 Air Pollution and Human Health3
GEOG/​GEOSCI  320 Geomorphology3
GEOG 321 Climatology3
GEOG/​ENVIR ST  325 Analysis of the Physical Environment4
GEOG 329 Landforms and Landscapes of North America3
GEOG/​ATM OCN/​ENVIR ST  332 Global Warming: Science and Impacts3
GEOG/​BOTANY  338 Environmental Biogeography3
GEOG/​GEOSCI  524 Advanced Landform Geography3
GEOSCI 304 Geobiology3
GEOSCI/​G L E  627 Hydrogeology3-4
SOIL SCI 301 General Soil Science4
SOIL SCI 321 Soils and Environmental Chemistry3
SOIL SCI/​ENVIR ST  324 Soils and Environmental Quality3
SOIL SCI/​F&W ECOL  451 Environmental Biogeochemistry3
SOIL SCI/​AGRONOMY/​ATM OCN  532 Environmental Biophysics3

Geospatial Sciences

COMP SCI 301 Introduction to Data Programming3
GEOG 360 Quantitative Methods in Geographical Analysis4
GEOG 370 Introduction to Cartography4
GEOG/​ENVIR ST/​F&W ECOL/​G L E/​GEOSCI/​LAND ARC  371 Introduction to Environmental Remote Sensing3
GEOG/​CIV ENGR/​ENVIR ST  377 An Introduction to Geographic Information Systems4
GEOSCI/​CIV ENGR/​ENVIR ST/​G L E  444 Practical Applications of GPS Surveying2
SOIL SCI/​ENVIR ST/​LAND ARC  695 Applications of Geographic Information Systems in Natural Resources3

Environmental Policy & Social Perspectives

A A E/​ECON/​ENVIR ST  343 Environmental Economics3-4
A A E/​ENVIR ST  244 The Environment and the Global Economy3
C&E SOC/​F&W ECOL/​SOC  248 Environment, Natural Resources, and Society3
C&E SOC/​ENVIR ST/​GEOG  434 People, Wildlife and Landscapes3
C&E SOC/​ENVIR ST/​SOC  540 Sociology of International Development, Environment, and Sustainability3
C&E SOC/​SOC  541 Environmental Stewardship and Social Justice3
ENVIR ST/​M&ENVTOX/​PL PATH  368 Environmental Law, Toxic Substances, and Conservation2
ENVIR ST/​GEOG  439 US Environmental Policy and Regulation3-4
ENVIR ST/​PHILOS  441 Environmental Ethics3-4
ENVIR ST/​HIST SCI/​MED HIST  513 Environment and Health in Global Perspective3
GEOG/​ENVIR ST  339 Environmental Conservation4
GEOG/​ENVIR ST/​HISTORY  460 American Environmental History4
GEOG/​ENVIR ST  537 Culture and Environment4
GEOSCI/​ENVIR ST  410 Minerals as a Public Problem3
GEOSCI/​ENVIR ST  411 Energy Resources3
POLI SCI 510 Politics of Government Regulation3-4
URB R PL/​ECON/​ENVIR ST/​POLI SCI  449 Government and Natural Resources3-4

Major Electives 

Select one of two tracks:

Distributed Electives

Students choosing the Distributed Electives path must complete a total of 12 credits of Environmental Sciences Electives from the categories below, including at least one course from each category.

Ecology

AGRONOMY 300 Cropping Systems3
AGRONOMY/​BOTANY/​SOIL SCI  370 Grassland Ecology3
BOTANY/​F&W ECOL  455 The Vegetation of Wisconsin4
BOTANY/​F&W ECOL/​ZOOLOGY  460 General Ecology4
ENTOM/​BOTANY/​ZOOLOGY  473 Plant-Insect Interactions3
ENTOM 450 Basic and Applied Insect Ecology3
ENTOM 451 Basic and Applied Insect Ecology Laboratory1
ENVIR ST/​ZOOLOGY  510 Ecology of Fishes3
ENVIR ST/​ZOOLOGY  511 Ecology of Fishes Lab2
F&W ECOL/​ENVIR ST/​ZOOLOGY  360 Extinction of Species3
F&W ECOL 550 Forest Ecology3
F&W ECOL 551 Forest Ecology Lab1
F&W ECOL/​LAND ARC/​ZOOLOGY  565 Principles of Landscape Ecology2
F&W ECOL/​ZOOLOGY  660 Climate Change Ecology3
HORT 334 Greenhouse Cultivation2
HORT 335 Greenhouse Cultivation Lab1
LAND ARC/​ENVIR ST  361 Wetlands Ecology3
ZOOLOGY/​ENVIR ST  315 Limnology-Conservation of Aquatic Resources2
ZOOLOGY 316 Laboratory for Limnology-Conservation of Aquatic Resources2-3

Physical Environment

ATM OCN 310 Dynamics of the Atmosphere and Ocean I3
ATM OCN/​GEOG  323 Science of Climate Change3
ATM OCN/​ENVIR ST/​GEOG  331 Climatic Environments of the Past3
ATM OCN/​ENVIR ST  520 Bioclimatology3
ATM OCN/​ENVIR ST  535 Atmospheric Dispersion and Air Pollution3
BSE 365 Measurements and Instrumentation for Biological Systems3
BSE/​ENVIR ST  367 Renewable Energy Systems3
BSE 460 Biorefining: Energy and Products from Renewable Resources3
CIV ENGR 311 Hydroscience3
CIV ENGR 320 Environmental Engineering3
CIV ENGR 423 Air Pollution Effects, Measurement and Control3
CIV ENGR 424 Environmental Engineering Laboratory2
ENVIR ST/​POP HLTH  502 Air Pollution and Human Health3
GEOG/​GEOSCI  320 Geomorphology3
GEOG 321 Climatology3
GEOG/​ENVIR ST  325 Analysis of the Physical Environment4
GEOG 329 Landforms and Landscapes of North America3
GEOG/​ATM OCN/​ENVIR ST  332 Global Warming: Science and Impacts3
GEOG/​BOTANY  338 Environmental Biogeography3
GEOG/​GEOSCI  524 Advanced Landform Geography3
GEOSCI 304 Geobiology3
GEOSCI/​G L E  627 Hydrogeology3-4
SOIL SCI 301 General Soil Science4
SOIL SCI 321 Soils and Environmental Chemistry3
SOIL SCI/​ENVIR ST  324 Soils and Environmental Quality3
SOIL SCI/​F&W ECOL  451 Environmental Biogeochemistry3
SOIL SCI/​AGRONOMY/​ATM OCN  532 Environmental Biophysics3

Geospatial Sciences

GEOG 360 Quantitative Methods in Geographical Analysis4
GEOG 370 Introduction to Cartography4
GEOG/​ENVIR ST/​F&W ECOL/​G L E/​GEOSCI/​LAND ARC  372 Intermediate Environmental Remote Sensing3
GEOG/​CIV ENGR/​ENVIR ST  377 An Introduction to Geographic Information Systems4
GEOG 378 Introduction to Geocomputing4
GEOG 560 Advanced Quantitative Methods3
GEOG 577 Environmental Modeling with GIS3
GEOG 578 GIS Applications4
GEOG 579 GIS and Spatial Analysis4
GEOSCI/​CIV ENGR/​ENVIR ST/​G L E  444 Practical Applications of GPS Surveying2
SOIL SCI/​ENVIR ST/​LAND ARC  695 Applications of Geographic Information Systems in Natural Resources3

Area of Focus

Students choosing the Focused Electives path must complete a total of 12 credits of Environmental Sciences Electives from one of the following categories.1

Ecology

AGRONOMY 300 Cropping Systems3
AGRONOMY/​BOTANY/​SOIL SCI  370 Grassland Ecology3
BOTANY/​F&W ECOL  455 The Vegetation of Wisconsin4
BOTANY/​F&W ECOL/​ZOOLOGY  460 General Ecology4
ENTOM/​BOTANY/​ZOOLOGY  473 Plant-Insect Interactions3
ENTOM 450 Basic and Applied Insect Ecology3
ENTOM 451 Basic and Applied Insect Ecology Laboratory1
ENVIR ST/​ZOOLOGY  510 Ecology of Fishes3
ENVIR ST/​ZOOLOGY  511 Ecology of Fishes Lab2
F&W ECOL/​ENVIR ST/​ZOOLOGY  360 Extinction of Species3
F&W ECOL 550 Forest Ecology3
F&W ECOL 551 Forest Ecology Lab1
F&W ECOL/​LAND ARC/​ZOOLOGY  565 Principles of Landscape Ecology2
F&W ECOL/​ZOOLOGY  660 Climate Change Ecology3
HORT 334 Greenhouse Cultivation2
HORT 335 Greenhouse Cultivation Lab1
LAND ARC/​ENVIR ST  361 Wetlands Ecology3
ZOOLOGY/​ENVIR ST  315 Limnology-Conservation of Aquatic Resources2
ZOOLOGY 316 Laboratory for Limnology-Conservation of Aquatic Resources2-3

Physical Environment

ATM OCN 310 Dynamics of the Atmosphere and Ocean I3
ATM OCN/​GEOG  323 Science of Climate Change3
ATM OCN/​ENVIR ST/​GEOG  331 Climatic Environments of the Past3
ATM OCN/​ENVIR ST  520 Bioclimatology3
ATM OCN/​ENVIR ST  535 Atmospheric Dispersion and Air Pollution3
BSE 365 Measurements and Instrumentation for Biological Systems3
BSE/​ENVIR ST  367 Renewable Energy Systems3
BSE 460 Biorefining: Energy and Products from Renewable Resources3
CIV ENGR 311 Hydroscience3
CIV ENGR 320 Environmental Engineering3
CIV ENGR 423 Air Pollution Effects, Measurement and Control3
CIV ENGR 424 Environmental Engineering Laboratory2
ENVIR ST/​POP HLTH  502 Air Pollution and Human Health3
GEOG/​GEOSCI  320 Geomorphology3
GEOG 321 Climatology3
GEOG/​ENVIR ST  325 Analysis of the Physical Environment4
GEOG 329 Landforms and Landscapes of North America3
GEOG/​ATM OCN/​ENVIR ST  332 Global Warming: Science and Impacts3
GEOG/​BOTANY  338 Environmental Biogeography3
GEOG/​GEOSCI  524 Advanced Landform Geography3
GEOSCI 304 Geobiology3
GEOSCI/​G L E  627 Hydrogeology3-4
SOIL SCI 301 General Soil Science4
SOIL SCI 321 Soils and Environmental Chemistry3
SOIL SCI/​ENVIR ST  324 Soils and Environmental Quality3
SOIL SCI/​F&W ECOL  451 Environmental Biogeochemistry3
SOIL SCI/​AGRONOMY/​ATM OCN  532 Environmental Biophysics3

Geospatial Sciences

GEOG 360 Quantitative Methods in Geographical Analysis4
GEOG 370 Introduction to Cartography4
GEOG/​ENVIR ST/​F&W ECOL/​G L E/​GEOSCI/​LAND ARC  372 Intermediate Environmental Remote Sensing3
GEOG/​CIV ENGR/​ENVIR ST  377 An Introduction to Geographic Information Systems4
GEOG 378 Introduction to Geocomputing4
GEOG 560 Advanced Quantitative Methods3
GEOG 577 Environmental Modeling with GIS3
GEOG 578 GIS Applications4
GEOG 579 GIS and Spatial Analysis4
GEOSCI/​CIV ENGR/​ENVIR ST/​G L E  444 Practical Applications of GPS Surveying2
SOIL SCI/​ENVIR ST/​LAND ARC  695 Applications of Geographic Information Systems in Natural Resources3

Environmental Policy & Social Perspectives 

A A E/​ECON/​ENVIR ST  343 Environmental Economics3-4
A A E/​ENVIR ST  244 The Environment and the Global Economy3
C&E SOC/​F&W ECOL/​SOC  248 Environment, Natural Resources, and Society3
C&E SOC/​ENVIR ST/​GEOG  434 People, Wildlife and Landscapes3
C&E SOC/​ENVIR ST/​SOC  540 Sociology of International Development, Environment, and Sustainability3
C&E SOC/​SOC  541 Environmental Stewardship and Social Justice3
ENVIR ST/​M&ENVTOX/​PL PATH  368 Environmental Law, Toxic Substances, and Conservation2
ENVIR ST/​GEOG  439 US Environmental Policy and Regulation3-4
ENVIR ST/​PHILOS  441 Environmental Ethics3-4
ENVIR ST/​HIST SCI/​MED HIST  513 Environment and Health in Global Perspective3
GEOG/​ENVIR ST  339 Environmental Conservation4
GEOG/​ENVIR ST/​HISTORY  460 American Environmental History4
GEOG/​ENVIR ST  537 Culture and Environment4
GEOSCI/​ENVIR ST  410 Minerals as a Public Problem3
GEOSCI/​ENVIR ST  411 Energy Resources3
POLI SCI 510 Politics of Government Regulation3-4
URB R PL/​ECON/​ENVIR ST/​POLI SCI  449 Government and Natural Resources3-4
1

Consult environmental sciences advisor regarding alternate ways to complete the major electives.

CAPSTONE 1

 

AGRONOMY 500 Senior Capstone Experience2
BOTANY/​ENVIR ST/​F&W ECOL/​ZOOLOGY  651 Conservation Biology3
ENVIR ST/​SOIL SCI  575 Assessment of Environmental Impact3
F&W ECOL 577 Complexity and Conservation of White-tailed Deer3
F&W ECOL 590 Integrated Resource Management3
F&W ECOL 599 Wildlife Research Capstone3
F&W ECOL/​A A E/​ENVIR ST  652 Decision Methods for Natural Resource Managers3-4
LAND ARC 551 Senior Project in Landscape Architecture4
LAND ARC 666 Restoration Ecology3
SOIL SCI 499 Soil Management3

1

Students may speak with their environmental science advisor about alternatives (e.g., courses, directed study, senior thesis) to complete the Capstone. To be approved, the alternative must be taken for a minimum of 3 credits, clearly focused on environmental science, and approved by the Environmental Sciences Administrative Committee. Students must consult with their environmental sciences advisor and fill out all necessary paperwork before registering.

University Degree Requirements  

Total Degree To receive a bachelor's degree from UW–Madison, students must earn a minimum of 120 degree credits. The requirements for some programs may exceed 120 degree credits. Students should consult with their college or department advisor for information on specific credit requirements.
Residency Degree candidates are required to earn a minimum of 30 credits in residence at UW–Madison. "In residence" means on the UW–Madison campus with an undergraduate degree classification. “In residence” credit also includes UW–Madison courses offered in distance or online formats and credits earned in UW–Madison Study Abroad/Study Away programs.
Quality of Work Undergraduate students must maintain the minimum grade point average specified by the school, college, or academic program to remain in good academic standing. Students whose academic performance drops below these minimum thresholds will be placed on academic probation.
  1. Demonstrate understanding of Environmental Science fundamentals in the context of biology, chemistry, mathematics, statistics, and physics.
  2. Demonstrate a quantitative and qualitative understanding of the ecological relationships (material and energetic) between organisms, both as individuals and in groups, and their biotic and abiotic environment. This may include processes influencing the distribution and abundance of organisms.
  3. Demonstrate a quantitative and qualitative understanding of the physical, largely abiotic, conditions (e.g. climate, water, soil, air, noise, greenspace, etc.) of the environment. The physical environment can include natural or managed settings such as urban environments.
  4. Demonstrate a quantitative and qualitative understanding of geospatial processes and information as it relates to the environment including how to collect, interpret, and analyze geospatial information regarding the features of the Earth's surface. These technologies may include geographic information systems (GIS), the global positioning system (GPS), digital maps, and satellite based remote sensing.
  5. Demonstrate a basic understanding of relationships that focus on the organization and implementation of laws, regulations, and other policy mechanisms concerning environmental issues and sustainability and their effect on society. This includes how human behaviors influences, and are also influenced by, the natural environment.
  6. Apply skills in critical thinking, problem identification and resolution of a complex environmental issues that require interdisciplinary solutions and team-based work.
  7. Articulate the role of environmental science in one or more focused areas of a specific environmental discipline (e.g. geology, soils, atmosphere, water, plants, animals). 
  8. Demonstrate expertise in organizing and presenting (written and oral) scientific information to both lay and professional audiences.

Four-year plan

Sample  Environmental Sciences Four-Year Plan

Freshman
FallCreditsSpringCredits
CHEM 103 or 1094-5CHEM 1045
MATH 114 or 1715MATH 221 or 2175
First Year Seminar1COMM A Course3
Humanities / Literature / Arts Course3Ethnic Studies Course3
 13-14 16
Total Credits 29-30
Sophomore
FallCreditsSpringCredits
BIOLOGY/​BOTANY/​ZOOLOGY  151 or BOTANY 1305ZOOLOGY/​BIOLOGY  101
ZOOLOGY/​BIOLOGY  102 (or ZOOLOGY 152)
5
CHEM 341, 343, or 5613STAT 3713
International Studies Course3Environmental Sciences Foundation Course3
Electives / Social Sciences Course3-4Humanities / Literature / Arts Course3-4
 14-15 14-15
Total Credits 28-30
Junior
FallCreditsSpringCredits
PHYSICS 207, 201, or 1034-5PHYSICS 208, 202, or 1044-5
Major Core Courses3-6Major Core Courses3-6
Electives / Other Courses8+Electives / Other Courses8+
 7-19 7-19
Total Credits 14-38
Senior
FallCreditsSpringCredits
Environmental Sciences Major Elective Courses6-9Environmental Sciences Major Elective Courses3-6
Finish Major Core Courses0-6Electives / Other Courses9+
Capstone2-6 
Electives / Other Courses6+ 
 8-27 3-15
Total Credits 11-42
1

Completion of BIOLOGY/​BOTANY/​ZOOLOGY  152 fulfills the COMM B university requirement.

Advising

Students wishing to declare the environmental sciences major should meet with an academic advisor. Contact information for advisors can be found here.

CALS undergraduate students interested in pursuing the environmental sciences major in the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences should contact Kathryn Jones, kjones26@wisc.edu or 608-807-7391.

L&S undergraduate students interested in pursuing the environmental sciences major in the College of Letters & Science should contact Professor Jonathan Martin in the Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, jemarti1@wisc.edu or 608-262-9845.

Careers

A major in environmental sciences serves as excellent preparation for careers of great diversity, including environmental modeling, agricultural scientist, botanist, ecologist, forest ranger, oceanographer, agricultural technician, engineering technician, forester, air and water quality manager, environmental analyst, park ranger, air pollution analyst, environmental consultant, environmental educator, geologist, project manager, environmental engineer, geophysicist, biologist, hazardous waste manager, hydrologist, environmental lawyer, chemical technician, soil conservation technician, chemist, management consultant, teacher, meteorologist, urban and regional planner, civil engineer, environmental planner, microbiologist/wastewater plant operator, natural resource specialist, wildlife manager, conservationist, or zoologist. For more info about careers, please visit our website.

Executive Committee

Balster, Nick, Associate Professor, Department of Soil Science
Martin, Jonathan, Professor, Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences
Thompson, Anita, Professor, Department of Biological Systems Engineering

Program Committee

Bertram, Timothy, Associate Professor, Department of Chemistry
Grainger, Corbett, Assistant Professor Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics
Harrington, John, Professor, Department of Landscape Architecture
Holloway, Tracey, Professor, Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies
Hotchkiss, Sara, Professor, Department of Botany
Kanarek, Marty, Professor, Department of Population Health Sciences
Schauer, James, Professor, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering
Stoltenberg, David, Professor, Department of Agronomy