The information in the Guide is current as of June 1, 2018. The Guide is an official document of record and is reviewed and updated every year. Archived editions from past years are available in the Guide and Catalog Archive. Students are responsible for meeting the academic requirements that were in effect at the time that they matriculated, including satisfactory progress and degree requirements. In situations where academic requirements have changed during a student’s time of enrollment, the Graduate School and the academic program, together with the student, may elect to enforce requirements that are in the best interest of the student. University offices can provide current information about possible changes. The Guide is published only online; printed copies are not available.

About The Graduate Guide

The Graduate Guide provides an overview of UW–Madison programs that offer graduate degrees, doctoral minors, graduate/professional certificates, and capstone certificates. Some major programs have identified sub-majors, known as named options. These official named options are approved by university governance, and appear on the transcript with degree conferral. Some programs also have unofficial specializations that do not appear on the transcript.

The Guide references program-specific policies, rules and regulations as well as Graduate School-level policies regarding admission, coursework, the awarding of degrees and certificates, and the general criteria governing satisfactory progress in a degree program.

UW–Madison Graduate School

The UW–Madison Graduate School confers the Master of Arts, Master of Science, Master of Accountancy, Master of Business Administration, Master of Music, Master of Engineering, Master of French Studies, Master of International Public Affairs, Master of Music, Master of Public Affairs, Master of Social Work, Master of Fine Arts, Doctor of Audiology, Doctor of Musical Arts, Doctor of Nursing Practice, Doctor of Occupational Therapy, and Doctor of Philosophy. Additionally, several programs that do not award graduate degrees may offer doctoral minors, specialist certificates, graduate/professional certificates, or capstone certificates.

The master's degree is conferred only upon completion of a coherent and focused program of advanced study.

The master of fine arts degree offers superior students advanced training and opportunities for creativity. The program is for the prospective professional artist and teacher in the fine arts at the college level and emphasizes creative work.

The doctor of philosophy, the doctor of nursing practice, the doctor of audiology, the doctor of occupational therapy, and the doctor of musical arts are the highest degrees conferred at UW–Madison. None are conferred solely as a result of any prescribed period of study, no matter how faithfully pursued. The Ph.D. degree is a research degree and is granted on evidence of general proficiency, distinctive attainment in a special field, and particularly on ability for independent investigation as demonstrated in a dissertation presenting original research or creative scholarship with a high degree of literary skill. The DMA degree is granted on evidence of a high degree of competence in performance, conducting, or composition. The DNP, OTD, and Au.D. degrees are clinical doctorates granted on evidence of clinical knowledge and expertise in their respective disciplinary areas.

The Ph.D., DNP, Au.D., OTD and DMA degree programs must be rationally unified, with courses that must contribute to an organized program of study and research. Courses must be selected from groups embracing one principal subject of concentration called the major (see Degrees), and if required, from one or more related fields called the doctoral minor. The major field is normally coextensive with the work of a single department or with one of the subjects under which certain programs have been formally arranged. A major may be permitted to extend beyond the above limits with the prior approval of the Dean of the Graduate School. The doctoral minor is designed to represent a coherent body of work, taken as a graduate student, and should not be simply an after-the-fact ratification of a number of courses taken outside the major department.

Graduate School minimum credits and other requirements necessary to earn these degrees are listed in the Graduate School Minimum Degree Requirements and Satisfactory Progress section; each program may set degree requirements and expectations more rigorous than the Graduate School.

Other Graduate School Publications

The Graduate School's Academic Policies and Procedures complements Graduate Student Life and provides information about Graduate School academic and administrative policies and procedures.

Graduate Student Life, published by the Graduate School Office Communications Office, offers information about a wide range of topics related to the graduate experience, and advice about the university and community from a student's perspective. It is distributed electronically to all new graduate students before they arrive on campus.

Graduate Student Professional Development

The Graduate School Office of Professional Development (OPD) coordinates, develops, and promotes learning opportunities to foster the academic, professional, and life skills of graduate students and postdoctoral researchers and scholars.

Professional development topics include Individual Development Plans, communication, mentoring, grant writing, dissertation writing, career exploration, job search strategies, and more. OPD collaborates with the Writing Center, Libraries, DoIT Software Training for Students, Delta, career centers, and others to provide a wealth of resources and events tailored to the needs of UW–Madison graduate students.

The office developed and maintains DiscoverPD, an innovative tool for UW-Madison graduate students to advance their academic and professional goals.  DiscoverPD introduces nine areas (or "facets") of professional development, includes a self-assessment, and provides a customized report of areas of strength and weakness.  The report comes with recommendations to help graduate students strengthen their ability within each area.

More information on campus resources for student professional development is available at Graduate Student Professional Development.  Students may keep up-to-date by reading GradConnections, the weekly newsletter for graduate students, and bookmarking the Events Calendar to keep tabs on upcoming workshops of interest.

Useful Links for Students

University websites useful to students are listed below. In addition, most program entries in this catalog provide links to program and department websites.

Affirmative Action and Compliance Statement

The University of Wisconsin–Madison is committed to providing equal opportunity and equal access and to complying with all applicable federal and state laws and regulations and University of Wisconsin System and university non-discrimination policies and procedures. For information on all covered bases, the names of the Title IX and Americans with Disabilities Act Coordinators, and the processes for how to file a complaint alleging discrimination, please contact the Office of Compliance. The Office of Compliance is located at 361 Bascom Hall, 500 Lincoln Drive, Madison WI 53706 and can be reached at Voice: 608-265-6018 (relay calls accepted); Fax: 608 263-4725; Email: uwcomplianceoffice@wisc.edu.

The following are the nondiscrimination bases for covering students and applicants for admission to the university; university employees and applicants for employment at the university; and those wishing to take part in university programs and activities, including visitors to campus.

Students/Educational Programs

  • age
  • ancestry
  • color
  • creed
  • disability
  • ethnicity (specifically involving harassment by UW employees)
  • gender identity or expression
  • marital or parental status
  • national origin
  • pregnancy
  • race
  • religion
  • retaliation for opposing discrimination, making a complaint of discrimination or taking part in an investigation relating to discrimination
  • sex
  • sexual orientation
  • or any other category protected by law, including physical condition or developmental disability as defined in Wisconsin Statutes§51.01(5).

Employees/Applicants 

  • age
  • ancestry
  • arrest record
  • color
  • conviction record
  • creed
  • disability
  • ethnicity (specifically involving harassment by university employees)
  • gender identity or expression
  • genetic information including genetic testing
  • honesty testing
  • marital or parental status
  • military service
  • national origin
  • pregnancy
  • race
  • religion
  • retaliation for opposing discrimination, making a complaint of discrimination or taking part in an investigation relating to discrimination
  • sex
  • sexual orientation
  • use or nonuse of lawful products off the employer’s premises during nonworking hours,
  • veteran status
  • declining to attend a meeting or participate in any communication about religious matters or political matters, or any other category protected by law

Visitors and Program Participants/University Activities

  • age
  • ​ancestry
  • color
  • creed
  • disability
  • national origin
  • race
  • retaliation for making a complaint of discrimination, or taking part in an investigation relating to discrimination, or opposing discrimination
  • sex
  • sexual orientation

Also covered is any other non-discrimination category that may be subsequently added, even if not included in the above list, as a result of federal or State of Wisconsin court, legislative, or regulatory action, or action taken by UWS or the University.

Information for Students with Disabilities

The University of Wisconsin–Madison is committed to providing equal opportunity and equal access to people with disabilities who are members of the University community. The McBurney Disability Resource Center provides disability-related services and accommodations to undergraduate, graduate, professional, Special, and guest students. The center works closely with students and faculty on the provision of reasonable accommodations to ensure access to the learning environment. Common accommodations include extended time and/or small group environment for exams, class notetakers, sign language interpreting, real time and media captioning, and conversion of printed materials to an accessible format. McBurney staff members also collaborate with students and faculty to determine reasonable flexibility with regard to attendance, participation, and deadlines for disorders that fluctuate in severity over the course of enrollment. The center makes referrals to other campus offices or community resources for nonclassroom accommodations related to housing, transportation, personal care needs, and so on. Students should contact the center upon admission to begin the eligibility for services process. Early notice is essential in order to have accommodations in place prior to the start of the semester. For detailed information, see How to Become a McBurney Client.

McBurney Disability Resource Center
702 West Johnson Street, Suite 2104
Madison, WI 53706
608-263-2741 (voice)
608-225-7956 (text)
608-265-2998 (fax)
mcburney@studentlife.wisc.edu
www.mcburney.wisc.edu

Accreditation

The University of Wisconsin–Madison is accredited by the:

Higher Learning Commission
230 South Lasalle Street, Suite 7-500
Chicago, IL 60604
telephone 1-800-621-7440
www.hlcommission.org

UW–Madison, which was first accredited in 1913, was last accredited in 2009, and will go through a reaccreditation process again in 2018–19.

See Mark of Affiliation.

Registration with the Minnesota Office of Higher Education: The University of Wisconsin–Madison is a public institution registered as a "Private Institution" with the Minnesota Office of Higher Education pursuant to sections 136A.61 to 136A.71. Registration is not an endorsement of the institution. Credits earned at the institution may not transfer to all other institutions.

The information, policies, and rules contained herein are subject to change.

Filter Graduate Degrees
Explore Data Visualizations of Enrollment, Admissions, Funding, and Degree Data

Schools and Colleges

  • College of Agricultural and Life Sciences
  • School of Business
  • Division of Continuing Studies
  • School of Education
  • College of Engineering
  • Gaylord Nelson for Environmental Studies
  • Graduate School
  • School of Human Ecology
  • Law School
  • College of Letters & Science
  • School of Medicine and Public Health
  • School of Nursing
  • School of Pharmacy
  • School of Veterinary Medicine

Distance or Flexible Programs

The university offers several degree and capstone certificate programs that are fully or partially available at a distance or that are flexible to working schedules with evening and/or weekend courses. To learn more about the graduate-level degrees and certificates offered in flexible and online formats, visit the Wisconsin Advance Your Career portal.

Other Professional Degrees

UW–Madison offers a number of post-baccalaureate professional degrees that are not administered by the Graduate School, but instead are solely supported by their home school.

Doctor of Juridical Science—SJD
Doctor of Law—J.D.
Doctor of Medicine—M.D.
Doctor of Physical Therapy—DPT
Doctor of Pharmacy—Pharm.D.
Doctor of Veterinary Medicine—DVM
Master of Genetic Counseling—MGC
Master of Laws—LLM
Master of Laws–Legal Institutions—LLM
Master of Physician Assistant Studies—P.A.
Master of Public Health—MPH

Breadth is a required component of doctoral training at UW-Madison. Given there are multiple paths to breadth, the Graduate School leaves the choice of whether students achieve breadth through a minor or other means up to the specific graduate program. Most programs require students complete either an Option A (external) minor or an Option B (distributed) minor; those that don't require a minor can be found here. See Minors in the Graduate School Academic Policies and Procedures for minimum course requirements for the minor. 

Graduate/professional certificates are available to all degree-seeking graduate and professional students (GRAD, LAW, MED, PHARM, VMED careers). Graduate/professional certificate programs coordinate teaching and research among scholars active in interrelated disciplines. Consult the certificate program regarding recognition of program completion. Certificate programs monitor their own course and satisfactory progress requirements.

The Specialist Certificate represents work beyond the master's level. For more information, contact the program.

Capstone certificates allow individuals with a bachelor’s degree to obtain additional professional skills and certification. Capstones do not lead to the conferral of a degree, but do appear on a student’s UW–Madison transcript.

Capstone certificate students are admitted as University Special students through Adult Career and Special Student Services (ACSSS). ACSSS as the academic dean is responsible for issues related to student enrollment and the student's official record.

An ACSSS student services coordinator works with each department's capstone certificate coordinator on advising, admissions, enrollment eligibility, and program completion. Capstone certificates typically follow rules of the Graduate School for tuition, credit limits, and grading. 

The University of Wisconsin–Madison has offered graduate study for more than a century. Its advanced instruction actively involves graduate students in research. The faculty of more than 2,000 distinguished scholars and teachers, supported by an academic staff exceeding 6,000 confers graduate degrees in more than 160 fields of study.

As one of the nation's major research institutions, the university maintains extensive research facilities. More than 40 campus libraries, three museums, and numerous research centers support nearly 7,500 active local, national, and international research projects.

The Graduate School website offers links to admission information, including program profiles and contacts, websites and the online application, funding resources, diversity, graduate student life and other resources.

Deadlines for applications, fellowships and other types of funding vary among programs. Requirements also vary; therefore, it is important to check program websites before applying. All transcripts are sent directly to the program. If applying to more than one program transcripts should be sent to each program. All transcripts become part of the university files and will not be returned. The application fee is set by the legislature and is nonrefundable.

When the Graduate School receives the application, the data are entered into a campuswide student administration system. The program performs the initial application review, and if desired, makes a positive admission recommendation to the Graduate School. Admission is based on demonstrated scholastic ability, letters of recommendation, the statement of purpose/reasons for graduate study, and in most programs, scores on standardized tests, such as the GRE, TOEFL or IELTS (for international students) and GMAT for Business School applicants. Program requirements may be more rigorous than Graduate School requirements.

Financial Support

Financial support is available to many graduate students on campus and comes in the form of Graduate Assistantships (e.g., Teaching, Project, or Research Assistantships), Fellowships, and Traineeships. The best source of information about these types of financial support is the faculty and staff in academic programs. Decisions about most graduate assistantships, fellowships, and traineeships are made at the program level; however, some cross-campus graduate assistantships are listed at the main Student Job Center. The Graduate School's Office of Fellowships and Funding Resources (OFFR) provides general information and direction to students about funding opportunities on and off campus.

Graduate School Office of Fellowships and Funding Resources
231 Bascom Hall, 500 Lincoln Drive
Madison, WI 53706-1380
608-265-5522; 608-262-9597
grad.wisc.edu/studentfunding/

Assistantships

Student assistants are enrolled graduate students. There are several general categories of student assistant appointments at UW–Madison.

Teaching Assistants (TA)

Teaching assistantships provide financial support to graduate students as well as opportunities for acquiring valuable teaching experience. A teaching assistant is a graduate student enrolled in the University of Wisconsin–Madison who is regularly assigned to teaching under the supervision of a faculty member or academic staff employee.

Teaching assistants who are awarded a minimum appointment of 33.33% receive full tuition remission and are eligible for comprehensive health insurance benefits.  They are, however, still responsible for paying segregated fees.

For more information, visit Types of Funding Available and reference Academic Policies and Procedures.

Program Assistants (PA)

A program assistant or project assistant (PA) is a graduate student enrolled in the University of Wisconsin System who is assigned to conduct research, training, administrative responsibilities, under the supervision of a faculty or academic staff member, primarily for the benefit of the university.

Program/project assistants are included in a labor agreement between the state of Wisconsin and the Teaching Assistants Association.

Program/project assistants who are awarded a minimum appointment of 33.33% receive full tuition remission and are eligible for comprehensive health insurance benefits. They are, however, still responsible for paying segregated fees.

For more information, visit Types of Funding Available and reference Academic Policies and Procedures.

Research Assistants (RA)

A research assistant (RA) must be a graduate student working toward a master's or Ph.D. degree. The main function of a research assistantship is to further the education and training of the student, through the individual's course of study and research directly applicable to his/her thesis or dissertation.

Research assistants who are awarded a minimum appointment of 33.33% receive full tuition remission and are eligible for comprehensive health insurance benefits. They are, however, still responsible for paying segregated fees.

For more information, visit Types of Funding Available and reference Academic Policies and Procedures.

Fellowships Administered by the Graduate School

The Graduate School administers a number of university-funded fellowships for different purposes and in different disciplines. For example, some fellowships are awarded by division, while others are offered by school or college. Applicants do not apply directly to the Graduate School for fellowship support. Academic programs nominate their most competitive students for these university-wide awards.

Fellowships may be awarded for a semester, academic (nine-month), or annual (12-month) tenure. Stipends vary according to the type of award. In 2014-2015, fellowship awards ranged from $6,455 for summer support up to $25,820 for 12 months. These awards provide for payment of tuition and fees and include eligibility for comprehensive health insurance benefits.

Federal or national fellowships currently administered by the Graduate School include: Ford Foundation Predoctoral and Dissertation Fellowships, National Physical Science Consortium (NPSC) Fellowships, National Science Foundation (NSF) Graduate Fellowships, Charlotte Newcombe Fellowships, Spencer Dissertation Fellowships, CIC–Smithsonian Institution Fellowships, Soil Science Research Council (SSRC) Fellowships, Mellon-Council for European Studies (CES) Fellowships and ACLS/Mellon Dissertation Completion Fellowships. These programs require direct application by the student to the agency and generally have early fall deadlines.

Fellowships for International Travel, Research, and Study

The International Fellowships Office, a unit of the International Institute, serves as a resource center and provides information and support to faculty, students, and staff interested in identifying international research grants, scholarships, and other funding opportunities. The International Fellowships Office also manages and coordinates a number of international fellowship competitions for UW–Madison faculty and students. Contact the International Institute at:

328 Ingraham Hall
(608) 262 9632
iris.wisc.edu/funding/

College and Program Traineeships and Fellowships

Many colleges and programs have fellowships, scholarships, and traineeship awards for students at all stages of graduate study. Awards are made available from federal training programs, research grants, gifts and trusts, and special program funds. Information on these awards is available from the program.

Office of Student Financial Aid

The Office of Student Financial Aid assists students (U.S. citizens and Permanent Residents) whose personal and family resources are not adequate to cover the expenses involved in attending UW–Madison.  For more information about processing financial aid forms to determine eligibility, part-time employment or information about scholarships and more, see the Office of Student Financial Aid website.

Effective July 1, 2012, graduate students are no longer eligible for Federal Direct Subsidized loans. For more information about changes to federal direct loans for graduate students check here.

Counseling is available to students who would like more information about financial assistance, debt management, or personal budgeting.

Office of Student Financial Aid
333 East Campus Mall, #9701
608/262-3060
finaid@finaid.wisc.edu
financialaid.wisc.edu/

Council of Graduate Schools Policy Resolution

Acceptance of an offer of financial aid (such as graduate scholarship, fellowship, traineeship, or assistantship) for the next academic year by an actual or prospective graduate student completes an agreement (based on a Resolution of the Council of Graduate Schools) which both the student and graduate school expect to honor. In those instances in which the student accepts the offer before April 15 and subsequently desires to withdraw, the student may submit in writing a resignation of the appointment at any time through April 15.

However, an acceptance given or left in force after April 15 commits the student not to accept another offer without first obtaining a written release from the institution to which a commitment has been made. Similarly, an offer by an institution after April 15 is conditional on presentation by the student of the written release from any previously accepted offer. It is further agreed by the institutions and organizations subscribing to the above Resolution that a copy of this Resolution should accompany every scholarship, fellowship, traineeship, and assistantship offer.

The Graduate School sets minimum standards that must be met by all graduate students in the university. Continuation in the Graduate School is at the discretion of the major program, the Graduate School, and the major professor. The table of Graduate School Minimum Degree Requirements and Satisfactory Progress includes the minimum credits required for each type of degree program.

The requirements of most programs exceed the Graduate School minimum criteria. These additional requirements, referred to as Minimum Degree Requirements and Satisfactory Progress, are described in each major program entry in this catalog. Students are responsible for obtaining specific degree requirements from the program. Many programs publish a graduate student handbook, which provides details about graduate study, admissions criteria, faculty interests, and the curriculum.

Graduate School Minimum Degree Requirements and Satisfactory Progress

Schools/colleges, departments and programs may set more rigorous expectations and requirements than the Graduate School.

Master's Degrees

M.A., M.S., M.Acc., MBA, M.M., M.Eng., MFS, MIPA, MPA, MSW

Minimum Graduate Degree Credit Requirement1

30 credits

Minimum Graduate Residence Credit Requirement1

16 credits

Minimum Graduate Coursework (50%) Requirement1

At least 50% of credits applied toward the graduate degree credit requirement must be in graduate-level coursework; courses with the Graduate Level Coursework attribute are identified and searchable in the university's Course Guide.

Prior Coursework Requirements: Graduate Work from Other Institutions1

For well-prepared advanced students, a student’s program may decide to accept prior graduate coursework from other institutions. This coursework does not appear on a UW–Madison transcript nor count toward graduate career GPA. The Graduate School’s minimum graduate residence requirement can be satisfied only with courses taken as a graduate student at UW–Madison. The only exception is graduate-level coursework taken as a CIC Traveling Scholar.

Prior Coursework Requirements: UW–Madison Undergraduate1

For well-prepared advanced students, a student’s program may decide to accept up to 7 credits numbered 300 or above of required or elective courses from the undergraduate work completed at UW–Madison toward fulfillment of minimum degree and minor credit requirements. However, this work would not be allowed to count toward the 50% graduate coursework minimum unless taken at the 700 level or above. This work will not appear on the graduate career portion of UW–Madison transcript nor count toward the graduate career GPA.

The Graduate School’s minimum graduate residence credit requirement can be satisfied only with courses taken as a graduate student at UW–Madison.

Prior Coursework Requirements: UW–Madison University Special1

After admission to a graduate program, the student’s program may decide to accept up to fifteen University Special student credits as fulfillment of the minimum graduate residence, graduate degree, or minor credit requirements on occasion as an exception (on a case-by-case basis).  UW–Madison coursework taken as a University Special student would not be allowed to count toward the 50% graduate coursework minimum unless taken at the 700 level or above. This work will not appear on the graduate career portion of UW–Madison transcript nor count toward the graduate career GPA.

For more information, please consult the Graduate School Academic Policies and Procedures.

Credits per Term Allowed1

Up to 15 credits

Overall Graduate GPA Requirement1

3.00

Other Grade Requirements1

The Graduate School requires an average grade of B or better in all coursework (300 or above, not including research credits) taken as a graduate student unless conditions for probationary status require higher grades. Grades of Incomplete are considered to be unsatisfactory if they are not removed during the next enrolled semester.

For more information, please consult the Graduate School Academic Policies and Procedures.

Probation Policy1

The Graduate School regularly reviews the record of any student who earned grades of BC, C, D, F, or Incomplete in a graduate course (300 or above), or grade of U in research credits. This review could result in academic probation with a hold on future enrollment or in being suspended from the Graduate School.

For more information, please consult the Graduate School Academic Policies and Procedures.

Advisor / Committee

Every graduate student is required to have an advisor. To ensure that students are making satisfactory progress toward a degree, the Graduate School expects them to meet with their advisor on a regular basis.

An advisor generally serves as the thesis advisor. In many cases, an advisor is assigned to incoming students. Students can be suspended from the Graduate School if they do not have an advisor. An advisor is a faculty member, or sometimes a committee, from the major department responsible for providing advice regarding graduate studies.

A committee often accomplishes advising for the students in the early stages of their studies.
For more information, please consult the Graduate School Academic Policies and Procedures.

Assessment and Examinations1

Requirements determined by the program.

Time Constraints1

Master’s degree students who have been absent for five or more consecutive years lose all credits that they have earned before their absence. Individual programs may count the coursework students completed prior to their absence for meeting program requirements; that coursework may not count toward Graduate School credit requirements.

For more information, please consult the Graduate School Academic Policies and Procedures.

Language Requirements1

Each program sets its own language requirements. Some programs require competence in one or more languages before students can take preliminary examinations.

For more information, please consult the Graduate School Academic Policies and Procedures.

Master of Fine Arts Degree or Specialist Certificate

MFA, Specialist Certificate

Minimum Graduate Degree Credit Requirement1

42 credits

Minimum Graduate Residence Credit Requirement1

24 credits

Minimum Graduate Coursework (50%) Requirement1

At least 50% of credits applied toward the graduate degree credit requirement must be in graduate-level coursework; courses with the Graduate Level Coursework attribute are identified and searchable in the university's Course Guide.

Prior Coursework Requirements: Graduate Work from Other Institutions1

For well-prepared advanced students, a student’s program may decide to accept prior graduate coursework from other institutions. This coursework does not appear on a UW–Madison transcript nor count toward graduate career GPA. The Graduate School’s minimum graduate residence requirement can be satisfied only with courses taken as a graduate student at UW–Madison. The only exception is graduate-level coursework take as a CIC Traveling Scholar.

Prior Coursework Requirements: UW–Madison Undergraduate1

For well-prepared advanced students, a student’s program may decide to accept up to 7 credits numbered 300 or above of required or elective courses from the undergraduate work completed at UW–Madison toward fulfillment of minimum degree and minor credit requirements. However, this work would not be allowed to count toward the 50% graduate coursework minimum unless taken at the 700 level or above. This work will not appear on the graduate career portion of UW–Madison transcript nor count toward the graduate career GPA.

The Graduate School’s minimum graduate residence credit requirement can be satisfied only with courses taken as a graduate student at UW–Madison.

Prior Coursework Requirements: UW–Madison University Special1

After admission to a graduate program, the student’s program may decide to accept up to fifteen University Special student credits as fulfillment of the minimum graduate residence, graduate degree, or minor credit requirements on occasion as an exception (on a case-by-case basis). UW–Madison coursework taken as a University Special student would not be allowed to count toward the 50% graduate coursework minimum unless taken at the 700 level or above. This work will not appear on the graduate career portion of UW–Madison transcript nor count toward the graduate career GPA.

For more information, please consult the Graduate School Academic Policies and Procedures.

Credits per Term Allowed1

Up to 15 credits

Overall Graduate GPA Requirement1

3.00

Other Grade Requirements1

The Graduate School requires an average grade of B or better in all coursework (300 or above, not including research credits) taken as a graduate student unless conditions for probationary status require higher grades. Grades of Incomplete are considered to be unsatisfactory if they are not removed during the next enrolled semester.

For more information, please consult the Graduate School Academic Policies and Procedures.

Probation Policy1

The Graduate School regularly reviews the record of any student who earned grades of BC, C, D, F, or Incomplete in a graduate course (300 or above), or grade of U in research credits. This review could result in academic probation with a hold on future enrollment or in being suspended from the Graduate School.

For more information, please consult the Graduate School Academic Policies and Procedures.

Advisor

Every graduate student is required to have an advisor. An advisor is a faculty member, or sometimes a committee, from the major department responsible for providing advice regarding graduate studies. An advisor generally serves as the thesis advisor. In many cases, an advisor is assigned to incoming students. Students can be suspended from the Graduate School if they do not have an advisor

To ensure that students are making satisfactory progress toward a degree, the Graduate School expects them to meet with their advisor on a regular basis.

A committee often accomplishes advising for the students in the early stages of their studies.

For more information, please consult the Graduate School Academic Policies and Procedures.

Assessment and Examinations1

Requirements determined by the program.

Time Constraints1

Master’s degree students who have been absent for five or more consecutive years lose all credits that they have earned before their absence. Individual programs may count the coursework students completed prior to their absence for meeting program requirements; that coursework may not count toward Graduate School credit requirements.

For more information, please consult the Graduate School Academic Policies and Procedures.

Language Requirements1

Each program sets its own language requirements. Some programs require competence in one or more languages before students can take preliminary examinations.

For more information, please consult the Graduate School Academic Policies and Procedures.

Doctoral Degrees

Au.D., DMA, DNP, OTD, Ph.D.

Minimum Graduate Degree Credit Requirement1

51 credits

Minimum Graduate Residence Credit Requirement1

32 credits

Minimum Graduate Coursework (50%) Requirement1

At least 50% of credits applied toward the graduate degree credit requirement must be in graduate-level coursework; courses with the Graduate Level Coursework attribute are identified and searchable in the university's Course Guide.

Prior Coursework Requirements: Graduate Work from Other Institutions1

For well-prepared advanced students, a student’s program may decide to accept prior graduate coursework from other institutions. This coursework does not appear on a UW–Madison transcript nor count toward graduate career GPA. The Graduate School’s minimum graduate residence requirement can be satisfied only with courses taken as a graduate student at UW–Madison. The only exception is graduate-level coursework take as a CIC Traveling Scholar.

Prior Coursework Requirements: UW–Madison Undergraduate1

For well-prepared advanced students, a student’s program may decide to accept up to 7 credits numbered 300 or above of required or elective courses from the undergraduate work completed at UW–Madison toward fulfillment of minimum degree and minor credit requirements. However, this work would not be allowed to count toward the 50% graduate coursework minimum unless taken at the 700 level or above. This work will not appear on the graduate career portion of UW–Madison transcript nor count toward the graduate career GPA. The Graduate School’s minimum graduate residence credit requirement can be satisfied only with courses taken as a graduate student at UW–Madison.

Prior Coursework Requirements: UW–Madison University Special1

After admission to a graduate program, the student’s program may decide to accept up to fifteen University Special student credits as fulfillment of the minimum graduate residence, graduate degree, or minor credit requirements on occasion as an exception (on a case-by-case basis). UW–Madison coursework taken as a University Special student would not be allowed to count toward the 50% graduate coursework minimum unless taken at the 700 level or above. This work will not appear on the graduate career portion of UW–Madison transcript nor count toward the graduate career GPA.

For more information, please consult the Graduate School Academic Policies and Procedures.

Credits per Term Allowed1

Up to 15 credits

Doctoral Minor/Breadth Requirements1

The Graduate School requires doctoral programs to have a doctoral minor requirement to achieve breadth. Only those doctoral programs which have an accepted minor opt-out request on file may excuse their students from the doctoral minor requirement with alternate paths to breadth.

For more information, please consult the Graduate School Academic Policies and Procedures.

Overall Graduate GPA Requirement1

3.00

Other Grade Requirements1

The Graduate School requires an average grade of B or better in all coursework (300 or above, not including research credits) taken as a graduate student unless conditions for probationary status require higher grades. Grades of Incomplete are considered to be unsatisfactory if they are not removed during the next enrolled semester.

For more information, please consult the Graduate School Academic Policies and Procedures.

Probation Policy1

The Graduate School regularly reviews the record of any student who earned grades of BC, C, D, F, or Incomplete in a graduate course (300 or above), or grade of U in research credits. This review could result in academic probation with a hold on future enrollment or in being suspended from the Graduate School.

For more information, please consult the Graduate School Academic Policies and Procedures.

Advisor

Every graduate student is required to have an advisor. An advisor is a faculty member, or sometimes a committee, from the major department responsible for providing advice regarding graduate studies. An advisor generally serves as the thesis advisor. In many cases, an advisor is assigned to incoming students. Students can be suspended from the Graduate School if they do not have an advisor.

To ensure that students are making satisfactory progress toward a degree, the Graduate School expects them to meet with their advisor on a regular basis.

A committee often accomplishes advising for the students in the early stages of their studies.

For more information, please consult the Graduate School Academic Policies and Procedures.

Assessment and Examinations1

Doctoral students are required to take a comprehensive preliminary/oral examination after they have cleared their record of all Incomplete and Progress grades (other than research and thesis). Deposit of the doctoral dissertation in the Graduate School is required. Additional requirements are determined by the program.2

For more information, please consult the Graduate School Academic Policies and Procedures.

Time Constraints1

Doctoral degree students who have been absent for ten or more consecutive years lose all credits that they have earned before their absence. Individual programs may count the coursework students completed prior to their absence for meeting program requirements; that coursework may not count toward Graduate School credit requirements.

A candidate for a doctoral degree who fails to take the final oral examination and deposit the dissertation within five years after passing the preliminary examination may by require to take another preliminary examination and to be admitted to candidacy a second time.

For more information, please consult the Graduate School Academic Policies and Procedures.

Language Requirements1

Each program sets its own language requirements. Some programs require competence in one or more languages before students can take preliminary examinations.

For more information, please consult the Graduate School Academic Policies and Procedures.

Academic Calendar

Establishment of the academic calendar for the University of Wisconsin–Madison falls within the authority of the faculty as set forth in Faculty Policies and Procedures. Construction of the academic calendar is subject to various rules and guidelines prescribed by the Board of Regents, the Faculty Senate and State of Wisconsin legislation. Approximately every five years, the Faculty Senate approves a new academic calendar which spans a future five-year period.
The current calendar was adopted by the Faculty Senate in September 2016.