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The School of Education at UW–Madison is consistently ranked as one of the finest schools of education in the United States, and among the best in the world. The school embraces fields of study that define the human experience: education to challenge minds, health to improve lives, and the arts to enhance creative spirits, and also conducts world-class research to drive conversation forward. The school prepares students in a variety of disciplines and for a range of professional roles, including artist, teacher, and therapist.

Approximately 1,500 undergraduates are enrolled each year in the School of Education. While many students are pursuing teacher certification, a significant number are completing programs in the performing and visual arts, human movement, and human services.

The School of Education offers a broad array of undergraduate programs that reflect the wide range of disciplines housed in the school. Although undergraduate majors are not offered in all departments, all ten departments do offer courses to undergraduate students. The school's departments include: Art, Counseling Psychology, Curriculum and Instruction, Dance, Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis, Educational Policy Studies, Educational Psychology, Kinesiology, Rehabilitation Psychology and Special Education, and Theatre and Drama.

Most School of Education students, including those interested in teacher education, begin their academic careers with a "pre-professional" designation. Application to the professional component of the undergraduate program is made as prerequisite coursework is completed. Students admitted to the university as art, education studies, or theatre and drama majors enter directly into their professional program. Dance majors are admitted based on an audition.

Many programs within the school are selective and competitive. School of Education faculty seek committed, creative, and reflective students who are sensitive to differing perspectives. For this reason, most of the school's limited-enrollment programs use criteria beyond grade point average to determine professional program admission. For this reason, too, the school consistently encourages students to challenge themselves and their initial career choices through volunteer experiences, service learning courses, internships or paid work experiences, and study abroad.

Students find that the School of Education is their academic and administrative home—a source of advising, guidance, support, and community. Small class sizes in many pre-professional and professional courses allow students to develop a strong sense of community and to get ample individual attention from professors, instructors, and teaching assistants. Teaching staff are extremely willing to get to know their students and work with them to meet their goals. School of Education courses also provide students the chance to get to know their classmates well. The School of Education works to offer a caring, secure, and supportive environment that encourages taking risks, expanding personal boundaries, and developing into a professional.

All students pursuing their undergraduate degree in the School of Education must fulfill the following requirements:  

Note: Students at UW–Madison become certified to teach middle and high school English, Mathematics, Science and Social Studies subjects only through graduate-level coursework, not as undergraduates. Information about the master's degree program is available at uwteach.org and on the Curriculum and Instruction website. Science certification areas include Biology, Chemistry, Earth and Space Science, Environmental Studies, Physics, and Broad Field Science. UW–Madison offers certification in the Social Studies areas of Economics, Geography, History, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology and Broad Field Social Studies.

Academic Concerns and Status

Academic Actions and Exceptions 

Academic actions and exceptions are used to record a student's progress through the university and to document various administrative and academic situations. Actions can be grouped into two broad categories:

  • those that permit exceptions to program requirements and school/university policies and
  • those that affect a student's standing in the university—e.g., probation or transferring from one program to another.

As the undergraduate dean's office, Education Academic Services (EAS) is responsible for reviewing, approving, documenting, and sometimes initiating academic actions and exceptions. To be posted to a student's record, exceptions must go through several steps. Exceptions may be initiated either by program faculty/staff or by EAS staff. EAS staff and faculty/staff often consult about a specific exception. Once an exception has been approved, it is processed either as an official "Dean's action" or as a DARS exception. Students can find a record of dean's actions on their printed unofficial transcript (also called the student record) or on their DARS report. A DARS exception will be reflected in the individual student's DARS report. 

Exceptions to faculty approved program requirements generally include course substitutions and rarely involve course or program requirement waivers. Exceptions to campus or School policies include permission for adding or dropping a course beyond the deadlines, waiving senior or major residency requirements, extending the deadline for meeting a deficiency or finishing an Incomplete, and permitting students to repeat a course for credit. A request for an exception requires careful consideration from all parties involved. Students should be prepared to explain the reasoning behind a request and offer supporting documentation. 

Substantial consultation time with faculty, staff, and/or deans may be required, so students should not expect to receive an immediate answer to a request during the initial appointment.

Academic Standing: Dean's List, Academic Probation, Etc.

To remain in good academic standing in the School of Education, students must earn both a semester grade point average (GPA) and a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.5. While the 2.5 grade point average may not be sufficient to permit students to be considered for admission to their program of choice, it is the minimum required to remain in the School of Education. This may be substantially higher than minimum grade point average requirements in other schools/colleges on campus.

Dean's List

Students have at least a 2.5 cumulative GPA and 3.5 or higher for the semester. Students must have received no incompletes in graded courses, no unreported grades, or end-of-semester academic actions for the semester. Credit/no credit and pass/fail courses are not considered in meeting the requirements for the Dean's List.

Probation

A student's grade point average for a particular semester falls below 2.5, while the cumulative campus GPA remains at or above 2.5. Students must earn a minimum 2.5 grade point average on the next semester's coursework to be removed from probation status.

Strict Probation

Strict Probation occurs when either (1) a student's cumulative GPA falls below a 2.5 OR (2) a student already on probation earns less than a 2.5 grade point average for the subsequent semester. To be in good standing, students on strict probation must earn both a 2.5 GPA on the next semester's coursework and also have a cumulative GPA of 2.5 by the end of the next semester. Students on Strict Probation status have an enrollment hold placed on their record for the subsequent semester. These students are not permitted to enroll until they have met with an EAS advisor.

Continued Strict Probation

A student already on strict probation obtained a 2.5 GPA or above on the next semester's coursework, but the cumulative GPA is still below 2.5. Once both grade point averages are at or above 2.5, the student will be in good academic standing. Students on Continued Strict Probation status have an enrollment hold placed on their record for the subsequent semester. These students are not permitted to enroll until they have met with an EAS advisor.

May Not Continue in the School of Education

Students on strict probation or continued strict probation who earn less than a 2.5 GPA on the next semester's work will receive notice that they may not continue in the School of Education. Students on May Not Continue status who do not seek or are not granted permission to continue may be withdrawn from the university and dropped from courses ("disenrolled"). Students are expected to contact EAS immediately to discuss options, including transfer to another school or college on campus, transfer to another university, or withdrawal from UW–Madison.

Continuation Requirement: Department of Kinesiology

All students admitted to undergraduate programs in the Department of Kinesiology, including Physical Education, must maintain a cumulative grade point average (GPA) of at least 2.75, based on all UW–Madison campus coursework. A student whose GPA falls below 2.75 will be placed on probation for the following semester. If the GPA remains below a 2.75 at the end of the probationary semester, the student will receive a discontinuation letter indicating that they must transfer out of the Department of Kinesiology. A hold will be placed on the student's registration for the second semester following the probationary semester, until the transfer is complete. Students in this situation must transfer to another School of Education program, another UW–Madison school/college, to another institution altogether, or must withdraw from the university.

If a student wishes to appeal being discontinued in the department, it must be done in writing to the Chair of the Undergraduate Studies Committee within 30 days of the date of the notification letter. The Undergraduate Studies Committee may request that the student appear in person at an Undergraduate Studies Committee meeting to present the case.

If a negative decision is reached by the Undergraduate Studies Committee, a student may choose to appeal in writing to the Department of Kinesiology Student Affairs Committee within 30 days of the date of the notification.

If a negative decision is reached by the Department’s Student Affairs Committee, a student may choose to appeal in writing to the Chair of the Department of Kinesiology within 30 days of the date of the notification.

If a negative decision is reached by the Chair of the Department of Kinesiology, a student may choose to follow the School of Education Grievance Policy.

In the event of a positive decision at any level, the student will be allowed to continue for one semester in order to raise the GPA to 2.75 or higher. A 2.75 cumulative GPA is required to graduate from the Department of Kinesiology.

Grievance Policy in the School of Education

Any student who feels that he or she has been treated unfairly by a faculty or staff member has the right to complain about the treatment and to receive a prompt hearing of the grievance, following these grievance procedures. The complaint may concern course grades, classroom treatment, program admission, or other issues. To insure a prompt and fair hearing of any complaint, and to protect both the rights of the student and the person at whom the complaint is addressed, the procedures below are used in the School of Education.

The person whom the complaint is directed against must be an employee of the School of Education. Any student or potential student may use these procedures unless the complaint is covered by other campus rules or contracts. The following steps are available within the School of Education when a student has a grievance:

  1. The student should first talk with the person against whom the grievance is directed. Most issues can be settled at this level. If the complaint is directed against a teaching assistant, and the student is not satisfied, the next step would be to talk to the TA's supervisor, who is usually the course professor. If the complaint is not resolved satisfactorily, the student may continue to step 2.
  2. If the complaint does not involve an academic department, the procedure outlined in Step 4 below should be followed. If the complaint involves an academic department, the student should contact the chair of the department. The chair will attempt to resolve the problem informally. If this cannot be done to the student's satisfaction, the student may submit the grievance to the chair in writing. This must be done within 60 calendar days of the alleged unfair treatment.
  3. On receipt of a written complaint, the chair will refer the matter to a departmental committee, which will obtain a written response from the person at whom the complaint is directed. This response shall be shared with the person filing the grievance. The chair will provide a timely written decision to the student on the action taken by the committee.
  4. If either party is not satisfied with the decision of the department, he or she has five working days from receipt of the decision to contact the dean's office (at the number below), indicating the intention to appeal. If the complaint does not involve an academic department in the school, the student must contact the dean's office within 60 calendar days of the alleged unfair treatment.
  5. In either case, there will be an attempt to resolve the issue informally by the associate dean. If this cannot be done, the complaint can be filed in writing with the dean's office. This must be done within 10 working days of the time the appealing party was notified that informal resolution was unsuccessful.
  6. On receipt of such a written complaint, the associate dean will convene a subcommittee of the school's Equity & Diversity Committee. This subcommittee may ask for additional information from the parties involved and may hold a hearing at which both parties will be asked to speak separately. The subcommittee will then make a written recommendation to the dean of the School of Education who will render a decision. Unless a longer time is negotiated, this written decision shall be made within 20 working days from the date when the grievance was filed with the dean's office.

Questions about these procedures can be directed to the School of Education Dean's Office, 377 Education Building, 1000 Bascom Mall, 608-262-1763.

State law contains additional provisions regarding discrimination and harassment. Wisconsin Statutes 36.12 reads, in part: "No student may be denied admission to, participation in or the benefits of, or be discriminated against in any service, program, course or facility of the system or its institutions or center because of the student's race, color, creed, religion, sex, national origin, disability, ancestry, age, sexual orientation, pregnancy, marital status or parental status." In addition, UW–System prohibits discrimination based on gender identity or gender expression. Students have the right to file discrimination and harassment complaints with the Office for Equity and Diversity, 179A Bascom Hall, 608-263-2378, kate.oconnor@wisc.edu, relay calls accepted.

Part-Time Enrollment Status

Students who choose part-time enrollment status or who anticipate falling below full-time enrollment status due to dropping a course should consult with an EAS advisor. Part-time enrollment may have important implications for any number of issues, including health insurance coverage or financial aid. It is especially important that athletes and international students consult with EAS and other advisors if considering part-time enrollment. Students who drop below 12 credits need not leave university housing.

Re-entry to Campus after an Absence

Students wishing to reenter UW–Madison after an absence of a semester or more must file a reentry application form. This form is available from the UW–Madison Office of Admissions and Recruitment. If an applicant is not in good academic standing, the reentry application will be referred to the associate dean.

Students admitted to the professional part of a program may leave UW–Madison for a maximum of two consecutive semesters (excluding summer sessions) and be eligible to reenter directly into the program. Students in this situation are not guaranteed immediate placement in a practicum or student teaching placement upon reentry, and graduation may be delayed because of prior commitments to continuing students. Students who leave the program for more than two consecutive semesters (excluding summer sessions) may be considered for readmission only on an individual basis. Lack of space in a program may preclude readmission directly into a program for any future semester. Given the individual circumstances, a student may be required to reapply to the program altogether.

The general policy above may be modified by any particular program so that the conditions of reentry match the structure of the professional program. Some programs require that students obtain prior approval to interrupt the program sequence. All students intending to be absent should leave with a firm understanding of the conditions guiding their reentry into their professional program. Consult with the appropriate faculty advisor and with Education Academic Services.

Residency (Major & Senior) Requirements

Major Residency

Students must complete at UW–Madison at least 15 credits in upper-level courses in the major. Some programs, e.g., Art, require more credits to meet major residency requirements. Upper-level courses are generally defined as those numbered 300 and above, but this varies by program area. Retroactive credits and credits granted by examination do not count toward the residency requirement.

Senior Residency

Seniors in the School of Education must complete the last 30 credits in residence. Special permission to take a portion of senior work either at another institution or by correspondence (via UW–Extension) must be obtained in advance from Education Academic Services. Coursework taken as part of a UW–Madison sponsored study abroad program does not count against senior residency. Students should discuss senior residency issues with their EAS advisor. Retroactive credits and credits granted by examination do not count toward the residency requirement.

Excess Credit and Satisfactory Progress

Excess Credits

Wisconsin resident undergraduates who have accumulated more than 165 completed credits will be assessed a 100% tuition surcharge on credits over 165, as required by the UW System Board of Regents. This policy was effective beginning Fall 2004. See Excess Cumulative Credits on the registrar's website for more information about this policy and the criteria used in counting cumulative, completed credits. Note: Students who have already been awarded a Bachelor's degree from any accredited institution are exempt from the tuition surcharge. Special students are also exempt. 

Satisfactory Progress: Second degree candidates and Education Special (non-degree-seeking) Students

The School of Education is enriched by admitting students with a previous degree to our programs. We welcome these students and encourage them to apply to our the School. At the same time, admission as a second-degree or Education Special (designated EDS or EDCS) student is a privilege granted by the School of Education. Second-degree and Education Special students are expected to make the same timely progress toward program completion as are initial-degree students. 

To ensure satisfactory progress, second-degree and Education Special students who are identified to have met any one of the criteria below will be required to confer with her/his program coordinator and the undergraduate academic dean for purposes of developing a formal plan for program completion:

  • Student has earned over 200 total credits.
  • Student enrolled for two consecutive semesters without completing requirements for the professional program to which the student was initially admitted.
  • Student withdrew from classes for two consecutive semesters.
  • Student failed to enroll in a required course when it was available, particularly those that are intermittently offered.
  • Student engages in other course selection patterns that result in his/her failing to make progress toward completion of initial program.

Students who do not meet the terms of the plan for program completion may be restricted to enrollment in specific courses or departments, prevented from enrolling entirely, or withdrawn from classes by the academic undergraduate dean after consultation with program faculty. Students may appeal the terms of the plan or any of the dean’s actions above under the provisions of the School of Education Grievance Policy.

Withdrawing from UW–Madison

Formal withdrawal procedures must be observed by individuals who wish to leave the university before completing the semester in progress. Students who leave the university without formally withdrawing may receive failing grades in all courses.

Courses and Course Enrollment

Attendance Policies

Faculty and instructors may require students to attend scheduled meetings of a class and/or to participate in other course-related activities, including distance activities. Students are responsible for materials presented in such meetings or activities. Because courses are designed and conducted in diverse ways, faculty and instructors are expected to inform students in writing at the beginning of each course if there are specific expectations for attendance/participation, including whether any component of the grade is based on such attendance/participation.

Auditing a Course

A student may audit a course only if the instructor consents and if no laboratory or performance skills are required. (The second restriction usually prevents students from auditing Dance or Art courses.) Auditors do not participate in classroom discussions or take examinations, but are expected to attend with reasonable regularity and do some assigned work.

Audited courses carry no degree credits, are not graded, do not count in determining full-time/part-time load for enrollment certification in an academic term, and do not meet degree requirements for School of Education students. Students interested in auditing a course should confer with their EAS advisor. The deadline to change a course from credit to audit is the end of the fourth week of classes; no exceptions to this deadline are permitted.

Concurrent Enrollment at Two Institutions 

School of Education students may occasionally choose to take courses at another institution—e.g., Madison College or Independent Learning through UW–Extension—while being a fully enrolled student on the UW–Madison campus. This is generally permitted, but does require a specific dean's action. Full-time or part-time student status is usually determined by the credits taken at UW–Madison only; thus, students who take only nine credits on campus and three credits at another institution may not be considered full-time students.

Credit Overload Permission

The School of Education allows students to carry a maximum of 18 credits per semester without special permission. School of Education undergraduates may, with an academic dean's permission, enroll for more than 18 credits in a semester. Students must confer with a School of Education academic dean about such a request. Students must be in excellent academic standing to be considered for a credit overload and will be liable for the additional tuition costs beyond 18 credits. 

During summer sessions, students may, as a rule, carry one credit per week of instruction. The maximum credit load for Education students for the entire summer session is 12. Session-specific limits follow the rule of 1 credit per week of instruction, except 9 credits are allowed in the Eight-Week General Session. Students must obtain permission from an academic dean to carry an overload in any of the summer sessions.

Directed/Independent Study

Directed Study, also called Independent Study, offers the student an opportunity to work with a School of Education faculty member on an individual topic of interest. Most School of Education departments make directed study courses available to students on the basis of the student's preparation and motivation and a faculty member's willingness to accept the student in such an endeavor. Directed Study courses are generally numbered 199, 299, 399, and 699.

This study option is intended primarily for advanced students who have a depth of knowledge in a field, the self-discipline necessary for independent work, and strong motivation to pursue a special project. Some program areas limit the number of Directed Study credits that can be applied to major or minor requirements. 

Directed Study is taken as a supplement to, but not as a replacement for, available course offerings. In this way, it may be used to expand areas of particularly strong interest. Extra responsibility is required from the faculty member involved, and no member of the faculty is obligated to accept a proposal for a directed study project. Students should have a well-defined outline of the topic to be studied before discussing the project with a faculty member. 

Both the student and instructor must follow UW–Madison's Policy on Directed/Independent Study for Undergraduates. Important components of this document include, but are not limited to:

  • The student's responsibility to develop a written study plan, in collaboration and agreement with the instructor, consistent with the responsibilities of the instructor. The study plan will include expectations for learning and student work, the time and place for regular meetings, the number of credits to be earned, and any other issues related to the learning experience.
  • Guidelines for assigning the appropriate number of credits to the Directed Study.
  • Responsibilities of the Directed Study instructor.
  • The approval process for enrolling in a Directed Study after the course add deadline (usually the end of the second week of class in fall and spring semesters).

Independent Learning Course Enrollment

Students occasionally elect to take an Independent Learning course through the University of Wisconsin–Extension. Many of the courses offered through Independent Learning (IL) can count toward specific degree requirements and students have an entire year to complete the coursework. Individuals interested in enrolling in an Independent Learning course should note the following important issues:

Course Equivalencies

Independent Learning courses are not automatically transferable as equivalent UW–Madison campus courses—even when the Independent Learning course carries the same number and title. Use the Transfer Information System (TIS) to ensure that the Independent Learning course is equivalent to the campus required course. Faculty and dean's offices may have some discretion in permitting courses to count for requirements even when they are not coded as exactly equivalent; students should see their EAS advisor.

Concurrent Enrollment

UW–Extension is an entirely separate institution from UW–Madison. Thus, UW–Madison students must have permission from their academic dean to be enrolled concurrently in another higher education institution. Permission for concurrent enrollment is granted routinely for School of Education students through EAS. Students should go to the registrar's office website for the permission form. The completed form indicates permission for concurrent enrollment and, in some circumstances, provides for a waiver of the tuition for the Independent Learning course (see additional information below). Students should take this form to Education Academic Services, 139 Education Building, 1000 Bascom Mall, and meet with an advisor. Send it to Independent Learning after it has been approved at EAS.

Tuition Waiver

The tuition for an Independent Learning course may be waived with the academic dean's permission, although the student is still responsible for other course enrollment fees. Students are eligible for a tuition waiver if they register for an Independent Learning course during the semester they are concurrently enrolled at UW–Madison. In some cases, students may be allowed to register for Independent Learning classes once they have enrolled in courses for the subsequent semester, linking their Independent Learning registration with the credits for the succeeding semester. Students interested in receiving a tuition waiver must be enrolled full time (at least 12 credits) at UW–Madison, and have no more than 18 credits after adding the Independent Learning course. Students should see their EAS advisor for additional information on these policies. As indicated above, download and complete the form and submit to EAS, 139 Education Building, 1000 Bascom Mall. This stamped form must then be sent to Independent Learning, with a copy remaining at EAS.

Posting Independent Learning courses to the UW–Madison transcript

Independent Learning courses are posted to the campus transcript by staff at the Office of Admissions and Recruitment. A official transcript for an Independent Learning course must be submitted to this office.

Timing for course completion and degree posting

Independent Learning courses require a substantial time commitment. Students should not plan to begin an Independent Learning course only a few weeks before it must be completed! Perhaps even more important, students completing an Independent Learning course to meet degree requirements during their last semester on campus should be aware that the Independent Learning course must be completed prior to the University's official graduation date for that semester. The completion date listed on the UW–Extension transcript must be on or before the UW–Madison degree completion date or the student's degree will be awarded after the subsequent semester. For example, if a student's UW–Extension transcript indicates a course completion date of May 25, but the UW–Madison degree completion date is May 23, the student's degree will be posted for the subsequent August graduation date, not for the May graduation day. This could create serious problems for teacher education students hoping to secure a position. For this reason, students completing final degree requirements via Independent Learning should consult carefully with EAS and Independent Learning staff regarding the timing of their course completion and degree posting.

Late Course Adds or Drops

Course enrollment regulations must be followed when adding and dropping courses. Students are responsible for knowing and complying with the published deadlines; see the registrar's website for deadlines. Students are expected to check their academic records routinely to minimize the need for late drops based on enrollment errors.

Late Course Add

Students must obtain instructor, departmental, and dean's approval to add a course after the course add deadline. See the registrar's website for instructions.

Late Course Drop

After the drop deadline, courses may be dropped only with the permission of Education Academic Services. Such permission is not granted routinely, but only in unusual circumstances. Students seeking a late drop will be required to complete a formal request form and may be asked to supply a written justification, medical or other documentation, and/or proof of having consulted with the course instructor. Requests for backdated drops due to ignorance of campus drop deadlines or to remove a "DR" from the student's record will not be honored. Students seeking a late drop must schedule a meeting with an EAS advisor.

The student will meet with the advisor to discuss the drop request. The advisor will collect information about the circumstances around the request. If appropriate, the advisor will warn about the drop's possible consequences for financial aid, insurance coverage, student status (for international students), etc. The decision around the late drop may or may not be made during this meeting. Advisors may confer with instructors as needed to verify students' reports and obtain additional information. Advisors may also require students to contact the instructor and may also consult with one another and with the associate dean about specific cases. Students will be informed via email or telephone about the disposition of their request.

Repeating Courses

Most courses on the UW–Madison campus may be taken only once for purposes of credit. Some courses may be repeated a limited number of times for credit. Other courses may be repeated an unlimited number of times for credit. When courses are taken more than once, all grades and their associated grade points are included in the cumulative campus grade point average.

Some School of Education professional programs may permit students to retake courses for admission eligibility purposes only. Students should consult EAS staff with questions regarding repeated courses.

Degrees, "Double Majors," and Graduation

Additional Major or "Double Major"

School of Education students may be permitted to complete an additional major with their School of Education degree program. Students must be admitted to the professional part of their degree program to be eligible to add an additional major; pre-professional students cannot add another major.

Education students wishing to complete an additional major in the College of Letters & Science must complete these steps:

  1. Contact the department that houses the major of interest. Meet with the undergraduate major advisor there, if appropriate. Complete the Major Declaration form and obtain departmental approval (usually a signature or stamp).
  2. Take the form to Education Academic Services, 139 Education Building, 1000 Bascom Mall, and ask for a dean's action to permit the additional major. Staff at EAS will take the action and send the form to the registrar's office. Note: Students in the School of Education should not take the form to the L&S Student Academic Affairs office—even if this is the advice of departmental staff. Requests for an additional major will be rejected by the registrar's office for lack of the appropriate dean's approval.

Students will be granted a degree at the end of the fall, spring, or summer semesters in which all School of Education degree requirements are complete. Graduation will not be postponed if students have an unfinished additional major or certificate program that is not required for the degree.

Exceptions to the requirements of an additional major or certificate program must be approved by the department and school/college dean's office in which the major or certificate program is located. 

Credits-to-Degree

School of Education programs require a minimum of 120 credits in all programs for graduation, although programs may require more. To earn 120 credits in four years (eight semesters), students must average 15 credits per semester. The number of credits carried each semester may depend upon a student's preparation, motivation, course selection, employment, and extracurricular activities.

Degree Audit Reporting System (DARS)

At UW–Madison, a DARS report is used to document a student's progress toward the completion of their degree. This degree audit identifies the requirements that have already been completed, and also those that remain unsatisfied. A DARS report can offer suggestions about appropriate courses that may be taken to meet specific requirements and can assist in the academic planning process. 

Students can access DARS reports through their Student Center in My UW–Madison. Go to the Academics tab and find DARS on the dropdown menu.

DARS also has a "what-if" function. This feature makes it possible to request a DARS report as if pursuing another program or major on campus. It is an excellent tool if considering a new or additional area of study. School of Education students in a pre-professional classification such as Pre-Elementary (PRE) should request a "what if" DARS report of their professional program of interest.

DARS is not intended to replace student contact with academic advisers. It creates more time in an advising appointment to discuss course options, research opportunities, graduate school, or issues of personal interest or concern to students.

DARS is the document of record, i.e., certifying document of degree completion, for program areas in the School of Education.

Dual Degrees

Students may be permitted to complete two degrees simultaneously. For example, students may complete two degree programs in the School of Education or may choose a degree program in the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences along with their School of Education degree. Not all schools/colleges permit dual degrees—e.g., this is not permitted by the College of Letters & Science or by the College of Engineering. Students should confer with an academic dean regarding the ability and feasibility of completing two degrees programs simultaneously. Students wishing to earn two undergraduate degrees must follow these academic policies:

  • If the two degrees to be earned are within the School of Education, at least 30 additional credits and all course and grade point average requirements for the second degree must be completed for the second degree. When the first degree requires 120 credits, a minimum of 150 credits for most majors will be required. The two degree programs must differ sufficiently to permit the total credits to be accumulated. Courses may count toward the fulfillment of both degree programs. Permission to complete two degrees simultaneously requires the academic dean's approval. This approval, and the formal academic action permitting the dual degree work, should be sought as early as possible to ensure that it is feasible to complete both degrees.
  • If the two degrees to be earned are from two different schools/colleges (one degree in Education and one degree in another school or college on this campus), the following academic policies shall be followed:
  1. Permission to complete two degrees simultaneously requires academic dean's approval from both schools/colleges. Students should see their current dean's office for the required paperwork.
  2. Admission into the other school/college shall be based on the admission criteria for that particular school/college and, when necessary, particular program.
  3. The two degree programs must differ sufficiently so that the combined total requirements for the two degrees are at least 150 credits.
  4. The student's program must be reviewed and approved in both colleges before the start of a student's senior year in residence.
  5. The degree from each college will be awarded simultaneously.
  6. Exceptions to degree requirements must be taken by staff from the school/college linked to the particular degree.

Grades and Grading

Grading System

See Enrollment and Records for detailed information on the campus grading system, including the list of possible grades and their impact on a student's grade point average.

Credit/No Credit Courses

Courses designated as being offered on a Credit/No Credit basis are indicated on the transcript as either CR, meaning the student earned the credits for which the course was offered, or N, meaning that the student did not earn any credit even though enrolled for the course. Students may not take such courses on any other basis.

"F" Grade Policies

If the course is repeated, the original F will remain on the transcript and will be included in computing the GPA. If a grade of F, N (no credit), or U (unsatisfactory) is received in student teaching or in courses within required practica, the course may be repeated only if the faculty adviser, the supervisor of the practicum or student teaching, and the appropriate associate dean gives approval. A third attempt to register in a course under these conditions is not allowed.

Incompletes

A grade of "Incomplete" may be reported for a student who has carried a subject with passing grades until near the end of the semester and then, because of illness or other unusual and substantiated cause beyond the student's control, has been unable to take or complete the final examination, or to complete some limited amount of term work. An Incomplete is not given to a student who stays away from a final examination except as indicated above. In the absence of substantiated cause, the grade shall be F. Even with such proof, if the student's work has convinced the instructor that s/he cannot pass the course, the grade shall be F.

Any Incomplete taken by School of Education students must be completed by the end of the student's next semester of residence (specifically, by the last day of classes), excluding Summer Sessions. If the work is not completed by this deadline, the Incomplete will lapse into a Failure unless the time limit has been extended in writing by the dean's office. (Note that this differs for College of Letters & Science students: Incompletes must be completed by the end of the fourth week of classes of the student's next semester of residence at UW–Madison, excluding Summer Sessions.)

Pass/Fail Grading

All undergraduate students are eligible to take a course on a pass/fail basis if they request the option prior to the deadline and are in good academic standing at the time of the request. Good academic standing for this purpose means that students have a minimum 2.5 cumulative grade-point average based on UW–Madison coursework. Undergraduates may carry one course on a pass/fail basis per term. (Each year’s summer sessions collectively count as a single term.)

Pass/fail can be chosen only for elective courses. Required courses cannot be taken on a pass/fail basis. The School of Education may reject pass/fail requests for non-elective work, but it is the student’s responsibility to be sure that the requested course is an elective. Courses taken on a pass/fail basis will not count for non-elective requirements—even if they would normally count toward such requirements.

Students may submit pass/fail requests via their Student Center link from the time that they register until midnight on the Friday at the end of the fourth week of fall and spring semesters. For modular and summer session courses, pass/fail requests must be submitted by midnight Friday of the week in which the session is one-fourth completed. Students may not cancel or add the pass/fail option after the deadline for submitting Pass/Fail Option Forms.

Instructors are not notified when a student elects the pass/fail option. (Students can see whether a course is pass/fail in their Student Center.) When a course is taken on a pass/fail basis, the instructor reports a letter grade, which is converted by the registrar to an S (satisfactory) or U (unsatisfactory). The grade of S shall be recorded by the registrar in place of instructors' grades of A, AB, B, BC, or C. The grade of U shall be recorded by the registrar in place of instructors' grades of D or F. Neither the S nor the U is used in computing the grade-point average. A student must earn at least a C to receive credit for the course.

Please note that courses completed on a pass/fail basis do not apply toward Liberal Studies, major, minor, or professional education requirements for graduation. Students planning graduate study should not take courses on a pass/fail basis if these are pre-professional requirements for admission to graduate and/or professional programs. Individuals who are undecided about a major should avoid taking a course on a pass/fail basis that might later become a required course needed to complete a major. Students may wish to consult with an advisor before taking a course on a pass/fail basis.

Six-Weeks (Midterm) Grades

Only first-year students receive midterm, or "six-weeks" grades. Midterm grades for first-year students are prepared at the end of the sixth week of classes and are made available to students in their Student Center in My UW on Monday of the eighth week. An email is sent out to all students with six-week grades informing them of their availability in the Student Center.

The midterm grade report provides students with important feedback about course enrollment and performance before the course drop deadline. Students should check their six-week grade report to make sure all courses are listed and grades indicated. An "NW" means that "No Work" has been turned in; students who have been attending the course should contact the instructor immediately. In the case of a course registration problem, students should see their EAS advisor immediately.

Grades from Transfer Courses

Grades from transfer courses are not posted to the UW–Madison transcript; however, the School of Education uses all attempted transferable coursework to determine program admission eligibility and selection grade point average. Students should be aware that grades earned at another institution will be included in admission calculations. (Courses for which an "F" is earned do not transfer to UW–Madison.) Student should see their School of Education advisor if they have additional questions about this policy.

Program Admissions

Last 60 Credit Rule

Two grade point averages will be calculated to determine candidates' eligibility to programs. GPAs will be calculated using

  1. all transferable college level coursework attempted, and
  2. the last 60 credits attempted.

The higher GPA of these two will be used for purposes of determining eligibility. If fewer than 60 credits have been attempted, all credits will be used to calculate the GPA. Graded graduate coursework will also be used in all GPA calculations. ("Attempted" coursework indicates coursework for which a grade has been earned.)

The use of the last 60 credits does not supersede other eligibility requirements. For example, when a minimum GPA on prerequisite courses is required, or a minimum major GPA is required to be eligible for admission, all required courses will be used in calculating this GPA. This will include courses taken prior to the last 60 credits. A cumulative GPA, however, will still be calculated based on the last 60 college credits attempted.

Currently, retention and graduation GPAs are based on all credits attempted at UW–Madison as an undergraduate student. If each semester's GPA after admission to the program meets the required GPA for retention, the student will be allowed to continue and complete the program.

This policy does not apply to certification programs in Music Education, as the degree is granted from the College of Letters and Science, not the School of Education.

Contact EAS for additional information regarding the interpretation of this policy.

Students with a Previous Degree

A prospective student who already holds an undergraduate degree is admitted to the School of Education as either an Education Special student or a Second Degree student, depending on the academic area of interest and the individual's previous coursework. The term "Special Student" indicates that the student has an interest in pursuing certification in a subject area studied during the initial degree; the student does not receive a second degree for this "certification only" coursework. Second undergraduate degree students are seeking a second degree from the School of Education in an area that is different from the major coursework of the first degree. This degree may, or may not, include teacher certification. Candidates for limited enrollment programs must meet all admission eligibility requirements for the program and must compete with the eligible applicants for program admission.

Special Students

Applicants must file an undergraduate application with the Office of Admissions and Recruitment. Education Special students not yet admitted to a professional program are given an EDS classification, are not eligible for financial aid, and enroll last with the other special students on campus. Candidates seeking Special student status in open enrollment programs must obtain written permission for admission from the relevant program coordinator and must submit a professional program application to Education Academic Services. Candidates seeking admission to a limited enrollment program must meet all admission eligibility requirements for the program and must compete with other eligible candidates for program admission. Applicants admitted to a certification professional program become Education Certification Special students (EDCS classification) to distinguish them from Special students not so admitted. Students with an EDCS classification may be eligible for financial aid. Continuing EDCS students may register with undergraduates having junior status.

Second Degree Candidates

Students who wish to earn a second baccalaureate degree in the School of Education must file an undergraduate application with the Office of Admissions and Recruitment and must file a professional program application with Education Academic Services. Second degree students not yet admitted to a professional program are given a pre-professional classification. Second degree candidates must:

  • be seeking a new major that is substantially different from their previous degree work;
  • complete at least 15 upper-level credits in the new major;
  • complete at least 30 credits beyond their previous coursework.

The determination of whether a student should be admitted as a second degree candidate or Education Special student is made by the faculty advisor in consultation with EAS staff after analyzing the student's remaining requirements. The faculty advisor will determine the specific remaining requirements for students admitted to a program. In addition to completing the requirements specific to the program(s) of interest, returning students must also complete any relevant campus-wide requirements, complete the requirements specific to individual program areas such as the Environmental Education requirement, and satisfy any high school deficiencies identified at the time of admission to UW–Madison. Students are strongly encouraged to discuss their academic plans with their faculty advisor and must make satisfactory progress toward program completion - see Satisfactory Progress/Excess credits for details.

Students seeing a second degree in Kinesiology–Exercise & Movement Science or Athletic Training must complete PSYCH 202 Introduction to Psychology as part of the professional program if an equivalent course was not completed during the initial baccalaureate degree.

School of Education Liberal Studies Requirements

How Students Meet REQUIREMENTS

The School of Education’s Liberal Studies Requirements automatically satisfy most of the University's General Education Requirements, including Ethnic Studies, Humanities/Literature, Social Studies, and Science. Students pursuing most School of Education degree program may also complete Communication Part B, Quantitative Reasoning Part A, and Quantitative Reasoning Part B through courses required by their degree program.

Beginning at Student Orientation and Registration (SOAR), School of Education academic advisors help each student determine how they can meet General Education Requirements while pursuing a specific degree program, or through exploration of a variety of interests. The General Education and Liberal Studies requirements provide an opportunity to do some academic exploration. If a student cannot complete a General Education requirement within the curriculum of their chosen School of Education program, academic advisors can offer suggestions for courses that meet the requirement and augment the student’s primary area of study.

Students with a previous undergraduate degree are not required to complete the Liberal Studies coursework.

LIBERAL STUDIES REQUIREMENTS

All students are required to complete a minimum of 40 credits of Liberal Studies coursework. Most Liberal Studies courses are offered by academic departments in the College of Letters & Science. Each course is assigned a number of descriptors that provide information about its content. For example, a breadth designation indicates what kind of course it is—a Science course, a Literature course, etc. Level designations describe how advanced the content of a course is in relation to other courses in the department—Elementary, Intermediate, Advanced, or Intermediate/Advanced level. Course listings in both Course Guide and Schedule of Classes (Class Search) provide breadth and level designations  Click on the course number to obtain this information. Students can also search for courses meeting specific breadth or level designations using either Course Guide and Schedule of Classes (Class Search).

UW–Madison breadth designations

Biological Science
Humanities
Literature
Natural Science
Physical Science
Social Science
Social or Natural Science
Humanities or Natural Science
Biological or Social Science
Humanities or Social Science

HUMANITIES

All students must complete a minimum of 9 credits, to include:

Literature (minimum of 2 credits)

Any course designated as Literature.

Fine Arts (minimum of 2 credits)

The courses listed below are approved for the Fine Arts requirement. Additional courses can be considered; students may consult with an advisor in Education Academic Services.

African Languages and Literature
AFRICAN/​AFROAMER  220 HipHop, Youth Culture, and Politics in Senegal3
AFRICAN/​AFROAMER  233 Global HipHop and Social Justice3
Afro-American Studies
AFROAMER 154 Hip-Hop and Contemporary American Society3
AFROAMER 156 Black Music and American Cultural History3
AFROAMER/​AFRICAN  220 HipHop, Youth Culture, and Politics in Senegal3
AFROAMER 225 Introduction to African American Dramatic Literature3
AFROAMER/​AFRICAN  233 Global HipHop and Social Justice3
AFROAMER/​ART HIST  241 Introduction to African Art and Architecture3
AFROAMER/​ART HIST  242 Introduction to Afro-American Art3
AFROAMER/​GEN&WS  267 Artistic/Cultural Images of Black Women3
AFROAMER/​MUSIC  308 Black Music (1920-Present): Rhythm Section and Combos2
AFROAMER/​MUSIC  309 Black Music (1920-Present): Vocalist/Trombone/Misc Instrumental2
AFROAMER/​MUSIC  310 Black Music (1920-Present): The Trumpet2
AFROAMER/​MUSIC  311 Black Music (1920-Present): The Saxophone2
AFROAMER/​DANCE/​MUSIC  318 Cultural Cross Currents: West African Dance/Music in the Americas3
AFROAMER 338 The Black Arts Movement3
AFROAMER/​GEN&WS  367 Art and Visual Culture: Women of the African Diaspora and Africa3
AFROAMER/​MUSIC  400 Music Cultures of the World: Africa, Europe, the Americas3
AFROAMER/​AFRICAN  413 Contemporary African and Caribbean Drama3-4
AFROAMER 456 Soul Music and the African American Freedom Movement3
American Indian Studies
AMER IND 325 American Indians in Film3
Art
Any course from the Department of Art
Art Education
ART ED/​CURRIC  322 Information Design for Visual Learning (Art Education)3
Art History
Any course from the Department of Art History
Communication Arts
COM ARTS 350 Introduction to Film3
COM ARTS 357 History of the Animated Film3
Dance
Any course from the Department of Dance
Design Studies
DS 120 Design: Fundamentals I3
English
ENGL 207 Introduction to Creative Writing: Fiction and Poetry Workshop3
ENGL 307 Creative Writing: Fiction and Poetry Workshop3
Folklore
FOLKLORE/​MUSIC  103 Introduction to Music Cultures of the World2
FOLKLORE/​DANCE/​THEATRE  321 Javanese Performance2
Gender and Women's Studies
GEN&WS/​AFROAMER  267 Artistic/Cultural Images of Black Women3
German
GERMAN/​JEWISH  267 Yiddish Song and the Jewish Experience3-4
Integrated Liberal Studies
ILS 203 Western Culture: Literature and the Arts I3
ILS 204 Western Culture: Literature and the Arts II3-4
Jewish Studies
JEWISH/​GERMAN  267 Yiddish Song and the Jewish Experience3-4
Literature in Translation
LITTRANS 207 Slavic Science Fiction through Literature and Film3
LITTRANS 231 Manga3
LITTRANS 232 Anime3
LITTRANS 233 Russian Life and Culture Through Literature and Art (to 1917)3-4
LITTRANS 234 Soviet Life and Culture Through Literature and Art (from 1917)3-4
LITTRANS 272 French Pop Culture3
LITTRANS 329 The Vampire in Literature and Film3
LITTRANS/​THEATRE  335 In Translation: The Drama of Henrik Ibsen3-4
LITTRANS/​THEATRE  336 In Translation: The Drama of August Strindberg3-4
Music
Any course from the Department of Music
Music Performance
Any course from the Department of Music Performance
Theatre
Any course from the Department of Theatre and Drama

Humanities Elective(s)

May include courses designated as Humanities, Literature, Humanities or Natural Science, Humanities or Social Science, elementary and intermediate level foreign language, or additional fine arts. May also count COM ARTS 105 Public SpeakingCOM ARTS 181 Elements of Speech-Honors Course, and any English department intermediate or advanced level creative writing or composition course toward this requirement (ESL classes and elementary level composition courses are excluded).

SOCIAL STUDIES (SOCIAL SCIENCE)

All students must complete a minimum of 9 credits. Select from courses with a breadth designation of Social Science, Social or Natural ScienceBiological or Social Science, or as Humanities or Social Science.

Teacher education, athletic training, and kinesiology students have unique requirements in this category; see below:

Teacher Education requirement

Teacher education students must complete a Local, State, and National Government requirement by enrolling in one of the following courses as part of the 9 credits:

Athletic Training and Kinesiology–Exercise and Movement Science

Athletic Training and Kinesiology–Exercise and Movement Science students must complete PSYCH 201 Introduction to PsychologyPSYCH 202 Introduction to Psychology, or PSYCH 281 Honors Course-Introduction to Psychology as part of the 9 credits.

SCIENCE

All students must complete a minimum of 9 credits, including one course designated as a Biological Science course and one designated as a Physical Science course. All students must complete one science course with a laboratory. The lab course can also count toward the Biological or Physical Science requirement if it has the requisite breadth designation.

Biological Science

Any course with a breadth designation of Biological Science, or as Biological or Social Science.

Physical Science

Any course with a breadth designation of Physical Science.

Science Elective(s)

Other courses with a breadth designation of Biological Science, Physical Science, Natural Science, Social or Natural Science, Humanities or Natural Science, or as Biological or Social Science.

Laboratory requirement

Most sciences with lab sections are identified as such in Class Search and Course Guide. An AP Biology score of 4 or 5 will also fulfill the Laboratory requirement.

In addition to courses with lab sections, the following courses include some lab experience and will meet the lab requirements for students in the School of Education:

Course options within the College of Letters & Science
ANTHRO 105 Principles of Biological Anthropology3
ASTRON 100 Survey of Astronomy4
ATM OCN 101 Weather and Climate4
BOTANY 100 Survey of Botany3
GEOSCI 100 General Geology3
PHYSICS 109 Physics in the Arts3
Suggested courses options outside the College of Letters & Science
AGRONOMY 100 Principles and Practices in Crop Production4
BOTANY/PL PATH 123 Plants, Parasites, and People3
FOOD SCI/​MICROBIO  324 Food Microbiology Laboratory2
HORT 120 Survey of Horticulture3
PL PATH/​BOTANY  123 Plants, Parasites, and People3

Cultural and Historical Studies

All students must complete three requirements met by separate courses. Any of these courses can also be used to meet the Humanities or Social Studies (Social Sciences) requirements if it has the relevant breadth designation. A single course cannot satisfy more than one of the three Cultural and Historical Studies requirements listed below.

Ethnic Studies (minimum 3 credit course)

The Ethnic Studies requirement is intended to increase understanding of the culture and contributions of persistently marginalized racial or ethnic groups in the United States, and to equip students to respond constructively to issues connected with our pluralistic society and global community. Courses that meet this requirement have a specific ethnic studies designation that can be utilized in a course search.

United States or European History (minimum 3 credits)

The courses listed below count toward this requirement. Additional courses can be considered; students may consult with an advisor in Education Academic Services.

Afro-American Studies
AFROAMER 156 Black Music and American Cultural History3
AFROAMER 231 Introduction to Afro-American History3
AFROAMER 272 Race and American Politics from the New Deal to the New Right3
AFROAMER/​AFRICAN/​HISTORY/​POLI SCI  297 African and African-American Linkages: An Introduction4
AFROAMER 302 Undergraduate Studies in Afro-American History3
AFROAMER/​HISTORY  321 Afro-American History Since 19003-4
AFROAMER/​HISTORY  322 Afro-American History to 19003-4
AFROAMER/​GEN&WS  323 Gender, Race and Class: Women in U.S. History3
AFROAMER/​GEN&WS  324 Black Women in America: Reconstruction to the Present3
AFROAMER/​GEN&WS  326 Race and Gender in Post-World War II U.S. Society3
AFROAMER/​HISTORY  347 The Caribbean and its Diasporas3
AFROAMER/​HISTORY  393 Slavery, Civil War, and Reconstruction, 1848-18773-4
AFROAMER 456 Soul Music and the African American Freedom Movement3
AFROAMER/​MUSIC  509 Seminar in Afro-American Music History and Criticism3
AFROAMER/​HIST SCI/​MED HIST  523 Race, American Medicine and Public Health3
AFROAMER/​ED POL  567 History of African American Education3
AFROAMER/​HISTORY  628 History of the Civil Rights Movement in the United States3
AFROAMER 631 Colloquium in Afro-American History3
AFROAMER 671 Selected Topics in Afro-American History3
American Indian Studies
AMER IND 100 Introduction to American Indian Studies3
AMER IND 250 Indians of Wisconsin3
AMER IND/​ANTHRO  314 Indians of North America3
AMER IND 320 Native Peoples of the Southwest3
AMER IND/​HISTORY  490 American Indian History3-4
AMER IND/​SOC WORK  658 American Indian Affairs2-3
ASIAN AM/​CHICLA/​FOLKLORE  102 Introduction to Comparative Ethnic Studies3-4
ASIAN AM/​HISTORY  160 Asian American History: Movement and Dislocation3-4
ASIAN AM/​HISTORY  161 Asian American History: Settlement and National Belonging3-4
ASIAN AM/​SOC  220 Ethnic Movements in the United States3-4
ASIAN AM/​HISTORY/​LCA  246 Southeast Asian Refugees of the "Cold" War4
Chican@ and Latin@ Studies
CHICLA/​ASIAN AM/​FOLKLORE  102 Introduction to Comparative Ethnic Studies3-4
CHICLA 201 Introduction to Chicana/o and Latina/o Studies3
CHICLA/​GEN&WS/​HISTORY  245 Chicana and Latina History3
CHICLA 301 Chicana/o and Latina/o History3
CHICLA/​GEN&WS  332 Latinas: Self Identity and Social Change3
CHICLA/​HISTORY/​POLI SCI  422 Latino History and Politics3
CHICLA/​HISTORY  435 Colony, Nation, and Minority: The Puerto Ricans' World3
CHICLA/​HISTORY  461 The American West to18503-4
CHICLA/​HISTORY  462 The American West Since 18503-4
Educational Policy Studies
ED POL/​HISTORY  412 History of American Education3
ED POL/​AFROAMER  567 History of African American Education3
Gender and Women's Studies
GEN&WS/​HIST SCI/​MED HIST  431 Childbirth in the United States3
History—United States History
HISTORY 101 Amer Hist to the Civil War Era, the Origin & Growth of the U S4
HISTORY 102 American History, Civil War Era to the Present4
HISTORY 109 Introduction to U.S. History3-4
HISTORY 150 American Histories: The Nineteenth Century4
HISTORY/​ASIAN AM  160 Asian American History: Movement and Dislocation3-4
HISTORY/​ASIAN AM  161 Asian American History: Settlement and National Belonging3-4
HISTORY 201 The Historian's Craft (topic must be approved)3-4
HISTORY/​JEWISH  213 Jews and American Pop. Culture3-4
HISTORY/​JEWISH  219 The American Jewish Experience: From Shtetl to Suburb4
HISTORY 221 Explorations in American History (H)3-4
HISTORY 227 Explorations in the History of Race and Ethnicity3
HISTORY/​CHICLA/​GEN&WS  245 Chicana and Latina History3
HISTORY/​ASIAN AM/​LCA  246 Southeast Asian Refugees of the "Cold" War4
HISTORY 249 Sport, Recreation, & Society in the United States3-4
HISTORY/​LEGAL ST  261 American Legal History to 18603
HISTORY/​LEGAL ST  262 American Legal History, 1860 to the Present3
HISTORY 269 War, Race, and Religion in Europe and the United States, from the Scramble for Africa to Today3-4
HISTORY 272 History Study Abroad: United States History1-4
HISTORY/​AFRICAN/​AFROAMER/​POLI SCI  297 African and African-American Linkages: An Introduction4
HISTORY 302 History of American Thought, 1859 to the Present3-4
HISTORY 304 United States, 1877-19143-4
HISTORY 305 United States 1914-19453-4
HISTORY/​AFROAMER  321 Afro-American History Since 19003-4
HISTORY/​AFROAMER  322 Afro-American History to 19003-4
HISTORY 329 History of American Capitalism4
HISTORY 343 Colonial British North America3-4
HISTORY 344 The Age of the American Revolution, 1763-17893-4
HISTORY 345 Military History of the United States3-4
HISTORY/​GEN&WS  353 Women and Gender in the U.S. to 18703-4
HISTORY/​GEN&WS  354 Women and Gender in the U.S. Since 18703-4
HISTORY 355 Work, Freedom and Democracy in the Americas, 1491-the Present3
HISTORY/​AFROAMER  393 Slavery, Civil War, and Reconstruction, 1848-18773-4
HISTORY/​HIST SCI/​MED HIST  394 Science in America3
HISTORY 403 Immigration and Assimilation in American History3-4
HISTORY 408 American Labor History: 1900-Present3-4
HISTORY/​ED POL  412 History of American Education3
HISTORY/​JEWISH  416 Eastern European Jews in the United States, 1880s-1930s3-4
HISTORY/​CHICLA/​POLI SCI  422 Latino History and Politics3
HISTORY 427 The American Military Experience to 19023-4
HISTORY 428 The American Military Experience Since 18993-4
HISTORY 434 American Foreign Relations, 1901 to the Present3-4
HISTORY/​CHICLA  435 Colony, Nation, and Minority: The Puerto Ricans' World3
HISTORY/​LEGAL ST  459 Rule of Law: Philosophical and Historical Models3-4
HISTORY/​ENVIR ST/​GEOG  460 American Environmental History4
HISTORY/​CHICLA  461 The American West to18503-4
HISTORY/​CHICLA  462 The American West Since 18503-4
HISTORY/​ECON  465 The American Economy to 18653-4
HISTORY/​ECON  466 The American Economy Since 18653-4
HISTORY/​CHICLA  468 Popular Culture in the Multi-racial United States3-4
HISTORY/​ENVIR ST/​GEOG  469 The Making of the American Landscape4
HISTORY/​AMER IND  490 American Indian History3-4
HISTORY/​HIST SCI/​MED HIST  504 Society and Health Care in American History3
HISTORY/​JOURN  560 History of Mass Communication4
HISTORY/​L I S  569 History of American Librarianship3
HISTORY 607 The American Impact Abroad: The Historical Dimension3
HISTORY/​AFROAMER  628 History of the Civil Rights Movement in the United States3
History—European History
HISTORY/​CLASSICS  110 The Ancient Mediterranean4
HISTORY 111 Culture & Society in the Ancient Mediterranean3-4
HISTORY/​MEDIEVAL/​RELIG ST  112 The World of Late Antiquity (200-900 C.E.)4
HISTORY 115 Medieval Europe 410-15004
HISTORY 119 The Making of Modern Europe 1500-18154
HISTORY 120 Europe and the Modern World 1815 to the Present4
HISTORY 123 English History: England to 16883-4
HISTORY 124 British History: 1688 to the Present4
HISTORY 201 The Historian's Craft (topic must be approved)3-4
HISTORY/​RELIG ST  208 Western Intellectual and Religious History to 15003-4
HISTORY/​RELIG ST  209 Western Intellectual and Religious History since 15003-4
HISTORY/​RELIG ST  212 The History of Western Christianity to 17504
HISTORY/​MEDIEVAL  215 Life in the Middle Ages: An Inter-Departmental Course3-4
HISTORY 223 Explorations in European History (H)3-4
HISTORY 224 Explorations in European History (S)3
HISTORY/​GEOG/​POLI SCI/​SLAVIC  253 Russia: An Interdisciplinary Survey4
HISTORY/​GEOG/​POLI SCI/​SLAVIC  254 Eastern Europe: An Interdisciplinary Survey4
HISTORY 270 Eastern Europe since 19003-4
HISTORY 271 History Study Abroad: European History1-4
HISTORY 303 A History of Greek Civilization3-4
HISTORY 306 The United States Since 19453-4
HISTORY 307 A History of Rome3-4
HISTORY/​MEDIEVAL/​RELIG ST  309 The Crusades: Christianity and Islam3-4
HISTORY/​MEDIEVAL/​RELIG ST  312 The Medieval Church3-4
HISTORY/​MEDIEVAL  313 Introduction to Byzantine History and Civilization3-4
HISTORY/​MEDIEVAL  314 Problems in Byzantine History and Civilization3-4
HISTORY/​MEDIEVAL/​RELIG ST  318 Medieval Social and Intellectual History, 1200-14503-4
HISTORY 320 Early Modern France, 1500-17153-4
HISTORY/​HIST SCI  323 The Scientific Revolution: From Copernicus to Newton3
HISTORY/​ENVIR ST  328 Environmental History of Europe3
HISTORY 333 The Renaissance3-4
HISTORY/​RELIG ST  334 The Reformation3-4
HISTORY 348 France from Napoleon to the Great War, 1799-19143-4
HISTORY 349 Contemporary France, 1914 to the Present3-4
HISTORY 350 The First World War and the Shaping of Twentieth-Century Europe3-4
HISTORY 351 Seventeenth-Century Europe3-4
HISTORY 352 Eighteenth Century Europe3-4
HISTORY 357 The Second World War3-4
HISTORY 358 French Revolution and Napoleon3-4
HISTORY 359 History of Europe Since 19453-4
HISTORY 361 The Emergence of Mod Britain: England 1485-16603-4
HISTORY/​E A STDS  363 China and World War II in Asia3-4
HISTORY 367 Society and Ideas in Shakespeare's England3-4
HISTORY/​JEWISH/​MEDIEVAL/​RELIG ST  368 The Bible in the Middle Ages3
HISTORY/​JEWISH  373 Modern Political History of the Jews: 1655-19194
HISTORY/​JEWISH  374 Modern Political History of the Jews: Era of Mass Movements, 1870-19704
HISTORY/​GEN&WS  392 Women in History3-4
HISTORY 410 History of Germany, 1871 to the Present3-4
HISTORY 417 History of Russia3-4
HISTORY 418 History of Russia3-4
HISTORY 419 History of Soviet Russia3-4
HISTORY 420 Russian Social and Intellectual History3-4
HISTORY 424 The Soviet Union and the World, 1917-19913-4
HISTORY 425 History of Poland and the Baltic Area3-4
HISTORY/​SCAND ST  431 History of Scandinavia to 18153
HISTORY/​SCAND ST  432 History of Scandinavia Since 18153
HISTORY/​RELIG ST  437 Western Christianity from Augustine to Darwin4
HISTORY 467 Economic and Social History of Europe 1500-17503-4
HISTORY/​RELIG ST  470 Religious Thought in Modern Europe3-4
HISTORY 474 European Social History, 1830-19143-4
HISTORY 475 European Social History, 1914-Present3-4
HISTORY/​ED POL  478 Comparative History of Childhood and Adolescence3
HISTORY/​LEGAL ST  502 Law and Colonialism3
HISTORY/​HIST SCI/​MED HIST  507 Health, Disease and Healing I3-4
HISTORY/​HIST SCI/​MED HIST  508 Health, Disease and Healing II3-4
HISTORY/​RELIG ST  512 The Enlightenment and Its Critics3
HISTORY 514 European Cultural History Since 18703-4
HISTORY/​CURRIC/​JEWISH  515 Holocaust: History, Memory and Education3
HISTORY/​CLASSICS/​RELIG ST  517 Religions of the Ancient Mediterranean3
HISTORY/​JEWISH/​RELIG ST  529 Intellectual and Religious History of European Jewry, 1648-19394
HISTORY 540 Balkans and Middle East, 1700-1918: The Rise of National States3-4
HISTORY/​CLASSICS/​HIST SCI/​MED HIST/​S&A PHM  561 Greek and Roman Medicine and Pharmacy3
HISTORY/​SCAND ST  577 Contemporary Scandinavia: Politics and History3-4
History of Science
HIST SCI/​GEN&WS/​MED HIST  431 Childbirth in the United States3
Medical History and Bioethics
MED HIST/​HIST SCI  218 History of Twentieth Century American Medicine3
MED HIST/​GEN&WS/​HIST SCI  431 Childbirth in the United States3
Political Science
POLI SCI/​CHICLA/​HISTORY  422 Latino History and Politics3

Global Perspectives (minimum 3 credits)

Global perspectives courses include courses whose primary emphasis is on:

  • cultures whose origins lie outside of the western tradition, or
  • analyzing and interpreting cultural differences through the study of language, gender, race, ethnicity, religion, or class, or 
  • cultural pluralism within specific geographical areas.

The courses listed below count toward this requirement. Additional courses can be considered; students may consult with an advisor in Education Academic Services. 

African Languages & Literature
AFRICAN/​HISTORY  129 Africa on the Global Stage3-4
AFRICAN 201 Introduction to African Literature3
AFRICAN/​FOLKLORE  210 The African Storyteller3
AFRICAN 211 The African Autobiography3
AFRICAN 212 Introduction to African Popular Culture3-4
AFRICAN/​AFROAMER  220 HipHop, Youth Culture, and Politics in Senegal3
AFRICAN 230 Introduction to Yoruba Life and Culture3
AFRICAN 231 Introduction to Arabic Literary Culture3
AFRICAN 232 Introduction to Swahili Cultures3
AFRICAN/​AFROAMER  233 Global HipHop and Social Justice3
AFRICAN/​FOLKLORE  270 The Hero and Trickster in African Oral Traditions3
AFRICAN/​AFROAMER/​ANTHRO/​GEOG/​HISTORY/​POLI SCI/​SOC  277 Africa: An Introductory Survey4
AFRICAN/​AFROAMER/​HISTORY/​POLI SCI  297 African and African-American Linkages: An Introduction4
AFRICAN 300 African Literature in Translation3
AFRICAN/​LCA/​RELIG ST  370 Islam: Religion and Culture4
Afro-American Studies
AFROAMER/​AFRICAN  220 HipHop, Youth Culture, and Politics in Senegal3
AFROAMER/​AFRICAN  233 Global HipHop and Social Justice3
AFROAMER/​ART HIST  241 Introduction to African Art and Architecture3
AFROAMER/​ANTHRO/​C&E SOC/​GEOG/​HISTORY/​LACIS/​POLI SCI/​SOC/​SPANISH  260 Latin America: An Introduction3-4
AFROAMER/​AFRICAN/​ANTHRO/​GEOG/​HISTORY/​POLI SCI/​SOC  277 Africa: An Introductory Survey4
AFROAMER/​AFRICAN/​HISTORY/​POLI SCI  297 African and African-American Linkages: An Introduction4
AFROAMER/​GEN&WS  367 Art and Visual Culture: Women of the African Diaspora and Africa3
Agricultural and Applied Economics
A A E/​ENVIR ST  244 The Environment and the Global Economy3
A A E 319 The International Agricultural Economy3
A A E/​AGRONOMY/​INTER-AG/​NUTR SCI  350 World Hunger and Malnutrition3
A A E/​INTL ST  373 Globalization, Poverty and Development3
A A E/​INTL ST  374 The Growth and Development of Nations in the Global Economy3
A A E/​ECON  473 Economic Growth and Development in Southeast Asia3
Agronomy
AGRONOMY/​ENTOM/​NUTR SCI  203 Introduction to Global Health3
AGRONOMY/​A A E/​INTER-AG/​NUTR SCI  350 World Hunger and Malnutrition3
AGRONOMY 377 Cropping Systems of the Tropics3
Anthropology
ANTHRO 100 General Anthropology3
ANTHRO 102 Archaeology and the Prehistoric World3
ANTHRO 104 Cultural Anthropology and Human Diversity3
ANTHRO 105 Principles of Biological Anthropology3
ANTHRO/​FOLKLORE/​INTL ST/​LINGUIS  211 Global Language Issues4
ANTHRO 237 Cut 'n' Mix: Music, Race, and Culture in the Caribbean3
ANTHRO/​AFROAMER/​C&E SOC/​GEOG/​HISTORY/​LACIS/​POLI SCI/​SOC/​SPANISH  260 Latin America: An Introduction3-4
ANTHRO/​AFRICAN/​AFROAMER/​GEOG/​HISTORY/​POLI SCI/​SOC  277 Africa: An Introductory Survey4
ANTHRO 300 Cultural Anthropology: Theory and Ethnography3
ANTHRO/​AMER IND  314 Indians of North America3
ANTHRO 321 The Emergence of Human Culture3
ANTHRO 322 The Origins of Civilization3
ANTHRO 327 Peoples of the Andes Today3
ANTHRO 330 Topics in Ethnology (topic must be approved)3-4
ANTHRO 333 Prehistory of Africa3
ANTHRO 350 Political Anthropology3-4
ANTHRO 357 Introduction to the Anthropology of Japan3-4
ANTHRO 358 Anthropology of China3
ANTHRO 365 Medical Anthropology3
Art History
ART HIST 203 Survey of Asian Art3-4
ART HIST 205 Global Arts4
ART HIST/​AFROAMER  241 Introduction to African Art and Architecture3
ART HIST 305 History of Islamic Art and Architecture3
ART HIST 307 Early Chinese Art: From Antiquity to the Tenth Century3
ART HIST 308 Later Chinese Art: From the Tenth Century to the Present3
ART HIST 354 Cross-Cultural Arts Around the Atlantic Rim: 1800 to the Present3-4
ART HIST 371 Chinese Painting3-4
ART HIST 372 Arts of Japan3-4
ART HIST 375 Later Japanese Painting and Woodblock Prints3-4
ART HIST/​LCA  379 Cities of Asia3
ART HIST 411 Topics in Asian Art3-4
ART HIST 412 Topics in African and African Diaspora Art History3-4
ART HIST 413 Art and Architecture in the Age of the Caliphs3
ART HIST/​LCA  428 Visual Cultures of South Asia3
ART HIST 440 Art and Power in the Arab World3
ART HIST 475 Japanese Ceramics and Allied Arts3
ART HIST/​RELIG ST  478 Art and Religious Practice in Medieval Japan3
ART HIST 479 Art and History in Africa3-4
Community & Environmental Sociology
C&E SOC/​SOC  140 Introduction to Community and Environmental Sociology3
C&E SOC/​AFROAMER/​ANTHRO/​GEOG/​HISTORY/​LACIS/​POLI SCI/​SOC/​SPANISH  260 Latin America: An Introduction3-4
Comparative Literature
COMP LIT 379 Literature and Ethnic Experience (topic must be approved)3-4
Dance
DANCE 118 African Dance1
DANCE 165 World Dance Cultures: Traditional to Contemporary3
DANCE/​THEATRE  218 African Dance Performance2
DANCE/​AFROAMER/​MUSIC  318 Cultural Cross Currents: West African Dance/Music in the Americas3
DANCE/​FOLKLORE/​THEATRE  321 Javanese Performance2
East Asian Area Studies
E A STDS/​HISTORY  103 Introduction to East Asian History: China3-4
E A STDS/​HISTORY  104 Introduction to East Asian History: Japan3-4
E A STDS/​HISTORY/​POLI SCI  255 Introduction to East Asian Civilizations3-4
E A STDS/​ASIAN AM/​HISTORY  276 Chinese Migrations since 15003-4
E A STDS/​E ASIAN  300 Humanities Topics in East Asian Studies (topic must be approved)1-3
E A STDS 301 Social Studies Topics in East Asian Studies (topic must be approved)1-3
E A STDS/​HISTORY  337 Social and Intellectual History of China, 589 AD-19193-4
E A STDS/​HISTORY  341 History of Modern China, 1800-19493-4
E A STDS/​HISTORY  342 History of the Peoples Republic of China, 1949 to the Present3-4
E A STDS/​HISTORY  363 China and World War II in Asia3-4
E A STDS/​HISTORY  454 Samurai: History and Image3-4
E A STDS/​HISTORY  456 Pearl Harbor & Hiroshima: Japan, the US & The Crisis in Asia3-4
East Asian Languages & Literature
E ASIAN/​LCA/​RELIG ST  235 Genres of Asian Religious Writing3
E ASIAN 253 Introduction to Japanese Culture and Civilization3
E ASIAN/​HISTORY/​RELIG ST  267 Asian Religions in Global Perspective3
E ASIAN/​KINES  277 Kendo: Integration of Martial Arts and Liberal Arts2
E ASIAN/​E A STDS  300 Humanities Topics in East Asian Studies1-3
E ASIAN/​HISTORY/​LCA/​RELIG ST  308 Introduction to Buddhism3-4
E ASIAN/​RELIG ST  350 Introduction to Taoism3-4
E ASIAN 351 Survey of Chinese Literature3
E ASIAN 352 Survey of Chinese Literature3
E ASIAN 353 Survey of Japanese Literature3
E ASIAN 354 Survey of Japanese Literature3
E ASIAN 356 Chinese Painting3-4
E ASIAN 361 Masterworks of Japanese Literature: The Tale of Genji3
E ASIAN/​RELIG ST  363 Introduction to Confucianism3
E ASIAN 367 Japanese Poetic Tradition3-4
E ASIAN 371 Topics in Chinese Literature2-3
E ASIAN 376 Manga.3
E ASIAN 378 Anime3
E ASIAN/​LCA/​RELIG ST  466 Buddhist Thought3
Environmental Studies
ENVIR ST/​GEOG  139 Living in the Global Environment: An Introduction to People-Environment Geography3-4
ENVIR ST/​A A E  244 The Environment and the Global Economy3
ENVIR ST/​GEOG  309 People, Land and Food: Comparative Study of Agriculture Systems3
ENVIR ST/​GEOG  339 Environmental Conservation4
ENVIR ST/​HIST SCI/​LCA/​RELIG ST  356 Islam, Science & Technology, and the Environment3-4
ENVIR ST/​M&ENVTOX/​PL PATH  368 Environmental Law, Toxic Substances, and Conservation2
Folklore
FOLKLORE 100 Introduction to Folklore3
FOLKLORE/​MUSIC  103 Introduction to Music Cultures of the World2
FOLKLORE/​AFRICAN  210 The African Storyteller3
FOLKLORE/​ANTHRO/​INTL ST/​LINGUIS  211 Global Language Issues4
FOLKLORE/​AFRICAN  270 The Hero and Trickster in African Oral Traditions3
FOLKLORE/​LCA  279 Introduction to Turkish Folk Literature3
FOLKLORE/​DANCE/​THEATRE  321 Javanese Performance2
FOLKLORE/​RELIG ST  352 Shamanism3
FOLKLORE/​LCA  374 Indian Folklore3
Gender and Women's Studies
GEN&WS 102 Gender, Women, and Society in Global Perspective3
GEN&WS/​HISTORY  134 Women and Gender in World History3-4
GEN&WS/​AFROAMER  367 Art and Visual Culture: Women of the African Diaspora and Africa3
GEN&WS 427 Global Feminisms3
GEN&WS/​PORTUG  450 Brazillian Women Writers3
Geography
GEOG 101 Introduction to Human Geography4
GEOG/​ENVIR ST  139 Living in the Global Environment: An Introduction to People-Environment Geography3-4
GEOG/​HISTORY/​LCA/​POLI SCI/​SOC  244 Introduction to Southeast Asia: Vietnam to the Philippines4
GEOG/​HISTORY/​LCA/​POLI SCI/​SOC  252 The Civilizations of India-Modern Period4
GEOG/​AFROAMER/​ANTHRO/​C&E SOC/​HISTORY/​LACIS/​POLI SCI/​SOC/​SPANISH  260 Latin America: An Introduction3-4
GEOG/​AFRICAN/​AFROAMER/​ANTHRO/​HISTORY/​POLI SCI/​SOC  277 Africa: An Introductory Survey4
GEOG/​ENVIR ST  309 People, Land and Food: Comparative Study of Agriculture Systems3
GEOG/​ENVIR ST  339 Environmental Conservation4
GEOG 340 World Regions in Global Context3
GEOG 348 Latin America4
GEOG 355 Africa, South of the Sahara3
GEOG 358 Human Geography of Southeast Asia3
History
HISTORY/​E A STDS  103 Introduction to East Asian History: China3-4
HISTORY/​E A STDS  104 Introduction to East Asian History: Japan3-4
HISTORY 105 Introduction to the History of Africa3-4
HISTORY 108 Introduction to East Asian History - Korea3-4
HISTORY/​AFRICAN  129 Africa on the Global Stage3-4
HISTORY 130 An Introduction to World History3-4
HISTORY/​GEN&WS  134 Women and Gender in World History3-4
HISTORY 139 The Middle East in the 20th Century3-4
HISTORY 142 History of South Asia to the Present3-4
HISTORY/​LCA  144 Traveling the World: South Asians in Diaspora4
HISTORY 201 The Historian's Craft (topic must be approved)3-4
HISTORY/​LCA/​RELIG ST  205 The Making of the Islamic World: The Middle East, 500-15003-4
HISTORY 225 Explorations in Third World History (H)3-4
HISTORY 228 Explorations in Transnational/Comparative History (Social Science) (topic must be approved)3
HISTORY 229 Explorations in Transnational/Comparative History (Humanities) (topic must be approved)3
HISTORY 241 Latin America from 1780 to 19404
HISTORY 242 Modern Latin America, 1898 to the Present4
HISTORY/​GEOG/​LCA/​POLI SCI/​SOC  244 Introduction to Southeast Asia: Vietnam to the Philippines4
HISTORY/​CHICLA/​GEN&WS  245 Chicana and Latina History3
HISTORY/​ASIAN AM/​LCA  246 Southeast Asian Refugees of the "Cold" War4
HISTORY/​GEOG/​LCA/​POLI SCI/​SOC  252 The Civilizations of India-Modern Period4
HISTORY/​E A STDS/​POLI SCI  255 Introduction to East Asian Civilizations3-4
HISTORY/​AFROAMER/​ANTHRO/​C&E SOC/​GEOG/​LACIS/​POLI SCI/​SOC/​SPANISH  260 Latin America: An Introduction3-4
HISTORY/​LCA  265 An Introduction to Central Asia: From the Silk Route to Afghanistan3
HISTORY/​E ASIAN/​RELIG ST  267 Asian Religions in Global Perspective3
HISTORY 273 History Study Abroad: Non-Western History1-4
HISTORY/​ASIAN AM/​E A STDS  276 Chinese Migrations since 15003-4
HISTORY/​AFRICAN/​AFROAMER/​ANTHRO/​GEOG/​POLI SCI/​SOC  277 Africa: An Introductory Survey4
HISTORY 278 Africans in the Americas, 1492-18083-4
HISTORY 279 Afro-Atlantic History, 1808-Present3-4
HISTORY/​AFRICAN/​AFROAMER/​POLI SCI  297 African and African-American Linkages: An Introduction4
HISTORY/​E ASIAN/​LCA/​RELIG ST  308 Introduction to Buddhism3-4
HISTORY/​MEDIEVAL/​RELIG ST  309 The Crusades: Christianity and Islam3-4
HISTORY 319 The Vietnam Wars3-4
HISTORY 335 Korean History, 1945 to present3-4
HISTORY 336 Chinese Economic and Business History: From Silk to iPhones3-4
HISTORY/​E A STDS  337 Social and Intellectual History of China, 589 AD-19193-4
HISTORY/​E A STDS  341 History of Modern China, 1800-19493-4
HISTORY/​E A STDS  342 History of the Peoples Republic of China, 1949 to the Present3-4
HISTORY/​AFROAMER  347 The Caribbean and its Diasporas3
HISTORY/​E A STDS  363 China and World War II in Asia3-4
HISTORY 377 History of Africa, 1500 to 18703-4
HISTORY 378 History of Africa Since 18703-4
HISTORY/​RELIG ST  379 Islam in Iran3
HISTORY/​CHICLA/​POLI SCI  422 Latino History and Politics3
HISTORY/​CHICLA  435 Colony, Nation, and Minority: The Puerto Ricans' World3
HISTORY/​LCA/​RELIG ST  438 Buddhism and Society in Southeast Asian History3-4
HISTORY/​RELIG ST  439 Islamic History From the Origin of Islam to the Ottoman Empire3-4
HISTORY 441 Revolution and Conflict in Modern Latin America3-4
HISTORY 444 History of East Africa3-4
HISTORY 445 History of Equatorial Africa3-4
HISTORY/​LCA  450 Making of Modern South Asia3-4
HISTORY/​E A STDS  454 Samurai: History and Image3-4
HISTORY/​E A STDS  456 Pearl Harbor & Hiroshima: Japan, the US & The Crisis in Asia3-4
HISTORY/​LCA  457 History of Southeast Asia to 18003-4
HISTORY/​LCA  458 History of Southeast Asia Since 18003-4
HISTORY 463 Topics in South Asian History3
HISTORY/​GEN&WS/​LCA  472 Women in Turkish Society3
HISTORY 533 Multi-Racial Societies in Latin America3-4
HISTORY 540 Balkans and Middle East, 1700-1918: The Rise of National States3-4
HISTORY 555 History of Brazil3-4
HISTORY/​HIST SCI/​MED HIST  564 Disease, Medicine and Public Health in the History of Latin America and the Caribbean3
Integrated Liberal Studies
ILS 209 Introduction to Global Cultures3
Inter-AG
INTER-AG/​A A E/​AGRONOMY/​NUTR SCI  350 World Hunger and Malnutrition3
International Business
INTL BUS 200 International Business3
International Studies
INTL ST 101 Introduction to International Studies3-4
INTL ST 310 International Learning Community Seminar (specific topic must be approved)1-3
INTL ST/​ED POL  335 Globalization and Education3
INTL ST/​A A E  373 Globalization, Poverty and Development3
INTL ST/​A A E  374 The Growth and Development of Nations in the Global Economy3
Jewish Studies
JEWISH/​RELIG ST  377 Jewish Cultural History (in English)4
Kinesiology
KINES/​E ASIAN  277 Kendo: Integration of Martial Arts and Liberal Arts2
Languages and Cultures of Asia
LCA 100 Introduction to Cultures of Asia3
LCA 101 Introduction to Literatures of Asia3
LCA/​HISTORY/​RELIG ST  205 The Making of the Islamic World: The Middle East, 500-15003-4
LCA/​HISTORY/​RELIG ST  205 The Making of the Islamic World: The Middle East, 500-15003-4
LCA/​RELIG ST  206 Introduction to the Qur'an4
LCA/​E ASIAN/​RELIG ST  235 Genres of Asian Religious Writing3
LCA/​GEOG/​HISTORY/​POLI SCI/​SOC  244 Introduction to Southeast Asia: Vietnam to the Philippines4
LCA/​ASIAN AM/​HISTORY  246 Southeast Asian Refugees of the "Cold" War4
LCA/​GEOG/​HISTORY/​POLI SCI/​SOC  252 The Civilizations of India-Modern Period4
LCA/​HISTORY  265 An Introduction to Central Asia: From the Silk Route to Afghanistan3
LCA 266 Introduction to the Middle East3
LCA/​RELIG ST  274 Religion in South Asia3
LCA/​FOLKLORE  279 Introduction to Turkish Folk Literature3
LCA 300 Topics in Languages and Cultures of Asia3
LCA/​E ASIAN/​HISTORY/​RELIG ST  308 Introduction to Buddhism3-4
LCA 311 Modern Indian Literatures3
LCA 314 Literatures of Central Asia3
LCA/​POLI SCI  326 Politics of South Asia3-4
LCA/​LITTRANS/​THEATRE  348 In Translation: Modern Indian Theatre3
LCA/​RELIG ST  355 Hinduism4
LCA/​ENVIR ST/​HIST SCI/​RELIG ST  356 Islam, Science & Technology, and the Environment3-4
LCA/​RELIG ST  357 Literatures of Muslim Societies3
LCA 361 Survey of Indonesian Cultures3
LCA/​RELIG ST  367 Jainism: Religion of Non-Violence3
LCA/​AFRICAN/​RELIG ST  370 Islam: Religion and Culture4
LCA/​FOLKLORE  374 Indian Folklore3
LCA/​ART HIST  379 Cities of Asia3
LCA 401 Modern Indonesian Literature3
LCA/​RELIG ST  402 Thought of Gandhi3
LCA 403 Southeast Asian Literature3
LCA 404 Southeast Asian Literature3
LCA/​RELIG ST  421 A Survey of Tibetan Buddhism3
LCA/​ART HIST  428 Visual Cultures of South Asia3
LCA/​HISTORY/​RELIG ST  438 Buddhism and Society in Southeast Asian History3-4
LCA 441 Language and Society in Southeast Asia3
LCA/​RELIG ST  444 Introduction to Sufism (Islamic Mysticism)3
LCA/​HISTORY  450 Making of Modern South Asia3-4
LCA/​HISTORY  457 History of Southeast Asia to 18003-4
LCA/​HISTORY  458 History of Southeast Asia Since 18003-4
LCA/​E ASIAN/​RELIG ST  466 Buddhist Thought3
Literature in Translation
LITTRANS 211 Modern Indian Literatures in Traslation3
LITTRANS 214 Literatures of Central Asia in Translation3
LITTRANS 226 Introduction to Luso-Afro-Brazilian Literature3
LITTRANS 231 Manga3
LITTRANS 232 Anime3
LITTRANS/​RELIG ST  257 Literatures of Muslim Societies in Translation3
LITTRANS 261 Survey of Chinese Literature in Translation3
LITTRANS 262 Survey of Chinese Literature in Translation3
LITTRANS 263 Survey of Japanese Literature in Translation3
LITTRANS 264 Survey of Japanese Literature in Translation3
LITTRANS 301 Modern Indonesian Literature in Translation3
LITTRANS 303 Southeast Asian Literature in Translation3
LITTRANS 304 Southeast Asian Literature in Translation3
LITTRANS/​LCA/​THEATRE  348 In Translation: Modern Indian Theatre3
LITTRANS 368 Modern Japanese Fiction3
LITTRANS 372 Classical Japanese Prose in Translation3
LITTRANS 373 Topics in Japanese Literature3
LITTRANS 374 Topics in Korean Literature (specific topic must be approved)3
Medical History and Bioethics
MED HIST/​ENVIR ST  213 Global Environmental Health: An Interdisciplinary Introduction3
Medieval Studies
MEDIEVAL/​HISTORY/​RELIG ST  309 The Crusades: Christianity and Islam3-4
Music
MUSIC/​FOLKLORE  103 Introduction to Music Cultures of the World2
MUSIC 361 Non-Western Music Performance-Study Groups1
Nutritional Sciences
NUTR SCI/​AGRONOMY/​ENTOM  203 Introduction to Global Health3
NUTR SCI/​A A E/​AGRONOMY/​INTER-AG  350 World Hunger and Malnutrition3
Political Science
POLI SCI 120 Politics Around the World4
POLI SCI 182 Politics Around the World (Honors)3
POLI SCI/​CHICLA  231 Politics in Multi-Cultural Societies3-4
POLI SCI/​GEOG/​HISTORY/​LCA/​SOC  244 Introduction to Southeast Asia: Vietnam to the Philippines4
POLI SCI/​GEOG/​HISTORY/​LCA/​SOC  252 The Civilizations of India-Modern Period4
POLI SCI/​E A STDS/​HISTORY  255 Introduction to East Asian Civilizations3-4
POLI SCI/​AFROAMER/​ANTHRO/​C&E SOC/​GEOG/​HISTORY/​LACIS/​SOC/​SPANISH  260 Latin America: An Introduction3-4
POLI SCI/​AFRICAN/​AFROAMER/​ANTHRO/​GEOG/​HISTORY/​SOC  277 Africa: An Introductory Survey4
POLI SCI/​AFRICAN/​AFROAMER/​HISTORY  297 African and African-American Linkages: An Introduction4
POLI SCI 321 Latin-American Politics3-4
POLI SCI 322 Politics of Southeast Asia3-4
POLI SCI 324 Political Power in Contemporary China3-4
POLI SCI/​INTL ST  325 Social Movements and Revolutions in Latin America3-4
POLI SCI/​LCA  326 Politics of South Asia3-4
POLI SCI/​INTL ST  327 Indian Politics in Comparative Perspective3
POLI SCI 329 African Politics3-4
POLI SCI 333 International Politics of the Middle East3-4
POLI SCI 346 China in World Politics3-4
POLI SCI 353 The Third World in the International System3-4
Population Health
POP HLTH 370 Introduction to Public Health: Local to Global Perspectives3
Religious Studies
RELIG ST/​HISTORY/​LCA  205 The Making of the Islamic World: The Middle East, 500-15003-4
RELIG ST/​LCA  206 Introduction to the Qur'an4
RELIG ST/​E ASIAN/​LCA  235 Genres of Asian Religious Writing3
RELIG ST/​E ASIAN/​HISTORY  267 Asian Religions in Global Perspective3
RELIG ST/​LCA  274 Religion in South Asia3
RELIG ST/​E ASIAN/​HISTORY/​LCA  308 Introduction to Buddhism3-4
RELIG ST/​HISTORY/​MEDIEVAL  309 The Crusades: Christianity and Islam3-4
RELIG ST/​E ASIAN  350 Introduction to Taoism3-4
RELIG ST/​FOLKLORE  352 Shamanism3
RELIG ST/​LCA  355 Hinduism4
RELIG ST/​ENVIR ST/​HIST SCI/​LCA  356 Islam, Science & Technology, and the Environment3-4
RELIG ST/​LCA  357 Literatures of Muslim Societies3
RELIG ST/​E ASIAN  363 Introduction to Confucianism3
RELIG ST/​LCA  367 Jainism: Religion of Non-Violence3
RELIG ST/​AFRICAN/​LCA  370 Islam: Religion and Culture4
RELIG ST/​JEWISH  377 Jewish Cultural History (in English)4
RELIG ST/​HISTORY  379 Islam in Iran3
RELIG ST 400 Topics in Religious Studies - Humanities (topic must be approved)3-4
RELIG ST 401 Topics in Religious Studies - Social Studies (topic must be approved)3-4
RELIG ST/​LCA  402 Thought of Gandhi3
RELIG ST/​LCA  421 A Survey of Tibetan Buddhism3
RELIG ST/​HISTORY/​LCA  438 Buddhism and Society in Southeast Asian History3-4
RELIG ST/​HISTORY  439 Islamic History From the Origin of Islam to the Ottoman Empire3-4
RELIG ST/​E ASIAN/​LCA  466 Buddhist Thought3
Sociology
SOC/​C&E SOC  140 Introduction to Community and Environmental Sociology3
SOC 170 Population Problems3-4
SOC/​C&E SOC  222 Food, Culture, and Society3
SOC 225 Contemporary Chinese Society3
SOC/​GEOG/​HISTORY/​LCA/​POLI SCI  244 Introduction to Southeast Asia: Vietnam to the Philippines4
SOC/​C&E SOC/​F&W ECOL  248 Environment, Natural Resources, and Society3
SOC/​GEOG/​HISTORY/​LCA/​POLI SCI  252 The Civilizations of India-Modern Period4
SOC/​AFROAMER/​ANTHRO/​C&E SOC/​GEOG/​HISTORY/​LACIS/​POLI SCI/​SPANISH  260 Latin America: An Introduction3-4
SOC/​AFRICAN/​AFROAMER/​ANTHRO/​GEOG/​HISTORY/​POLI SCI  277 Africa: An Introductory Survey4
SOC/​C&E SOC/​POP HLTH  380 Contemporary Population Problems for Honors3
Spanish
SPANISH 223 Introduction to Hispanic Cultures3
SPANISH/​AFROAMER/​ANTHRO/​C&E SOC/​GEOG/​HISTORY/​LACIS/​POLI SCI/​SOC  260 Latin America: An Introduction3-4
Theatre
THEATRE/​DANCE/​FOLKLORE  321 Javanese Performance2
THEATRE/​LCA/​LITTRANS  348 In Translation: Modern Indian Theatre3
THEATRE 351 Fundamentals of Asian Stage Discipline3

LIBERAL STUDIES ELECTIVES

Complete additional liberal studies coursework as needed to reach the required 40 Liberal Studies credits.

IMPORTANT NOTES REGARDING THE  LIBERAL STUDIES REQUIREMENTS

  • Completion of the Liberal Studies requirements is not a prerequisite to professional program application or admission.
  • For the most part, courses listed in School of Education departments may not be used to satisfy the Liberal Studies requirements. School of Education departments include Art, Art Education, Counseling Psychology, Curriculum and Instruction, Dance, Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis, Educational Policy Studies, Educational Psychology, Kinesiology, Rehabilitation Psychology and Special Education, and Theatre and Drama.
    • For example, KINES 100 Exercise, Nutrition, and Health, cannot count toward the Liberal Studies requirement even though it is a Biological Science course. ED PSYCH 320 Human Development in Infancy and Childhood cannot count toward Liberal Studies even though it is a Social Science course.
    • Exceptions include some courses that are cross-listed in departments outside the School of Education such as ED POL/​HISTORY  412 History of American Education/HISTORY/​ED POL  412 History of American Education. Art and Dance department courses count toward the Humanities requirement.
  • Courses that transfer to UW–Madison as departmental electives (e.g., POLI SCI X10) might meet specific Liberal Studies requirements. Students may consult with an advisor in Education Academic Services to discuss transfer electives that appear to meet specific course requirements.
  • While one course may cover two requirements, students must still complete both the 40-credit total and the 9-credit minimum requirements in Humanities, Social Studies (Social Science), and Science.
    • For example, THEATRE/​ENGL  120 Introduction to Theatre and Dramatic Literature, a Literature course also on the Fine Arts list, may be used to meet both the specific Fine Arts and Literature requirements of the Humanities area, but a total of 9 credits of Humanities are still required.
  • Courses in other schools/colleges (excluding the School of Education) may count as Liberal Studies if they have an L&S Credit Type designation of C and/or assigned a level or breadth descriptor.
  • No Liberal Studies coursework may be taken on a Pass/Fail basis.

GUIDELINES FOR SPECIFIC PROGRAM AREAS

Teacher Education programs

All teacher education students, except those in music education or art education, may apply any appropriate coursework from the major or minor toward the Liberal Studies requirements. Students in music and art education are restricted in this overlap. For students in music education, no more than 6 credits of music history and no more than 4 art and dance credits may count toward the 40 total credits. Music history courses (e.g., MUSIC 211 Survey of the History of Western MusicMUSIC 212 Survey of the History of Western Music) may not be used to meet the U.S./ European History requirement. Art education students may apply all of the aesthetics credits (usually 14) toward the Liberal Studies requirements, but not courses taken to meet the studio requirements.

Elementary education students can use a Science course or Social Studies course from the Environmental Education course list to meet both the Liberal Studies and Environmental Education requirements.

Art (BFA and BS)

In general, students may not satisfy Liberal Studies requirements with courses meeting studio or aesthetics requirements. However, Art–BFA candidates may apply 4 aesthetics elective credits toward the Humanities credits.

Athletic Training, Kinesiology–Exercise and Movement Science, and Physical Education

Athletic training, kinesiology–exercise and movement science, and physical education students will meet the Science requirement by completing their required science courses—e.g., chemistry and physics.

Communication Sciences and Disorders

Communication sciences and disorders students should consult both the Liberal Studies requirements and the communication sciences and disorders program requirements, particularly the "related courses" section, when selecting Liberal Studies coursework. Courses may count in both places.

Dance (BFA & BS)

Dance and Dance–BFA students must complete ANATOMY/​KINES  329 Human Anatomy-Kinesiology, which will meet both a Science requirement and the Science Laboratory requirement. In general, Liberal Studies requirements cannot be met with courses taken to meet other program requirements.

Rehabilitation Psychology

In general, rehabilitation psychology students may not satisfy Liberal Studies requirements with courses taken to meet the Professional Education and Background requirements. Courses taken to meet the Rehabilitation Psychology Professional Background or Specialization requirements cannot also count toward the 40 Liberal Studies credits. However, if a course is taken to meet any of the three Cultural/Historical Studies requirements, the course content can be used to meet both requirements, but the credits will only count toward the Professional Education or Specialization requirements.

Theatre and Drama

Theatre and drama students can apply major coursework toward the Liberal Studies requirements.

Scholarships/TEACH Grants

Scholarships

The generosity of alumni and friends has enabled the School of Education to distribute more than $500,000 in scholarships and awards annually to deserving undergraduate students. Half of these are awarded through a school-wide competitive process; the other half are awarded by individual departments and programs. The list of School of Education undergraduate scholarships and honors is available at Scholarships@UW–Madison.

School of Education scholarships open to applicants in early February and close at the end of March. Scholarship decisions are made in early June and then communicated to applicants in July. The selection criteria for specific scholarships and awards vary and may include academic performance, excellence in a specific field or area, potential as a prospective teacher, leadership ability, personal attributes (such as returning adult status or home county), and financial need. All scholarship and award recipients must be in good academic standing in the School of Education.

Schoolwide scholarships for undergraduates are organized into two categories. All-School scholarships are open to any student in the School of Education. Teacher Education scholarships are designated for students seeking teacher certification; most of these are awarded to students already admitted to professional teacher education programs. Generous donors have also made it possible to offer many School-wide scholarships to recruit and retain underrepresented students interested in health, education and the arts.

While many scholarships are awarded, the number of scholarships is substantially smaller than the number of eligible students.

TEACH Grants

Students willing to teach in "high-need" teaching fields can receive TEACH grants of up to $4,000 per year for a total of $16,000 over their undergraduate academic career. Officially-designated “high need fields” include Master of Science with Secondary Teaching & ESL Certification, Bilingual Education; Communication Sciences and Disorders; English as a Second Language; Mathematics; Music; Reading Specialist; Science certification areas; Special Education; World Language Education certification areas, and any other fields documented as "high-need" by the federal government and/or state or local education agency (LEA). Elementary Education students completing the Early Childhood/ESL, Middle Childhood-Early Adolescence/ESL or the Middle Childhood-Early Adolescence/Special Education program options are also eligible for a TEACH Grant.

Students receiving TEACH grants must complete a service obligation of four years of teaching their high-need subject in a designated low-income school within their first eight years of teaching. "Low-income schools" are defined as public or private nonprofit elementary or secondary schools eligible for assistance under Title I of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act. In Wisconsin over a thousand schools are designated as "low income."

TEACH grant applicants must attain certain academic eligibility criteria. For example, candidates must have scored minimally above the 75th percentile on a nationally normed admissions test or have earned a 3.25 minimum cumulative grade point average. TEACH grants are not need-based, so students may receive them without regard to financial background. Grant recipients must have completed a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) to be eligible.

Students should indicate their interest in the TEACH Grant program via their FAFSA and by completing the program application.

Undergraduate Advising and Academic Dean's Office - Education Academic Services (EAS)

139 Education Building, 1000 Bascom Mall; 608-262-1651
www.education.wisc.edu/soe/academics/undergraduate-students/academic-advising

Education Academic Services (EAS) is the undergraduate dean's office for students in the School of Education. Staff members interpret school regulations, policies, and program requirements; take exceptions around requirements and deadlines; advise current and prospective students; monitor students having academic difficulties; coordinate field placements; facilitate the program admissions process; and maintain the official files of students in the school.

Students should meet with an advisor during their first semester on campus (if not before) and should consider meeting with an advisor at least once a semester. This is particularly important during the freshman and sophomore years. Appointments may be arranged by calling or visiting the office. Current materials on undergraduate program admission and graduation requirements are available on this site.

Students will find that questions can be answered by and guidance sought from EAS advisors. EAS staff members consult with and refer students to faculty members and department advisors. Once a student is admitted to a professional program within the School of Education, he or she will also be assigned a faculty or staff advisor. Advising then becomes a partnership, with EAS advisors continuing to help students with course selection, degree progress monitoring, academic difficulties, and interpretation of policies and procedures.

Program advisors help students select and plan a program of study in the major, negotiate issues within the department, and, in the case of certification programs, follow the students' progress through their professional courses. These divisions are flexible, and students are encouraged to consult with all advisors who can help with a situation or answer a question.

Student Diversity Services

105 Education Building, 1000 Bascom Mall, 608-262-8427 or 608-262-1651
www.education.wisc.edu/sdp

The UW–Madison School of Education is committed to promoting equity and increasing diversity in its programs. Student Diversity Programs support and promote a welcoming, culturally responsive and supportive School community to help fulfill the School’s vision to be at the forefront of preparing students from underrepresented backgrounds to enter and excel in higher education.

Student Diversity Programs (SDP) houses programs that serve students from K–12 to those in graduate school. These programs include:

  • College Access Program (CAP): A three-week summer residential pre-college program with an emphasis on majors in the School of Education. CAP prepares future first-generation college students or students from economically disadvantaged backgrounds for college admission, majors, and future careers.
  • The Office of Undergraduate Recruitment and Retention (OURR): OURR staff work collaboratively with Education Academic Services and campus and community partners to support underrepresented students interested in majors in the School of Education. OURR staff perform outreach, recruitment and advising on behalf of the School. OURR staff also support current students with their personal and professional growth, their transition from high school to college, and financial aid, and career exploration.  OURR works to build a network of students and graduates who may strengthen, transform, and lead their communities through education, service, and other contributions.
  • American Indian Curriculum Services: An office that provides assistance to teacher education programs, faculty, staff, and students, as well as in-service teachers and regional schools, for the teaching and learning of the history, cultures, and tribal sovereignty of the American Indian Nations of Wisconsin in PK–16 education.
  • Summer Education Research Program (SERP): A ten-week residential summer research program for undergraduate students interested in pursuing graduate degrees in teh School of Education. Program participants conduct research projects under the supervision of faculty mentors, learn how to prepare themselves for graduate school, and present their final projects to faculty members, peers, and the university community.
  • Education Graduate Research Scholars (Ed–GRS): A graduate fellowship program and research community which provides not only funding to graduate students from underrepresented backgrounds, but also professional development opportunities and opportunities to connect with faculty members and peers throughout the School. 

Students are invited to visit SDP at 105 Education Building—stop in or call one of the numbers listed above to set up an appointment.

School of Education Career Center

L107 Education Building, 1000 Bascom Mall, 608-262-1755
http://careercenter.education.wisc.edu/

Need assistance with any of the following? 

  • Exploring career options linked to School of Education majors
  • Seeking a major that fits you and helps you reach your career goals
  • Researching graduate schools and preparing application materials
  • Beginning your job search and not sure where to start
  • Want assistance with your résumé, cover letter, or interviewing skills
  • Want to network and connect with potential employers

The Career Center provides resources and individual consultations to assist you in reaching your career goals.  A plethora of resources can be found on the Career Center website

  • Explore career possibilities for specific majors in the Investigate Career Options.  This section of the website provides tools for clarifying your personal criteria for success, identifying specific career options linked to majors and identifying steps for career/major selection, and includes strategies for making the most of your academic and student experience.
  • Confirm your decisions.  Gain hands-on experience in the career field you are pursuing.  Assess the perceptions of your career and major options for accuracy and develop professional and soft skills.  The Test Drive and Confirm Career Choice website section provides strategies for gaining real-world experience.
  • Prepare to gain entry into the next phase of your career.  Learn about graduate school requirements and the application process.  Develop your promotional materials for employers and graduate schools and obtain feedback and suggestions for enhancing them.  Obtain materials to support your candidacy.  The Prepare and Connect section provides offers additional details.
  • Implement your plans for your future.  Attend recruiting events.  Apply for graduate school acceptance or for job opportunities. Practice your interviewing skills.  Interview. Negotiate job and graduate school offers.

Personalized career assistance is available through individual appointments with consultants in the Career Center. Schedule an appointment here.

Informational workshops and career-related events are conducted each semester. 

The Career Center also coordinates teacher recruitment fairs each fall and spring semester and collaborates with career centers across campus to provide campus-wide career fairs at the beginning of each semesters. 

Study Abroad

About 25% of undergraduates make study abroad an integral part of their UW–Madison experience.

International Academic Programs (IAP) at UW–Madison offers over 200 study abroad options in about 60 countries on 6 continents.  In addition to taking the opportunity to learn new languages, understand new cultures and see the world, UW–Madison students study abroad to complement their on-campus academic goals, strengthen their professional potential and enrich their personal lives.

Students of all academic levels and majors study abroad. While many programs include language training—from the basics to full language immersion—most IAP programs have no language requirement and include courses taught in English.

All courses taken abroad through IAP count as “in-residence” credit, just like taking courses on campus at UW–Madison, so students advance towards their degrees while abroad. And study abroad isn’t limited to classroom experience. Many students also complete internships, do research, fieldwork and service learning.

In addition to resources on health, safety, academic planning and other aspects, UW–Madison students receive the information and guidance they need to plan a study abroad experiences that fits their budgets. Many study abroad programs cost the about the same or less than studying on campus, and student financial aid can be applied in most cases. 

While IAP offers programs to students of all majors, including to students in the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences in collaboration with the CALS International Programs office, the College of Engineering and the School of Business also offer programs tailored specifically to the needs of their students. All of these program options are listed at studyabroad.wisc.edu/explore.

For more information on study abroad at UW–Madison, see Study Abroad or call 608-265-6329.

Undergraduate Research Scholars Program

The Undergraduate Research Scholars program (URS) is dedicated to enhancing the academic experience of UW–Madison students by providing first and second year undergraduates with opportunities to earn credit for participating in the research and creative work with UW–Madison faculty and staff. The program has been designed to include partnerships between students and mentors, seminars on research-relevant issues, and practice in research/artistic presentations. The many benefits of the program are found in the fluid interaction between these activities. Please refer to Undergraduate Research Scholars for more information.

MERIT (Media, Education Resources, and Information Technology)

301 Teacher Education Building, 608-263-4750
merit.education.wisc.edu

MERIT offers information and technology services to the School of Education and UW–Madison community partners. MERIT is designed as a collaborative and comprehensive cluster of service and support for the School of Education, the UW–Madison and beyond. Staff play an active role in the design and implementation of programs which connect the K-12 community to UW–Madison.

Some of our services include evaluation and selection of tools for delivery of content, instructional design and consulting for development of online learning, library services and collections to support practicing teachers (including edTPA and equipment loan), workshops and instructional support aimed at adoption of new tools, media development, web hosting, and web design.

For a much deeper look at our service descriptions, please visit:  http://meritservices.education.wisc.edu/Category

Cooperative Children's Book Center (CCBC)

401 Teacher Education, 608-263-3720
ccbcinfo@education.wisc.edu, ccbc.education.wisc.edu/

The CCBC is a library of the School of Education that provides Education students, faculty, and staff with a noncirculating collection of children's and adolescent literature. The CCBC also serves other adults on campus and across the state who are interested in literature for the young, including Wisconsin teachers and school and public librarians.

This nationally unique library is the primary resource on campus and elsewhere for contemporary books published for children and young adults from preschool through high school ages. CCBC resources include extensive reference materials about literature for the young and a wide range of books for children and adolescents, including a book examination collection of new and recently published books, a comprehensive collection of recommended contemporary books, and historical literature from the 19th and early 20th centuries. The CCBC is nationally known for its services related to intellectual freedom and advocacy for multicultural literature. Each year the CCBC compiles and releases statistics documenting the number of children’s and young adult books by and/or about people of color published in the United States

As a library of the School of Education, the CCBC is committed to being a vital part of the teacher education experience on campus. The CCBC’s noncirculating collection provides immediate access to a wide range of literature for the young. CCBC librarians are available to meet with education students to help them identify children's and adolescent literature to fulfill class assignments, as well as to use in practicum and student teaching classrooms. Librarians are also available to meet with faculty and teaching assistants to discuss children's and young adult literature as it relates to the courses they are teaching.

The CCBC website provides full-text access to many national children's and young adult literature awards and recommended lists as well as specialized bibliographies from CCBC staff. The CCBC offers special events throughout the academic year that provide opportunities to hear from authors and illustrators, as well as to interact with others who are interested in books for children and teens.

Dean's List

Students have at least a 2.5 cumulative GPA and 3.5 or higher for the semester. Students must have received no incompletes in graded courses, no unreported grades, or end-of-semester academic actions for the semester. Credit/no credit and pass/fail courses are not considered in meeting the requirements for the Dean's List. 

Graduating with Honors and Graduating with Distinction

Undergraduate students are invited to wear an honors stole at graduation, representing Graduating with Honors, if they have indicated they expect to graduate at the conclusion of the current semester, have a cumulative GPA that places them in the top 20% of students expecting to graduate in their school/college, and have earned at least 60 credits in residence at UW–Madison. Credits in progress in the current semester count towards the 60 credit requirement.

Graduating With Distinction is a separate calculation and is posted to the undergraduate student's transcript after all grades and degrees have been recorded. Students qualify for the Distinction notation if they have received their degree, have a cumulative GPA that places them in the top 20% of degree recipients in their school/college, and have earned at least 60 credits in residence at UW–Madison.

Honors Options through the College of Letters & Science

Through a collaboration between the School of Education and the College of Letters & Science (L&S), students in the School of Education may participate in the L&S Honors Program, including L&S Honors in the Liberal Arts (HLA), Honors in the Major (HM), or Comprehensive Honors (both HLA and HM).

To learn more about the L&S Honors options and curricula, please visit the program's website. Students with questions about how L&S Honors connects with School of Education programs and requirements should contact Education Academic Services at 608-262-1651 to make an appointment with an advisor.

Interested students are invited to apply to the program. Admission is competitive and space is limited, but incoming first-year students who did not apply, or are denied admission, may apply later as continuing students.