CoE_nuclear-engr-bs

The Department of Engineering Physics offers the B.S. degree in nuclear engineering and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in nuclear engineering and engineering physics.

Nuclear engineering is defined as the application of nuclear and radiation processes in technology. An important application is the generation of electricity using nuclear reactors. Another important application is in medicine, where radiation and radioisotopes are used to diagnose and treat illness. Nuclear engineering offers students an important opportunity to help meet the energy needs of our society and to contribute to the improvement of health through medical applications. Further, because the nuclear engineering curriculum is very rich in engineering physics, graduates are prepared to work in a number of technical activities outside the nuclear engineering field.

Nuclear energy, both from fission and fusion, offers a promising approach to meeting the nation's energy needs--an approach that may preserve jobs, raise the standard of living of Americans, and alleviate the depletion of natural resources including natural gas, petroleum, and coal. Even more important, nuclear energy offers the only practical, environmentally benign approach to generating electricity on a large scale because it releases no harmful SO2, NOX, CO2, or particulate matter into the atmosphere. Nuclear energy has played, and continues to play, an important role in space exploration. Nuclear engineering has enabled the use of isotopic power supplies in deep space probes like the Cassini mission, and may eventually be used to design fission or fusion-based systems for more demanding missions

Since the discovery of fission many years ago, electricity is being produced commercially in a several hundred billion-dollar industry. Applications of radioactive tracers have been made in medicine, science, and industry. Radiation from particle accelerators and materials made radioactive in nuclear reactors are used worldwide to treat cancer and other diseases, to provide power for satellite instrumentation, to preserve food, to sterilize medical supplies, to search for faults in welds and piping, and to polymerize chemicals. Low energy plasmas are used in the manufacture of microelectronics components and to improve the surface characteristics of materials. High energy plasmas offer the possibility of a new energy source using thermonuclear fusion.

Because the breadth and rate of change in this field requires that the nuclear engineer have a broad educational background, the curriculum consists of physics, math, materials science, electronics, thermodynamics, heat transfer, computers, courses in the humanities and social science areas, and numerous elective courses. Courses of a specific nuclear engineering content come primarily in the third and fourth years.

The curriculum prepares students for careers in the nuclear industry and government—with electric utility companies, in regulatory positions with the federal or state governments, or for major contractors on the design and testing of improved reactors for central station power generation or for propulsion of naval vessels.

The curriculum also prepares the graduate for work in many areas where a broad technical background is more important than specialization in a specific field. Thus, the graduate is also prepared to work in any area where a broad engineering background is helpful, such as management, technical sales, or law. The curriculum gives students excellent preparation for graduate study in the fission and fusion areas, medical and health physics, applied superconductivity, particle accelerator technology, and other areas of engineering science in addition to study in areas such as materials science, physics, mathematics, and medicine.

Objectives of the Nuclear Engineering Program

  • educate students in the fundamental subjects necessary for a career in nuclear engineering, and prepare students for advanced education in it and related fields;
  • educate students in the basics of instrumentation, design of laboratory techniques, measurement, and data acquisition, interpretation and analysis;
  • educate students in the methodology of design;
  • provide and facilitate teamwork and multidisciplinary experiences throughout the curriculum;
  • foster the development of effective oral and written communication skills;
  • expose students to environmental, ethical and contemporary issues.

Admission to the College as a Freshman

Students applying to UW–Madison need to indicate an engineering major as their first choice in order to be considered for direct admission to the College of Engineering. Direct admission to a major means students will start in the program of their choice in the College of Engineering and will need to meet progression requirements at the end of the first year to guarantee advancement in that program.

Cross-Campus Transfer to Engineering

UW–Madison students in other schools and colleges on campus must meet the course and credit requirements for admission to engineering degree granting classifications specified in the general college requirements. The requirements are the minimum for admission consideration. Cross-campus admission is competitive and selective, and the grade point average expectations may increase as demand trends change. The student’s overall academic record at UW–Madison is also considered. Students apply to their intended engineering program by submitting the online application by stated deadlines for spring and fall. The College of Engineering offers group information sessions for students to learn about the cross-campus transfer process.

Off-Campus Transfer to Engineering

With careful planning, students at other accredited institutions can transfer coursework that will apply toward engineering degree requirements at UW–Madison. Off-campus transfer applicants are considered for direct admission to the College of Engineering by applying to the Office of Admissions with an engineering major listed as their first choice. Those who are admitted to their intended engineering program must meet progression requirements at the point of transfer or within their first two semesters at UW–Madison to guarantee advancement in that program. A minimum of 30 credits in residence in the College of Engineering is required after transferring, and all students must meet all requirements for their major in the college. Transfer admission to the College of Engineering is competitive and selective, and students who have earned more than 80 transferable semester credits at the time of application are not eligible to apply.

Off-campus transfer students are encouraged to discuss their interests, academic background, and admission options with the Transfer Admissions and Advising Coordinator in the College of Engineering: ugtransfer@engr.wisc.edu or 608-262-2473.

Second Bachelor's Degree

The College of Engineering does not accept second undergraduate degree applications. Second degree students might explore the Biological Systems Engineering program at UW–Madison, an undergraduate engineering degree elsewhere, or a graduate program in the College of Engineering.

University General Education Requirements

All undergraduate students at the University of Wisconsin–Madison are required to fulfill a minimum set of common university general education requirements to ensure that every graduate acquires the essential core of an undergraduate education. This core establishes a foundation for living a productive life, being a citizen of the world, appreciating aesthetic values, and engaging in lifelong learning in a continually changing world. Various schools and colleges will have requirements in addition to the requirements listed below. Consult your advisor for assistance, as needed. For additional information, see the university Undergraduate General Education Requirements section of the Guide.

General Education
  • Breadth—Humanities/Literature/Arts: 6 credits
  • Breadth—Natural Science: 4 to 6 credits, consisting of one 4- or 5-credit course with a laboratory component; or two courses providing a total of 6 credits
  • Breadth—Social Studies: 3 credits
  • Communication Part A & Part B *
  • Ethnic Studies *
  • Quantitative Reasoning Part A & Part B *

* The mortarboard symbol appears before the title of any course that fulfills one of the Communication Part A or Part B, Ethnic Studies, or Quantitative Reasoning Part A or Part B requirements.

Nuclear Engineering Curriculum

The nuclear engineering curriculum is divided into two options, one emphasizing nuclear power and one emphasizing medical and other nonpower applications of radiation sciences. The power option is more appropriate for students seeking careers in the nuclear power industry, while the radiation sciences option is better suited for students interested in medical and non-power applications.

Power Option Curriculum

The following curriculum applies to students who entered the program after fall 2014.

Summary of Requirements

Mathematics and Statistics22
Science13
Engineering Science31
Nuclear Engineering Core24
Nuclear Engineering Electives12
Introduction to Engineering3
Communication Skills8
Liberal Studies16
Total Credits129

Mathematics and Statistics

MATH 221 Calculus and Analytic Geometry 15
or MATH 217 Calculus with Algebra and Trigonometry II
or MATH 275 Topics in Calculus I
MATH 222 Calculus and Analytic Geometry 24
or MATH 276 Topics in Calculus II
MATH 234 Calculus--Functions of Several Variables4
MATH 320 Linear Algebra and Differential Equations3
MATH 321 Applied Mathematical Analysis3
STAT 224 Introductory Statistics for Engineers3
or STAT 324 Introductory Applied Statistics for Engineers
Total Credits22

 Science

CHEM 109 Advanced General Chemistry (or CHEM 103 & 104)5
PHYSICS 202 General Physics5
or PHYSICS 208 General Physics
PHYSICS 241 Introduction to Modern Physics3
or PHYSICS 205 Modern Physics for Engineers
Total Credits13

Engineering Science

E M A 201 Statics3
E M A 202 Dynamics3
or M E 240 Dynamics
E M A 303 Mechanics of Materials3
or M E 306 Mechanics of Materials
E M A/​M E  307 Mechanics of Materials Lab1
or M E/​E M A  307 Mechanics of Materials Lab
E P 271 Engineering Problem Solving I3
or COMP SCI 310 Problem Solving Using Computers
M S & E 350 Introduction to Materials Science3
M E 231 Introductory Engineering Graphics2
M E 361 Thermodynamics (or M E 363 and M E 364)3
or PHYSICS 322 Electromagnetic Fields
CBE/​B M E  320 Introductory Transport Phenomena4
E C E 376 Electrical and Electronic Circuits3
or PHYSICS 321 Electric Circuits and Electronics
Computing Elective3
Total Credits31

Nuclear Engineering Core

N E 305 Fundamentals of Nuclear Engineering3
N E 405 Nuclear Reactor Theory3
N E 408 Ionizing Radiation3
N E 411 Nuclear Reactor Engineering3
N E 412 Nuclear Reactor Design5
N E 427 Nuclear Instrumentation Laboratory2
N E 428 Nuclear Reactor Laboratory2
N E 571 Economic and Environmental Aspects of Nuclear Energy3
Total Credits24

Nuclear Engineering Electives

Technical Electives3
Technical Electives (not to be confused with Nuclear Engineering Electives or Medical Physics Electives) must be chosen from courses offered by the College of Engineering or by the departments of Physics, Mathematics, Computer Sciences, or Chemistry.
Nuclear Engineering Electives9
Select credits in the power track
Total Credits12

Nuclear Engineering Electives Course List 1

N E 234 Principles and Practice of Nuclear Reactor Operations4
N E 406 Nuclear Reactor Analysis3
N E/​M S & E  423 Nuclear Engineering Materials3
N E 424 Nuclear Materials Laboratory1
N E/​CIV ENGR/​I SY E  460 Uncertainty Analysis for Engineers3
N E/​MED PHYS  506 Monte Carlo Radiation Transport3
M E/​N E  520 Two-Phase Flow and Heat Transfer3
N E/​E C E/​PHYSICS  525 Introduction to Plasmas3
N E 536 Feasibility St of Power from Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion3
N E 541 Radiation Damage in Metals3
N E 550 Advanced Nuclear Power Engineering3
N E 555 Nuclear Reactor Dynamics3
N E/​M E  565 Power Plant Technology3
N E/​MED PHYS  569 Health Physics and Biological Effects3-4
N E/​I SY E  574 Methods for Probabilistic Risk Analysis of Nuclear Power Plants3

Students are encouraged to access the online NE future course offering grid to plan their future course schedules and to confirm the offering of a course in the table.

1

Courses meeting the Nuclear Engineering Electives requirement are all NE courses numbered above 200 that are not part of the required curriculum. No more than 3 credits of  N E 699 Advanced Independent Study, may be used to meet this requirement. (Refer to page 9 in NE Curriculum Handbook).

Introduction to Engineering

INTEREGR 110 Introduction to Engineering1
INTEREGR 170 Design Practicum2
Total Credits3

Communication Skills

ENGL 100 Introduction to College Composition3
or LSC 100 Science and Storytelling
or COM ARTS 100 Introduction to Speech Composition
or ESL 118 Academic Writing II
E P D 275 Technical Presentations2
E P D 397 Technical Communication3
Total Credits8

Liberal Studies Electives

College of Engineering Liberal Studies Requirements
Complete Requirements 116
Total Credits16
1

Students must take 16 credits that carry H, S, L, or Z breadth designators. These credits must fulfill the following subrequirements:

  1. A minimum of two courses from the same department or program. At least one of these two courses must be designated as above the elementary level (I, A, or D) in the course listing.
  2. A minimum of 6 credits designated as humanities (H, L, or Z in the course listing), and an additional minimum of 3 credits designated as social science (S or Z in the course listing). Foreign language courses count as H credits. Retroactive credits for language courses may not be used to meet the Liberal Studies credit requirement (they can be used for subrequirement 1 above).
  3. At least 3 credits in courses designated as ethnic studies (lower case “e” in the course listing). These courses may help satisfy subrequirements 1 and 2 above, but they only count once toward the total required. Note: Some courses may have “e” designation but not have H, S, L, or Z designation; these courses do not count toward the Liberal Studies requirement.

For information on credit load, adding or dropping courses, course substitutions, pass/fail, auditing courses, dean's honor list, repeating courses, probation, and graduation, see the College of Engineering Official Regulations.


Radiation Sciences Option Curriculum

The following curriculum applies to students who entered the program after fall 2014. Students selecting the radiation sciences option must submit an option declaration form to the department office.

Summary of Requirements

Mathematics and Statistics22
Science16
Engineering Science27
Nuclear Engineering Core Requirement24
Medical Physics Electives9
Introduction to Engineering3
Communication Skills8
Liberal Studies16
Technical Elective3
Free Elective1
Total Credits129

Mathematics and Statistics

MATH 221 Calculus and Analytic Geometry 15
or MATH 217 Calculus with Algebra and Trigonometry II
or MATH 275 Topics in Calculus I
MATH 222 Calculus and Analytic Geometry 24
or MATH 276 Topics in Calculus II
MATH 234 Calculus--Functions of Several Variables4
MATH 320 Linear Algebra and Differential Equations3
MATH 321 Applied Mathematical Analysis3
STAT 224 Introductory Statistics for Engineers3
or STAT 324 Introductory Applied Statistics for Engineers
Total Credits22

Science 

CHEM 109 Advanced General Chemistry ((or CHEM 103 & 104))5
PHYSICS 202 General Physics5
or PHYSICS 208 General Physics
PHYSICS 241 Introduction to Modern Physics3
or PHYSICS 205 Modern Physics for Engineers
PHYSICS 322 Electromagnetic Fields3
Total Credits16

Engineering Science 

E M A 201 Statics3
E M A 202 Dynamics3
or M E 240 Dynamics
E M A 303 Mechanics of Materials3
or M E 306 Mechanics of Materials
E M A/​M E  307 Mechanics of Materials Lab1
or M E/​E M A  307 Mechanics of Materials Lab
E P 271 Engineering Problem Solving I3
or COMP SCI 310 Problem Solving Using Computers
M E 231 Introductory Engineering Graphics2
M S & E 350 Introduction to Materials Science3
M E 361 Thermodynamics3
E C E 376 Electrical and Electronic Circuits3
or PHYSICS 321 Electric Circuits and Electronics
Computing elective3
Total Credits27

Nuclear Engineering Core Requirement 

Radiation Sciences Core
N E 305 Fundamentals of Nuclear Engineering3
N E 405 Nuclear Reactor Theory3
N E 408 Ionizing Radiation3
N E 412 Nuclear Reactor Design5
N E 427 Nuclear Instrumentation Laboratory2
N E 428 Nuclear Reactor Laboratory2
MED PHYS/​B M E/​H ONCOL/​PHYSICS  501 Radiological Physics and Dosimetry3
N E 571 Economic and Environmental Aspects of Nuclear Energy3
Total Credits24

Medical Physics Electives

Select nine credits 19
Radiobiology
Radionuclides in Medicine and Biology
Physics of Radiotherapy
The Physics of Diagnostic Radiology
Health Physics and Biological Effects (Recommended)
Medical Image Science: Mathematical and Conceptual Foundations
Non-Ionizing Diagnostic Imaging
Total Credits9
1

Courses meeting the Medical Physics Electives requirement are MED PHYS courses numbered 400 and above and selected Physics courses at or above the 400 level. No more than 3 credits of  N E 699 Advanced Independent Study, may be used to meet this requirement. (Refer to page 9 in NE Curriculum Handbook).

 Introduction to Engineering

INTEREGR 110 Introduction to Engineering1
INTEREGR 170 Design Practicum2
Total Credits3

Technical Electives

Technical Electives (not to be confused with Nuclear Engineering Electives or Medical Physics Electives) must be chosen from courses offered by the College of Engineering, or by the departments of Physics, Mathematics, Computer Science, or Chemistry.3
Total Credits3

Communication Skills 

ENGL 100 Introduction to College Composition3
or LSC 100 Science and Storytelling
or COM ARTS 100 Introduction to Speech Composition
or ESL 118 Academic Writing II
E P D 275 Technical Presentations2
E P D 397 Technical Communication3
Total Credits8

 Liberal Studies Electives

College of Engineering Liberal Studies Requirements
Complete Requirements 116
Total Credits16
1

Students must take 16 credits that carry H, S, L, or Z breadth designators. These credits must fulfill the following subrequirements:

  1. A minimum of two courses from the same department or program. At least one of these two courses must be designated as above the elementary level (I, A, or D) in the course listing.
  2. A minimum of 6 credits designated as humanities (H, L, or Z in the course listing), and an additional minimum of 3 credits designated as social science (S or Z in the course listing). Foreign language courses count as H credits. Retroactive credits for language courses may not be used to meet the Liberal Studies credit requirement (they can be used for subrequirement 1 above).
  3. At least 3 credits in courses designated as ethnic studies (lower case “e” in the course listing). These courses may help satisfy subrequirements 1 and 2 above, but they only count once toward the total required. Note: Some courses may have “e” designation but not have H, S, L, or Z designation; these courses do not count toward the Liberal Studies requirement.

For information on credit load, adding or dropping courses, course substitutions, pass/fail, auditing courses, dean's honor list, repeating courses, probation, and graduation, see the College of Engineering Official Regulations.

Honors in Undergraduate Research Program

Qualified undergraduates may earn an Honor in Research designation on their transcript and diploma by completing 8 credits of undergraduate honors research, including a senior thesis. Further information is available in the department office.

Nuclear Engineering Scholars And Distinguished Scholars Program

Students who achieve at least a 3.0 GPA in their first semester, and maintain it throughout their career, may be designated Scholars. They also may be exempted from some formal requirements for the Bachelor of Science in Nuclear Engineering degree other than total credits. However, they must meet certain restrictions on the distribution of courses chosen. Students who achieve at least a 3.70 grade point average (GPA) for the first semester of the freshman year or a 3.5 GPA for the first four semesters, may be designated Distinguished Scholars. These students, with the approval of their advisor, may be exempted from most formal requirements for the Bachelor of Science in Nuclear Engineering degree other than the total credit hours, so long as they maintain a satisfactory performance record and the main thrust of their work is along the lines of nuclear engineering education. The general education and liberal studies requirements must be met by Scholars and Distinguished Scholars. Students transferring into the nuclear engineering department may be eligible to qualify for either of these programs as late as the beginning of the seventh semester.

Early Acceptance Into the Graduate Program in Medical Physics

The University of Wisconsin-Madison has one of the top graduate programs in Medical Physics.  It is part of the Medical School.  Graduates of the program often are responsible for radiation treatment or imaging usually in a hospital, or they design the equipment used in those procedures.  Since this program does not have an associated undergraduate program, our degrees are excellent preparation for his program.

Qualified students in our Nuclear Engineering undergraduate program are given early consideration for admission into Medical Physics.  If you would like to be considered for admission into Medical Physics.  If you would like to be considered for this honor, you should provide the following information to the Chair of the Engineering Physics Department before the end of your Junior year:

  1. An official or unofficial transcript from your undergraduate program
  2. A list of courses you plan to take to complete your BS degree (ordered by semester)
  3. A list of courses you would plan to take to complete your MS in Medical Physics
  4. A cover letter describing your interest in the program

At the same time (spring of your junior year) apply for admission to the M.S. Medical Physics Graduate Program (deadline is June 25) with a start date that coincides with the fall after completion of your BS in Nuclear Engineering.

You should contact the Medical Physics department for more details of their program if you have additional questions.

  • an ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems. This includes:
  1. an ability to apply knowledge of basic mathematics, science and engineering.
  2. an ability to use advanced mathematical and computational techniques to analyze, model, and design physical systems consisting of solid and fluid components under steady state and transient conditions.
  3. an ability to design a system, component or process to meet desired needs.
  4. an ability to use the techniques, skills and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice.
  • an ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data.
  • an ability to function on multi-disciplinary teams.
  • knowledge of professional and ethical standards.
  • an ability to communicate effectively.
  • the broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global and societal context.
  • a recognition of the need for, and ability to engage in life-long learning.
  • a knowledge of contemporary issues.

SAMPLE FOUR-YEAR PLAN

First Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
CHEM 10915E M A 20133
MATH 2215MATH 2224
Communications A3STAT 224 or 3243
INTEREGR 1101M E 2312
INTEREGR 17022Liberal Studies Elective3
 16 15
Second Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
MATH 2344MATH 3203
PHYSICS 2025PHYSICS 241 or 2053
E M A 2023M E 3613
E P 271 or COMP SCI 3103E M A 3033
E P D 275 or COM ARTS 1052E M A/​M E  3071
 Liberal Studies Elective3
 17 16
Third Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
N E 3053N E 4053
MATH 3213N E 4083
M S & E 3503CBE/​B M E  32054
Technical Elective3Computing Elective3
Liberal Studies Elective4E C E 376 or PHYSICS 3213
 16 16
Fourth Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
N E 4113N E 4125
N E 4272N E 4282
Nuclear Engineering Elective3N E 5713
Nuclear Engineering Elective3Nuclear Engineering Elective3
Liberal Studies Elective3Liberal Studies Elective3
E P D 3973 
 17 16
Total Credits 129
1

Students should take CHEM 109 Advanced General Chemistry, 5 cr; students with inadequate preparation in high school chemistry may substitute CHEM 103 General Chemistry I and CHEM 104 General Chemistry II for a total of 9 credits. Three credits of Chem 103/104 may be counted towards Technical Electives credits.

2

Students who were not able to take INTEREGR 170 Design Practicum as freshmen may, with the approval of their advisor, substitute 2 credits of electives from courses offered in the College of Engineering or in the Departments of Chemistry, Computer Sciences, Mathematics, and Physics.

3

Students may substitute PHYSICS 201 General Physics, 5 credits, for E M A 201 Statics, 3 credits, with the approval of their advisor.

4

M E 306 Mechanics of Materials and M E/​E M A  307 Mechanics of Materials Lab are acceptable substitutions for E M A 303 Mechanics of Materials and E M A/​M E  307 Mechanics of Materials Lab.

5

M E 363 Fluid Dynamics and M E 364 Elementary Heat Transfer are acceptable substitutions for CBE/​B M E  320 Introductory Transport Phenomena.

Radiation Sciences Option in Nuclear Engineering

EXAMPLE FOUR YEAR PLAN

First Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
CHEM 10915E M A 20133
MATH 2215MATH 2224
Communications A3STAT 224 or 3243
INTEREGR 1101M E 2312
INTEREGR 17022Liberal Studies Elective3
 16 15
Second Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
MATH 2344MATH 3203
PHYSICS 2025PHYSICS 241 or 2053
E M A 2023M E 3613
E P 271 or COMP SCI 3103E M A 3033
E P D 275 or COM ARTS 1052E M A/​M E  3071
 Liberal Studies Elective3
 17 16
Third Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
N E 3053N E 4053
MATH 3213N E 4083
M S & E 3503PHYSICS 3223
Technical Elective53Computing Elective3
Liberal Studies Elective4E C E 376 or PHYSICS 3213
 Free Elective1
 16 16
Fourth Year
FallCreditsSpringCredits
N E 4272N E 4125
MED PHYS/​B M E/​H ONCOL/​PHYSICS  5013N E 5713
Medical Physics Elective3N E 4282
Medical Physics Elective3Medical Physics Elective3
Liberal Studies Elective3Liberal Studies Elective3
E P D 3973 
 17 16
Total Credits 129
1

Students should take CHEM 109 Advanced General Chemistry, 5 cr.; students with inadequate preparation in high school chemistry may substitute CHEM 103 General Chemistry I and CHEM 104 General Chemistry II, for a total of 9 credits. Three credits of Chem 103/104 may be counted as Technical Electives credits

2

Students who were not able to take INTEREGR 170 Design Practicum as freshmen may, with the approval of their advisor, substitute 2 credits of electives from courses offered in the College of Engineering or in the Departments of Chemistry, Computer Science, Mathematics, and Physics.

3

Students may substitute PHYSICS 201 General Physics, 5 cr., for E M A 201 Statics, 3 cr., with the approval of their advisor.

4

M E 306 Mechanics of Materials and M E/​E M A  307 Mechanics of Materials Lab are acceptable substitutions for E M A 303 Mechanics of Materials and E M A/​M E  307 Mechanics of Materials Lab

5

PHYSICS 623 Electronic Aids to Measurement is recommended for students in the Radiation Sciences track. 

Advising

Each College of Engineering program has academic advisors dedicated to serving its students. Program advisors can help current College of Engineering students with questions about accessing courses, navigating degree requirements, resolving academic issues and more. Students can find their assigned advisor on the homepage of their student center. 

Engineering Career Services

Engineering Career Services (ECS) assists students in identifying pre-professional work-based learning experiences such as co-ops and summer internships, considering and applying to graduate or professional school, and finding full-time professional employment during their graduation year.

ECS offers two major career fairs per year, assists with resume writing and interviewing skills, hosts workshops on the job search, and meets one-on-one with students to discuss offer negotiations.

Students are encouraged to utilize the ECS office early in their academic careers. For comprehensive information on ECS programs and workshops, see the ECS website or call 608-262-3471.

Professors

Henderson (chair)
T. Allen
Blanchard
Bonazza
Crone
Drugan
Fonck
Hegna
Kammer
Lakes
Smith (also Mathematics)
Sovinec
Waleffe (also Mathematics)
Wilson

Associate Professors

M. Allen
Witt

Assistant Professors

Couet
Notbohm
Scarlat
Schmitz

Affiliate Faculty

See department website for list.

Facilities

Facilities available for instruction and research include:

Nuclear Reactor Laboratory
Nuclear Instrumentation Laboratory
Fluid Mechanics and Heat Transfer Laboratories
Plasma Physics Laboratories
Superconductivity and Cryogenics Laboratories
Instructional Computing Labs (in Computer Aided Engineering)