ls-genderwomenstudies

The gender and women’s studies major and certificate provide a unique background for students seeking to analyze gender and other vectors of inequality, both historically and in contemporary society, as reflected through texts, social practices, and social institutions in the U.S. and abroad. Our graduates have gone on to provide this kind of analysis in fields like health policy, immigration law, social work, reproductive justice, educational administration, employment policy, medicine, architectural design, and media production.

The curriculum reflects the interdisciplinary nature of gender and women's studies, offering to all students an opportunity to study gender and women in such areas as literature, history, anthropology, sociology, education, law, biology, psychology, philosophy, political science, economics, and the arts. Department courses have been designed to fulfill breadth requirements in the appropriate divisions.

The undergraduate major is a 30-credit program and the certificate is a 15-credit program. The interdisciplinary nature of gender and women's studies lends itself to working well with and complementing many other programs and plans across campus.  

Application

To become a gender and women’s studies major, students must first complete GEN&WS 101 Gender, Women, and Cultural Representation, GEN&WS 102 Gender, Women, and Society in Global Perspective, OR GEN&WS 103 Women and Their Bodies in Health and Disease with a grade of B or better. Then they must declare their intention to complete the gender and women's studies major with the undergraduate advisor.

University General Education Requirements

All undergraduate students at the University of Wisconsin–Madison are required to fulfill a minimum set of common university general education requirements to ensure that every graduate acquires the essential core of an undergraduate education. This core establishes a foundation for living a productive life, being a citizen of the world, appreciating aesthetic values, and engaging in lifelong learning in a continually changing world. Various schools and colleges will have requirements in addition to the requirements listed below. Consult your advisor for assistance, as needed. For additional information, see the university Undergraduate General Education Requirements section of the Guide.

General Education
  • Breadth—Humanities/Literature/Arts: 6 credits
  • Breadth—Natural Science: 4 to 6 credits, consisting of one 4- or 5-credit course with a laboratory component; or two courses providing a total of 6 credits
  • Breadth—Social Studies: 3 credits
  • Communication Part A & Part B *
  • Ethnic Studies *
  • Quantitative Reasoning Part A & Part B *

* The mortarboard symbol appears before the title of any course that fulfills one of the Communication Part A or Part B, Ethnic Studies, or Quantitative Reasoning Part A or Part B requirements.

College of Letters & Science Breadth and Degree Requirements: Bachelor of Arts (B.A.)

Students pursuing a bachelor of arts degree in the College of Letters & Science must complete all of the requirements below. The College of Letters & Science allows this major to be paired with either a bachelor of arts or a bachelor of science curriculum. View a comparison of the degree requirements here.

Bachelor of Arts degree requirements

Mathematics Fulfilled with completion of University General Education requirements Quantitative Reasoning a (QR A) and Quantitative Reasoning b (QR B) coursework. Please note that some majors may require students to complete additional math coursework beyond the B.A. mathematics requirement.
Foreign Language
  • Complete the fourth unit of a foreign language; OR
  • Complete the third unit of a foreign language and the second unit of an additional foreign language

Note: A unit is one year of high school work or one semester/term of college work.
L&S Breadth
  • Humanities, 12 credits: 6 of the 12 credits must be in literature
  • Social Sciences, 12 credits
  • Natural Sciences, 12 credits: must include one 3+ credit course in the biological sciences; must include one 3+ credit course in the physical sciences
Liberal Arts and Science Coursework 108 credits
Depth of Intermediate/Advanced work 60 intermediate or advanced credits
Major Declare and complete at least one (1) major
Total Credits 120 credits
UW-Madison Experience 30 credits in residence, overall
30 credits in residence after the 90th credit
Minimum GPAs 2.000 in all coursework at UW–Madison
2.000 in intermediate/advanced coursework at UW–Madison

Non–L&S students pursuing an L&S major

Non–L&S students who have permission from their school/college to pursue an additional major within L&S only need to fulfill the major requirements and do not need to complete the L&S breadth and degree requirements above.

Requirements for the Major

Majors in gender and women’s studies are required to take foundational work in gender and women's studies, courses reflecting each of four approaches to knowledge (humanities, social science, theory, and biological or health sciences), one course from three of four issue areas (sexuality, disability and embodiment, race/ethnicity, and global), and a capstone seminar or thesis.

All majors complete a minimum of 30 credits in GEN&WS including: 1

INTRODUCTORY GEN&WS

GEN&WS 101 Gender, Women, and Cultural Representation (only one of these courses may count toward the major)3
or GEN&WS 102 Gender, Women, and Society in Global Perspective
GEN&WS 103 Women and Their Bodies in Health and Disease3
Total Credits6

Approaches 2

1 course from each area:

Biology and Health

Explore health as both a physiological and a socio‐cultural experience, and recognize ways in which gender and other axes of social inequality influence health. Develop critical tools to place the medical field, scientific research, and public health and policy organizations into social contexts, and recognize how these institutions both can reflect and perpetuate dominant ideologies. Learn about feminist approaches to, and histories of, science, medicine, and health activism.

GEN&WS/​HIST SCI/​MED HIST  431 Childbirth in the United States3
GEN&WS/​HIST SCI/​MED HIST  524 The Medical History of Sex and Sexuality3
GEN&WS 530 Biology and Gender3
GEN&WS/​HIST SCI/​MED HIST  531 Women and Health in American History3
GEN&WS/​HIST SCI/​MED HIST  532 The History of the (American) Body3
GEN&WS 533 Special Topics in Women and Health3
GEN&WS 534 Gender, Sexuality, and Reproduction: Public Health Perspectives3
GEN&WS/​INTL ST  535 Women's Global Health and Human Rights3

Humanities

Engage with humanities-based theories, content areas, and methodologies as they relate to gender and women's studies. These include, but are not limited to, critical text analysis, discourse analysis, historical approaches and archival work, media studies, ethnography, and digital humanities. (GEN&WS courses with H, L or Z designations)

GEN&WS/​SOC  200 Introduction to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Queer+ Studies3-4
GEN&WS/​LITTRANS  205 Women in Russian Literature in Translation3-4
GEN&WS/​AFROAMER  221 Introduction to Black Women's Studies3
GEN&WS/​AFROAMER  222 Introduction to Black Women Writers3
GEN&WS/​ENGL  248 Women in Ethnic American Literature3
GEN&WS/​ENGL  250 Women in Literature3
GEN&WS/​LITTRANS  270 German Women Writers in Translation3
GEN&WS 310 Special Topics in Gender, Women and the Humanities1-3
GEN&WS/​HISTORY  315 Gender, Race and Colonialism3
GEN&WS 319 Study Abroad Special Topic: Gender, Women and the Humanities3-4
GEN&WS/​AFROAMER  324 Black Women in America: Reconstruction to the Present3
GEN&WS/​AFROAMER  326 Race and Gender in Post-World War II U.S. Society3
GEN&WS 330 Topics in Gender/Class/Race/Ethnicity (Humanities)3
GEN&WS/​CHICLA  332 Latinas: Self Identity and Social Change3
GEN&WS 340 Topics in LGBTQ Sexuality3
GEN&WS 342 Transgender Studies3-4
GEN&WS 343 Queer Bodies3
GEN&WS/​CLASSICS  351 Gender and Sexuality in the Classical World3-4
GEN&WS/​HISTORY  353 Women and Gender in the U.S. to 18703-4
GEN&WS/​AFROAMER  367 Art and Visual Culture: Women of the African Diaspora and Africa3
GEN&WS 370 Topics in Gender and Disability3
GEN&WS 371 Disability and Gender in Film3
GEN&WS 372 Visualizing Bodies3
GEN&WS 414 Gender, Performance, and Sexuality3
GEN&WS/​THEATRE  415 Introduction to Contemporary Feminist Theatre and Criticism3
GEN&WS/​COM ARTS  418 Gender, Sexuality, and the Media3
GEN&WS/​ENGL  419 Gender and Language3
GEN&WS/​AMER IND/​ANTHRO/​FOLKLORE  437 American Indian Women3
GEN&WS 441 Contemporary Feminist Theories3
GEN&WS 442 Lesbian Culture3
GEN&WS 445 The Body in Theory3
GEN&WS 449 Special Topics in Feminism and Social and Cultural Theory3
GEN&WS/​PORTUG  450 Brazillian Women Writers3
GEN&WS/​PORTUG  460 Carmen Miranda3
GEN&WS/​ASIAN AM/​ENGL  463 Race and Sexuality in American Literature3
GEN&WS/​ASIAN AM/​ENGL  464 Asian American Women Writers3
GEN&WS/​FOLKLORE  467 Women and Politics in Popular Culture and Folklore3
GEN&WS/​FOLKLORE  468 Feminism, Folklore and Comparative Literature3
GEN&WS/​HISTORY  519 Sexuality, Modernity and Social Change3
GEN&WS/​HIST SCI/​MED HIST  524 The Medical History of Sex and Sexuality3
GEN&WS/​HIST SCI/​MED HIST  532 The History of the (American) Body3
GEN&WS/​ENGL  545 Feminist Theory and Women's Writing in English3
GEN&WS 547 Theorizing Intersectionality3
GEN&WS/​AFROAMER  624 African American Women's Activism (19th & 20th Centuries)3
GEN&WS/​AFROAMER  625 Gender, Race and the Civil Rights Movement3
GEN&WS/​AFROAMER  677 Critical and Theoretical Perspectives in Black Women's Writings3
GEN&WS/​AFROAMER  679 Visual Culture, Gender and Critical Race Theory3

Social Science

Engage with social-science-based theories, content areas, and methodologies as they relate to gender and women's studies. These include, but are not limited to, scientific and clinical research, statistical analysis, mixed-methods approaches, and theories of social change. (GEN&WS courses with S or Z designations)

GEN&WS/​SOC  200 Introduction to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Queer+ Studies3-4
GEN&WS/​C&E SOC/​SOC  215 Gender and Work in Rural America3
GEN&WS 320 Special Topics in Gender, Women and Society1-3
GEN&WS/​AFROAMER  323 Gender, Race and Class: Women in U.S. History3
GEN&WS 329 Study Abroad Special Topic: Gender, Women in Society3-4
GEN&WS 331 Topics in Gender/Class/Race/Ethnicity (Social Sciences)3
GEN&WS/​AFROAMER  333 Black Feminisms3
GEN&WS 340 Topics in LGBTQ Sexuality3
GEN&WS/​HISTORY  353 Women and Gender in the U.S. to 18703-4
GEN&WS/​HISTORY  354 Women and Gender in the U.S. Since 18703-4
GEN&WS/​HISTORY  392 Women in History3-4
GEN&WS 420 Women in Cross-Societal Perspective3
GEN&WS/​LEGAL ST  422 Women and the Law3
GEN&WS 424 Women's International Human Rights3
GEN&WS/​CHICLA  425 Chicana and Latina Feminisms, Arts, and Media3
GEN&WS 426 Women and Grassroots Politics Across the Globe3
GEN&WS 427 Global Feminisms3
GEN&WS/​HIST SCI/​MED HIST  431 Childbirth in the United States3
GEN&WS 441 Contemporary Feminist Theories3
GEN&WS/​ANTHRO  443 Anthropology by Women3
GEN&WS 449 Special Topics in Feminism and Social and Cultural Theory3
GEN&WS/​POLI SCI  469 Women and Politics3-4
GEN&WS/​HISTORY/​LCA  472 Women in Turkish Society3
GEN&WS/​SOC  477 Feminism and Sociological Theory3
GEN&WS/​PSYCH  522 Psychology of Women and Gender3
GEN&WS/​ED POL  560 Gender and Education3
GEN&WS/​SOC  611 Gender, Science and Technology3

Feminist Theory

Explore feminist theoretical approaches, both national and international.

GEN&WS/​AFROAMER  333 Black Feminisms3
GEN&WS 441 Contemporary Feminist Theories3
GEN&WS 445 The Body in Theory3
GEN&WS 449 Special Topics in Feminism and Social and Cultural Theory3
GEN&WS/​SOC  477 Feminism and Sociological Theory3
GEN&WS 547 Theorizing Intersectionality3

Issue Areas 2

Race/Ethnicity

Explore the role of race/ethnicity as a tool of creating, identifying, materializing, and solidifying human difference. These courses may explore the construction and deployment of race/ethnicity anywhere in the world.

GEN&WS/​AFROAMER  221 Introduction to Black Women's Studies3
GEN&WS/​AFROAMER  222 Introduction to Black Women Writers3
GEN&WS/​ENGL  248 Women in Ethnic American Literature3
GEN&WS/​HISTORY  315 Gender, Race and Colonialism3
GEN&WS/​AFROAMER  323 Gender, Race and Class: Women in U.S. History3
GEN&WS/​AFROAMER  324 Black Women in America: Reconstruction to the Present3
GEN&WS/​AFROAMER  326 Race and Gender in Post-World War II U.S. Society3
GEN&WS 330 Topics in Gender/Class/Race/Ethnicity (Humanities)3
GEN&WS 331 Topics in Gender/Class/Race/Ethnicity (Social Sciences)3
GEN&WS/​CHICLA  332 Latinas: Self Identity and Social Change3
GEN&WS/​AFROAMER  333 Black Feminisms3
GEN&WS/​HISTORY  353 Women and Gender in the U.S. to 18703-4
GEN&WS/​HISTORY  354 Women and Gender in the U.S. Since 18703-4
GEN&WS/​AFROAMER  367 Art and Visual Culture: Women of the African Diaspora and Africa3
GEN&WS/​CHICLA  425 Chicana and Latina Feminisms, Arts, and Media3
GEN&WS/​AMER IND/​ANTHRO/​FOLKLORE  437 American Indian Women3
GEN&WS/​PORTUG  460 Carmen Miranda3
GEN&WS/​ASIAN AM/​ENGL  463 Race and Sexuality in American Literature3
GEN&WS/​ASIAN AM/​ENGL  464 Asian American Women Writers3
GEN&WS 547 Theorizing Intersectionality3
GEN&WS/​AFROAMER  624 African American Women's Activism (19th & 20th Centuries)3
GEN&WS/​AFROAMER  625 Gender, Race and the Civil Rights Movement3
GEN&WS/​AFROAMER  677 Critical and Theoretical Perspectives in Black Women's Writings3
GEN&WS/​AFROAMER  679 Visual Culture, Gender and Critical Race Theory3

Global

Explore aspects of gender in a comparative national frame. These classes may focus on the process of globalization or they may focus on gendered concerns in at least two national contexts.

GEN&WS/​HISTORY  315 Gender, Race and Colonialism3
GEN&WS/​AFROAMER  367 Art and Visual Culture: Women of the African Diaspora and Africa3
GEN&WS 414 Gender, Performance, and Sexuality3
GEN&WS 420 Women in Cross-Societal Perspective3
GEN&WS 424 Women's International Human Rights3
GEN&WS 426 Women and Grassroots Politics Across the Globe3
GEN&WS 427 Global Feminisms3
GEN&WS/​ANTHRO  443 Anthropology by Women3
GEN&WS/​FOLKLORE  467 Women and Politics in Popular Culture and Folklore3
GEN&WS/​FOLKLORE  468 Feminism, Folklore and Comparative Literature3
GEN&WS/​INTL ST  535 Women's Global Health and Human Rights3
GEN&WS/​URB R PL  644 International Development and Gender3
GEN&WS 661 Global Internship in Gender and Women's Studies1-6

Sexuality

Explore “sexuality” under the assumption that sexuality is not a natural or self-evident attribute or category, these courses demonstrate how sexuality has come to assume a variety of culturally specific but often contested meanings.

GEN&WS/​SOC  200 Introduction to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Queer+ Studies3-4
GEN&WS 340 Topics in LGBTQ Sexuality3
GEN&WS 342 Transgender Studies3-4
GEN&WS 343 Queer Bodies3
GEN&WS/​HISTORY  346 Trans/Gender in Historical Perspective3-4
GEN&WS/​CLASSICS  351 Gender and Sexuality in the Classical World3-4
GEN&WS 414 Gender, Performance, and Sexuality3
GEN&WS/​ENGL  419 Gender and Language3
GEN&WS/​ASIAN AM/​ENGL  463 Race and Sexuality in American Literature3
GEN&WS/​FOLKLORE  468 Feminism, Folklore and Comparative Literature3
GEN&WS/​HISTORY  519 Sexuality, Modernity and Social Change3
GEN&WS/​HIST SCI/​MED HIST  524 The Medical History of Sex and Sexuality3
GEN&WS/​HIST SCI/​MED HIST  532 The History of the (American) Body3
GEN&WS 534 Gender, Sexuality, and Reproduction: Public Health Perspectives3

Disability & Embodiment

Examine the creation and evolution of different categories of embodiment and the experience of living through and as bodies These courses focus on gender and disability, exploring disability as a social category, a medical realm, a political identity, an analytical approach, and a lived experience.

GEN&WS 343 Queer Bodies3
GEN&WS 370 Topics in Gender and Disability3
GEN&WS 371 Disability and Gender in Film3
GEN&WS 372 Visualizing Bodies3
GEN&WS 445 The Body in Theory3

Capstone

Capstone course or Thesis Sequence:3-6
Capstone Seminar in Gender and Women's Studies
Senior Honors Thesis I
and Senior Honors Thesis II
Senior Thesis I
and Senior Honors Thesis II
Total Credits3-6

RESIDENCE & QUALITY OF WORK

2.000 GPA in all GEN&WS and major courses

2.000 GPA on 15 upper-level major credits, taken rn Residence 1

15 credits in GEN&WS, taken on the UW–Madison campus

Notes

1

A maximum three courses designated as Elementary level may apply in the major, overall. Directed Study courses typically do not count toward the minimum credits required in the major.

2

A single course may apply to both Approach and Issues but a course may not apply to more than one Approach and it may not more than one Issue area.

3

Courses in GEN&WS and approved for the major that carry the Intermediate- or Advanced-level designation are considered upper level in the major. 

Research in the Major

Students interested in the doing research in Gender & Women's Studies are encouraged to  incorporate coursework outside of Gender and Women’s Studies and develop a thesis (GEN&WS 691-GEN&WS 692 or GEN&WS 681-GEN&WS 682) in consultation with a member of the faculty. The thesis sequence would serve as the Capstone requirement in the major.  In this case, the student may still take GEN&WS 640 Capstone Seminar in Gender and Women's Studies as an elective in the major.

Honors in the Major

To declare Honors in the Major in Gender and Women's Studies, students must submit a letter of application to the undergraduate advisor prior to enrollment in GEN&WS 681 Senior Honors Thesis I.  The letter should include:

  • A list of all planned and declared degrees, major and certificate programs 
  • Area(s) of research interest within gender and women's studies and ideas for an Senior Honors Thesis
  • A letter from a faculty member agreeing to supervise the thesis project

Honors in the Gender and Women's Studies Major Requirements

To earn a B.A. or B.S. with Honors in the Major in Gender and Women’s Studies, students must satisfy both the requirements for the major (above) and the following additional requirements:

  • Earn a 3.300 overall university GPA
  • Earn a 3.300 GPA for all GEN&WS courses, and all courses accepted in the major
  • Complete at least 2 courses, for a total of 6 or more credits, taken for Honors in GEN&WS
  • Complete a two-semester Senior Honors Thesis in GEN&WS 681 Senior Honors Thesis I and GEN&WS 682 Senior Honors Thesis II, for a total of 6 credits.

University Degree Requirements

Total Degree To receive a bachelor's degree from UW–Madison, students must earn a minimum of 120 degree credits. The requirements for some programs may exceed 120 degree credits. Students should consult with their college or department advisor for information on specific credit requirements.
Residency Degree candidates are required to earn a minimum of 30 credits in residence at UW–Madison. "In residence" means on the UW–Madison campus with an undergraduate degree classification. “In residence” credit also includes UW–Madison courses offered in distance or online formats and credits earned in UW–Madison Study Abroad/Study Away programs.
Quality of Work Undergraduate students must maintain the minimum grade point average specified by the school, college, or academic program to remain in good academic standing. Students whose academic performance drops below these minimum thresholds will be placed on academic probation.
  1. Gender ‐ Understand the concept of gender as an identity and an institution along its multiple dimensions (cultural, social, political, economic) and how gender in forms power relations.
  2. Intersectionality ‐ Recognize how gender intersects with other axes of inequality, such as race, class, disability status, sexuality, gender expression, nationality, geography and age. Identify the difference between intersectional and universalist understandings of gender.
  3. Feminist theory­ ‐ Apply feminist theoretical approaches, both national and international.
  4. Class­ ‐ Recognize the role of economic inequalities in creating material and cultural differences in the US and other national contexts and their gendered implications.
  5. Race/Ethnicity ‐ Understand the role of race/ethnicity as a tool of creating, identifying, materializing, and solidifying human difference and its relationship to gender.
  6. Global Processes ‐ Appreciate historical, political, cultural and socio‐economic influences on gender relations in global context. Understand global dimensions of gender inequality, including hierarchies among women within and across nations. Identify gendered dynamics of globalization in historical or contemporary contexts.
  7. Sexuality ­‐ Understand that sexuality is not a natural or self‐evident attribute or category and that sexuality assumes a variety of culturally specific and contested meanings.
  8. Disability and Embodiment ‐ Understand the creation and evolution of different categories of embodiment and the experience of living through and as bodies.
  9. Health and Science­ ‐ Identify that health is both a physiological and a socio‐cultural experience, and recognize ways in which gender and other axes of social inequality influence health. Develop critical tools to place the medical field, scientific research, and public health and policy organizations into social contexts, and recognize how these institutions both can reflect and perpetuate dominant ideologies. Learn about feminist approaches to, and histories of, science, medicine, and health activism.
  10. Contemporary and Historical Issues -­ Gain familiarity with a variety of issue areas in which gender is important, both historically and today, in national and transnational spheres. These include but are not limited to: health, the body, science, politics, citizenship, feminism, activism, labor, history, media, language, literature and the arts.
  11. Problem solving ‐ Identify important historical and contemporary issues relating to gender and women's studies, evaluate responses to them, and adapt the knowledge gained through this process to everyday situations.
  12. Research and inquiry ‐ Identify a problem related to gender and women’s studies. Produce or locate resources and learn to build a research agenda. Read broadly in order to develop well-focused projects, using primary and secondary sources. Delineate key points in scholarly articles and respond to them. Use different modes of research, including empirical methods, scholarly literature, and theoretical and artistic engagement. Develop advanced library skills tailored to specific research projects, including facility with electronic databases, bibliographic reference materials, archival documents, and image and sound repositories. Evaluate resources for their reliability.
  13. Interdisciplinarity ‐ Engage in interdisciplinary inquiry and research and understand the strengths and limits of interdisciplinarity.
  14. Critical thinking­ ‐ Be able to perform critical thinking along four dimensions: critical analysis, in which one can identify and evaluate arguments, rhetorical styles, synthesize ideas, and develop well‐substantiated, coherent, and concise arguments; logical reasoning, in which one can identify and follow a logical sequence or argument through to its end and recognize faulty reasoning or premature closure; abstract thinking, in which one can generalize for a specific purpose and/or in a way that clarifies and heightens understanding of major issues at stake, or identifies the essential or most relevant elements of a concept, event, object, text, etc; argumentation, in which one can marshal appropriate and relevant evidence in order to develop a clear claim or stance using specific rhetorical approaches.
  15. Writing ‐ Express ideas effectively in written form, develop sufficient evidence for arguments, and tailor arguments to audience and context.
  16. Oral Communication ‐ Express ideas effectively in verbal form, tailoring arguments and presentation styles to audience and context.
  17. Collaboration ­‐ Work collectively, take initiative, offer and receive constructive criticism, exchange ideas and creatively work together toward a common endeavor.
  18. Creativity ‐ Bring together a variety of texts, ideas, theoretical, political, empirical, aesthetic and rhetorical approaches in order to respond imaginatively to a social, political or intellectual issue.
  19. Career skills ­ - Create the building blocks for a career after graduation with all of the above skills.
  20. Critical self‐awareness -­ Demonstrate self‐reflexivity about one's ideas and social and political positions.
  21. Critical social awareness ­ ‐ Engage critically with social institutions that influence our personal and social lives, such as media, politics, the healthcare system, the economy and education.
  22. Ethics ­‐ Apply ethical frameworks, informed by the study of gender, feminism and social justice movements, to address unequal treatment or advantage in a variety of contexts.
  23. Engaged Practices ­‐ Link theory with practice. Recognize and advocate for social change at the local, national or transnational level.
  24. Advanced accomplishment ‐ Demonstrate synthesis of skills acquired and performed in advanced coursework.
  25. Application beyond the Gender and Women’s Studies classroom -­ Apply key Gender and Women’s Studies concepts to one’s life, activist projects, and to non‐Gender and Women’s Studies academic coursework.
     

Advising and Careers

Undergraduate Advising in Gender and Women's Studies and LGBT Studies

Connecting and working with your gender and women's studies undergraduate advisor as early as possible helps you create a meaningful course plan and stay on track as you complete your degree requirements.

Our undergraduate advisor is available to consult on a variety of topics including: program declaration, adding an additional major or certificate, course planning and four-year graduation plans, volunteer and internship opportunities, graduate school, and career development.

Internship Program in Gender and Women's Studies

Applied learning through internships within the field of gender and women's studies allows students the opportunity to connect the classroom to the community and put theory into practice. Recognizing the power and importance of experiential and service learning, we proudly offer both local and global internship opportunities in our department.

Our internship program is designed to provide students with opportunities for learning and working in organizations and settings that connect their coursework in gender and women's studies to specific issues in community settings. The connected internship seminar provides a venue for students to engage deeply in feminist-based work and reflection while thinking critically about participating as feminists in activism and professional settings.

Internship courses in GEN&WS:

GEN&WS 660 Internship in Gender and Women's Studies6
GEN&WS 661 Global Internship in Gender and Women's Studies1-6

Career Development in Gender and Women's Studies

The Department of Gender and Women's Studies is committed to helping our students understand and articulate how skills and concepts learned in the classroom can be applied in a professional setting. As reflected in our Learning Outcomes, students in gender and women's studies develop desirable professional skills, such as written and oral communication, critical thinking, problem solving, and collaboration skills, as well as critical self and social awareness.

The department continues to expand career development opportunities for our students by working with our alumni, and offering workshops, panels, and networking opportunities.

The L&S Career Services office

The L&S Career Services Office helps students leverage the academic skills learned in their major, certificates, and liberal arts degree, explore and try out different career paths, participate in internships, prepare for the job search and/or graduate school applications, and network with professionals in the field (alumni and employers).

The L&S Career Services Office can assist students in career advising, resume and cover letter writing, networking opportunities, interview skills, as well as course offerings for undergraduates to begin their career exploration early in their undergraduate career. 

Faculty

Professors: Finn Enke, Susan Friedman, Janet Hyde, Maria Lepowsky, Myra Marx Ferree, Aili Mari Tripp

Associate and Assistant Professors: Christine Garlough, Jenny Higgins, Judith Houck, Pernille Ipsen, Ellen Samuels, Keisha Lindsay

Faculty Affiliates: See the GWS Faculty Affiliates for more information about instructors on campus who are engaged in feminist-inspired teaching and research.

Lecturers and TEACHING ASSISTANTS

See the current semester's directory of GWS lecturers and teaching assistants.

UNDERgraduate Student SErvices

Academic Advising: Susan Nelson

Enrollment Inquiries: Diane Walton

Curricular Planning: Nina Valeo Cooke