comparative-literature-folklore-studies

Admissions to the Comparative Literature and Folklore Studies M.A. have been suspended as of summer 2018 and will be discontinued as of fall 2021. If you have any questions, please contact the department.

Graduate study in the Department of Comparative Literature and Folklore Studies (CLFS) emphasizes the active research into and theorizing of the comparative, the literary, the folkloric, and the cultural in a global context. CLFS faculty and students investigate cultures within, across, and beyond linguistic, regional, and national boundaries. The comparative and pluri-lingual nature of CLFS at UW–Madison enables the careful and informed study of new and evolving theories and cultural methodologies as well as of prior, present, and emerging cultural and literary practices and phenomena.

CLFS students study problems and create public projects exploring culture, genre, literary and cultural movements, mode, performance, periodization, theory and criticism, tradition, translation, and transmission. They engage problems and questions concerning the interaction and shifting boundaries of 'elite' and 'folk' literatures and other forms of creative expression and their transformation in their interaction; folklore and literature with other arts or other disciplines; and the relationships between creative expression and economic, sociopolitical, traditional, and other historical structures and issues, including ideological and value formations.
In addition to professional research and communication in the academic fields of comparative literature and folklore studies, CLFS is committed to public humanities projects that place professional expertise in the service of communities and publics.

Graduate study leads to the M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in CLFS and must be in either a comparative literature named option or a folklore studies named option.

The department also offers doctoral minors in comparative literature and in folklore to interested Ph.D. candidates in other degree programs. At the beginning of study in the minor program, all students seeking a comparative literature or folklore doctoral minor should contact the CLFS director of graduate studies concerning coursework for the minor. Completion of the minor will be certified by either the director of graduate studies or the department chair.

Admissions to the Comparative Literature and Folklore Studies M.A. have been suspended as of summer 2018 and will be discontinued as of fall 2021. If you have any questions, please contact the department.

Students apply to one of the named options:

All entering students are admitted into one of the two named options in the M.A. program. Students are accepted into the Ph.D. program upon successful completion of the Second-Year Examination.

Graduate School Resources

Resources to help you afford graduate study might include assistantships, fellowships, traineeships, and financial aid. Further funding information is available from the Graduate School. Be sure to check with your program for individual policies and restrictions related to funding.

Minimum Graduate School Requirements

Review the Graduate School minimum academic progress and degree requirements, in addition to the program requirements listed below.

Major Requirements

CURRICULAR REQUIREMENTS

Minimum Credit Requirement 30 credits
Minimum Residence Credit Requirement 16 credits
Minimum Graduate Coursework Requirement Successful completion of the master’s degree requires 30 credit hours of coursework. This requirement includes that at least 50 percent of these credit hours must be received in graduate-level coursework; courses with the Graduate Level Coursework attribute are identified and searchable in the university's Course Guide.
Overall Graduate GPA Requirement 3.5 GPA required.
Other Grade Requirements None.
Assessments and Examinations See Named Options for policy information.
Language Requirements Second Language: An examination in a second language (other than English) must be taken by the end of the second semester of graduate study and before the Second Year Examination.

In the event that the linguistic tradition under examination cannot be covered by a member of the comparative literature and folklore studies faculty, the advisor will invite an appropriate member of the UW–Madison faculty to assist in the administration of the examination.

Required Courses

Select a Named Option for courses required.

Named Options

A named option is a formally documented sub-major within an academic major program. Named options appear on the transcript with degree conferral. Students pursuing the Master of Arts in Comparative Literature and Folklore Studies must select one of the following named options:

Students should refer to one of the named options for policy information:

Graduate School Resources

Take advantage of the Graduate School's professional development resources to build skills, thrive academically, and launch your career. 

  1. Articulates, critiques, or elaborates the theories, research methods, and approaches to inquiry and schools of practice in comparative humanities.
  2. Identifies sources and assembles evidence pertaining to questions or challenges in comparative humanities.
  3. Demonstrates understanding of comparative humanities in a historical, social, or global context.
  4. Selects and/or utilizes the most appropriate methodologies and practices.
  5. Evaluates or synthesizes information to questions or challenges in comparative humanities.
  6. Communicates clearly in ways appropriate to comparative humanities.
  7. Recognizes and applies principles of ethical and professional conduct.

Faculty: Professor Livorni (chair, also French and Italian); Associate Professor Livanos; Assistant Professor Fielder; Lecturer Botero. Affiliate Faculty: Professors Adler (German, Nordic, and Slavic), Casid (Art History),  Dharwadker (English), Garlough (Gender and Women's Studies), Gilmore (Landscape Architecture), Goodkin (French and Italian), Guyer (English), Kern (Asian Languages and Cultures), Longinovic (German, Nordic, and Slavic), Rosenblum (Jewish Studies), Valentine (Linguistics) Wells (English); Associate Professors Kapust (Political Science), Neyrat (English);  Assistant Professor Grunewald (English), International Affiliate Faculty: Ramalho de Sousa Santos (University of Coimbra, Portugal). See also Faculty on the department website.