grad-biomedicaldata-ms
Fall Deadline January 12
Spring Deadline The program does not admit in the spring.
Summer Deadline The program does not admit in the summer.
GRE (Graduate Record Examinations) Required.
English Proficiency Test Every applicant whose native language is not English or whose undergraduate instruction was not in English must provide an English proficiency test score and meet the Graduate School minimum requirements (https://grad.wisc.edu/apply/requirements/#english-proficiency).
Other Test(s) (e.g., GMAT, MCAT) The MCAT may be accepted as an alternate to the GRE.
Letters of Recommendation Required 3

Potential students include both those with bachelor’s degrees in an area of data-science (e.g., computer science, statistics), as well as health professionals and clinicians (e.g., M.D.'s, Pharm.D.'s, R.N.'s). It is expected that admitted candidates will have demonstrated an aptitude for computer science and math, fundamental programming skills, knowledge of data structures and algorithms, and at least two semesters of college calculus. We will however consider candidates who have a wide range of undergraduate backgrounds; providing opportunities to develop necessary skills immediately upon entering the program.

Applying to the Program:

  • A formal online application with required fee through the UW–Madison Graduate School
  • Three letters of recommendation
  • Transcripts from each higher-education institution attended
  • A statement of purpose
  • GRE or MCAT scores
  • Applicants whose native language is not English, or whose undergraduate instruction was not in English, must provide an English proficiency test score (TOEFL, MELAB, or IELTS)
  • Evidence of quantitative preparation, including at least two semesters of college calculus (similar to MATH 221MATH 222 ) and either a course in linear algebra (similar to MATH 340 ) or courses in programming and data structures

Application Deadline:  January 12

For additional information about admission to the program, see MS Program in Biomedical Data Science on the department website.

Graduate School Resources

Resources to help you afford graduate study might include assistantships, fellowships, traineeships, and financial aid. Further funding information is available from the Graduate School. Be sure to check with your program for individual policies and restrictions related to funding.

Program Resources

Funding guarantees are not provided for students in this program. Students are encouraged to explore funding options available across campus.

Minimum Graduate School Requirements

Review the Graduate School minimum academic progress and degree requirements, in addition to the program requirements listed below.

Major Requirements

MODE OF INSTRUCTION

Face to Face Evening/Weekend Online Hybrid Accelerated
Yes No No No No

Mode of Instruction Definitions

CURRICULAR REQUIREMENTS

Minimum Credit Requirement 31 credits
Minimum Residence Credit Requirement 16 credits
Minimum Graduate Coursework Requirement Half of the coursework (16 out of 31 total credits) must be completed in graduate-level coursework; courses with the Graduate Level Coursework attribute are identified and searchable in the university's Course Guide.
Overall Graduate GPA Requirement 3.00 GPA required.
Other Grade Requirements Students must earn a B or above in all core curriculum coursework.
Assessments and Examinations No formal examination required.
Language Requirements No language requirements.

Required Courses

Concentration Electives 112
In consultation with their faculty advisor, students will select electives in an area of concentration within biomedical data science. Examples include but are not limited to:
Decision Making in Health Care 2
Introduction to Biostatistics
Introduction to Biostatistics for Population Health
Statistical Methods for Bioscience I
Regression Methods for Population Health
Medical Image Analysis
Statistical Methods for Bioscience II
Foundations of Data-Driven Healthcare
Introduction to Bioinformatics
Mathematical Methods for Systems Biology
Health Information Systems
Statistical Methods for Clinical Trials
Statistical Methods for Epidemiology
Advanced Regression Methods for Population Health
Survival Analysis Theory and Methods
Computational Methods for Medical Image Analysis
Statistical Methods for Medical Image Analysis
Clinical Research Informatics
Advanced Bioinformatics
Special Topics in Biostatistics and Biomedical Informatics (Topic: Computational Network Biology)
Statistical Methods for Molecular Biology
Data Science Electives 112
In consultation with their faculty advisor, students will select two courses as electives in computer science and/or statistics. Coursework of high relevance includes the following areas:
Mathematical Statistics I
Introduction to Statistical Inference
Professional Skills in Data Science
Statistical Computing
Theory and Application of Regression and Analysis of Variance I
Theory and Application of Regression and Analysis of Variance II
Introduction to Algorithms
Advanced Algorithms
Computer Vision
Database Management Systems: Design and Implementation
Topics in Database Management Systems
Introduction to Human-Computer Interaction
Human-Computer Interaction
Introduction to Artificial Intelligence
Machine Learning
Mathematical Foundations of Machine Learning
Natural Language and Computing
Advanced Natural Language Processing
Introduction to Combinatorial Optimization
Linear Optimization
Tools and Environments for Optimization
Introduction to Information Security
Research Ethics Course1-2
Special Topics in Biostatistics and Biomedical Informatics (Topic: Ethics for Data Scientists)
B M I 826 is recommended. If a student is unable to take B M I 826, one of the following courses may be substituted.
Ethics in Science
Advanced Topics (Topic: Responsible Conduct of Research)
Ethics and the Responsible Conduct of Research
Research Ethics and Career Development
Responsible Conduct of Research for Biomedical Graduate Students
Advanced Responsible Conduct of Research for Biomedical Students
Research 33-6
Independent Study
Electives0-3
Additional elective credits are not required if student completes two semesters (6 credits) of research.
Total Credits31

Graduate School Policies

The Graduate School’s Academic Policies and Procedures provide essential information regarding general university policies. Program authority to set degree policies beyond the minimum required by the Graduate School lies with the degree program faculty. Policies set by the academic degree program can be found below.

Major-Specific Policies

Prior Coursework

Graduate Work from Other Institutions

With program approval, students are allowed to count no more than 9 credits of graduate coursework from other institutions. Coursework earned five or more years prior to admission to a master's degree is not allowed to satisfy requirements.

UW–Madison Undergraduate

With program approval, students are allowed up to 7 credits numbered 300 or above from a UW–Madison undergraduate degree to count toward the degree. Coursework earned five or more years prior to admission to a master's degree is not allowed to satisfy requirements.

UW–Madison University Special

With program approval, students are allowed to count no more than 9 credits of course work numbered 300 or above taken as a UW–Madison Special student. Coursework earned five or more years prior to admission to a master's degree is not allowed to satisfy requirements.

Probation

The status of a student can be one of three options:

  1. Good standing (progressing according to standards; any funding guarantee remains in place).
  2. Probation (not progressing according to standards but permitted to enroll; loss of funding guarantee; specific plan with dates and deadlines in place in regard to removal of probationary status).
  3. Unsatisfactory progress (not progressing according to standards; not permitted to enroll, dismissal, leave of absence or change of advisor or program).

ADVISOR / COMMITTEE

All students are required to conduct a yearly progress report meeting with their advisor, scheduled by December 17 and completed by April 30.

CREDITS PER TERM ALLOWED

15 credits

Time Constraints

Master's degree students who have been absent for five or more consecutive years lose all credits that they have earned before their absence. Individual programs may count the coursework students completed prior to their absence for meeting program requirements; that coursework may not count toward Graduate School credit requirements.

grievances and appeals

These resources may be helpful in addressing your concerns:

Grievance Policy for Graduate Programs in the School of Medicine and Public Health

Any student in a School of Medicine and Public Health graduate program who feels that they have been treated unfairly in regards to educational decisions and/or outcomes or issues specific to the graduate program, including academic standing, progress to degree, professional activities, appropriate advising, and a program’s community standards by a faculty member, staff member, postdoc, or student has the right to complain about the treatment and to receive a prompt hearing of the grievance following these grievance procedures. Any student who discusses, inquiries about, or participates in the grievance procedure may do so openly and shall not be subject to intimidation, discipline, or retaliation because of such activity. Each program’s grievance advisor is listed on the “Research” tab of the SMPH intranet.

Exclusions

This policy does not apply to employment-related issues for Graduate Assistants in TA, PA and/or RA appointments.  Graduate Assistants will utilize the Graduate Assistantship Policies and Procedures (GAPP) grievance process to resolve employment-related issues.

This policy does not apply to instances when a graduate student wishes to report research misconduct.  For such reports refer to the UW-Madison Policy for Reporting Research Misconduct for Graduate Students and Postdoctoral Research Associates.

Requirements for Programs

The School of Medicine and Public Health Office of Basic Research, Biotechnology and Graduate Studies requires that each graduate program designate a grievance advisor, who should be a tenured faculty member, and will request the name of the grievance advisor annually.  The program director will serve as the alternate grievance advisor in the event that the grievance advisor is named in the grievance.  The program must notify students of the grievance advisor, including posting the grievance advisor’s name on the program’s Guide page and handbook.

The grievance advisor or program director may be approached for possible grievances of all types.  They will spearhead the grievance response process described below for issues specific to the graduate program, including but not limited to academic standing, progress to degree, professional activities, appropriate advising, and a program’s community standards.  They will ensure students are advised on reporting procedures for other types of possible grievances and are supported throughout the reporting process.  Resources on identifying and reporting other issues have been compiled by the Graduate School.

Procedures

  1. The student is advised to initiate a written record containing dates, times, persons, and description of activities, and to update this record while completing the procedures described below.
  2. If the student is comfortable doing so, efforts should be made to resolve complaints informally between individuals before pursuing a formal grievance.
  3. Should a satisfactory resolution not be achieved, the student should contact the program’s grievance advisor or program director to discuss the complaint. The student may approach the grievance advisor or program director alone or with a UW-Madison faculty or staff member. The grievance advisor or program director should keep a record of contacts with regards to possible grievances.  The first attempt is to help the student informally address the complaint prior to pursuing a formal grievance. The student is also encouraged to talk with their faculty advisor regarding concerns or difficulties.
  4. If the issue is not resolved to the student’s satisfaction, the student may submit a formal grievance to the grievance advisor or program director in writing, within 60 calendar days from the date the grievant first became aware of, or should have become aware of with the exercise of reasonable diligence, the cause of the grievance.  To the fullest extent possible, a grievance shall contain a clear and concise statement of the grievance and indicate the issue(s) involved, the relief sought, the date(s) the incident or violation took place, and any specific policy involved.
  5. On receipt of a written grievance, the following steps will occur.  The final step must be completed within 30 business days from the date the grievance was received.  The program must store documentation of the grievance for seven years. Significant grievances that set a precedent may be stored indefinitely.
    1. The grievance advisor or program director will convene a faculty committee composed of at least three members to manage the grievance.  Any faculty member involved in the grievance or who feels that they cannot be impartial may not participate in the committee.  Committee composition should reflect diverse viewpoints within the program.
    2. The faculty committee, through the grievance advisor or program director, will obtain a written response from the person or persons toward whom the grievance is directed. The grievance advisor or program director will inform this person that their response will be shared with the student filing the grievance.
    3. The grievance advisor or program director will share the response with the student filing the grievance.
    4. The faculty committee will make a decision regarding the grievance. The committee’s review shall be fair, impartial, and timely.  The grievance advisor or program director will report on the action taken by the committee in writing to both the student and the person toward whom the grievance was directed.
  6. If either party (the student or the person or persons toward whom the grievance is directed) is unsatisfied with the decision of the program’s faculty committee, the party may file a written appeal to the SMPH senior associate dean for basic research, biotechnology and graduate studies within 10 business days from the date of notification of the program’s faculty committee.  The following steps will occur:
    1. The grievant will be notified in writing, within 5 business days of the written appeal, acknowledging receipt of the formal appeal and establishing a timeline for the review to be completed.
    2. The senior associate dean or their designee may request additional materials and/or arrange meetings with the grievant and/or others.  If meetings occur, the senior associate dean or their designee will meet with both the grievant and the person or persons toward whom the grievance is directed.
    3. The senior associate dean or their designee will assemble an ad hoc committee of faculty from outside of the student’s graduate program and ask them to prepare a written recommendation on whether to uphold or reverse the decision of the program on the student’s initial grievance.  The committee may request additional materials and/or arrange meetings with the grievant and/or others.  If meetings occur, the committee will meet with both the grievant and the person or persons toward whom the grievance is directed.
    4. The senior associate dean or their designee will make a final decision within 20 business days of receipt of the committee’s recommendation.
    5. The SMPH Office of Basic Research, Biotechnology, and Graduate Studies must store documentation of the grievance for seven years. Grievances that set a precedent may be stored indefinitely.
  7. The student may file an appeal of the School of Medicine and Public Health decision with the Graduate School.  See the Grievances and Appeals section of the Graduate School’s Academic Policies and Procedures.

Time Limits

Steps in the grievance procedures must be initiated and completed within the designated time periods except when modified by mutual consent. If the student fails to initiate the next step in the grievance procedure within the designated time period, the grievance will be considered resolved by the decision at the last completed step.

Other

Funding guarantees are not provided for students in this program. Students are encouraged to explore funding options available across campus.

Graduate School Resources

Take advantage of the Graduate School's professional development resources to build skills, thrive academically, and launch your career. 

  1. Understand, apply, and evaluate common informatics theories, methods, and tools related to biological and biomedical problems, health care and public health.
  2. Apply, adapt, and validate an existing approach to a specific biomedical and health problem.
  3. Produce solutions that address academic or industrial needs using informatics tools and knowledge.
  4. Evaluate the impact of biomedical informatics applications and interventions.
  5. Understand the challenges and limitations of technological solutions.
  6. Demonstrate scholarly oral and written presentations.
  7. Adhere to the professional and legal standards of conduct in Biomedical Data Science.

Faculty: Broman, Buchanan, Burnside, Chappell, Chen, Chung, Craven, Dewey, Doan, Dyer, Elwert, Gangnon, Gianola, Gitter, Keles, Kendziorski, Kim, Lu, Mao, Mumford, Newton (chair), Ong,  Palta, Patel, Peissig, Rosa, Rosenberg, Roy, Singh, Sorkness, Tang, Yandell, Velten, Wang, Yu, Zhang, Zhu