ART HIST 101 — THE STUDY OF ART, PRESENT AND PAST

4 credits.

A critical introduction to the materials, techniques, and interpretation of art. Discussions of the art of various times and cultures, including contemporary America.

ART HIST 103 — ART MATTERS: TOPICS IN ART HISTORY

3-4 credits.

An accessible introduction to World Art through changing themes. Engaging mini-lectures by professors in different fields of art history coordinated by a framework of foundational information and class exercises. Includes Western Art from Ancient to Contemporary, Chinese Art, Japanese Art, Islamic Art, and African Art, with an emphasis on the arts of the diverse populations of the United States.

ART HIST 105 — INTRODUCTORY TOPICS IN ART HISTORY

3 credits.

This is a seminar-type course primarily to be offered as a FIG coordinating course. Topics will vary.

ART HIST 201 — HISTORY OF WESTERN ART I: FROM PYRAMIDS TO CATHEDRALS

4 credits.

Examines the arts and cultures of Europe and the Mediterranean basin before the Renaissance. We explore canonical works such as the pyramids at Giza, the Parthenon in Athens, the Venus di Milo, Hagia Sophia in Constantinople, the Book of Kells, the Great Mosque at Córdoba, Chartres cathedral, and Giotto's Arena Chapel. But we also define art broadly, to encompass the material culture of everyday life, including jewelry, ceramics, and textiles. We consider the social and historical contexts of art and artistic production - art and imperialism, ethnicity, technology, religious ritual and belief, and myth and storytelling. These explorations address basic human concerns: death and the afterlife, desire and the body, self-definition and portraiture, power and propaganda, monstrosity and the supernatural, the divine and the sacred. We develop crucial skill sets: critical visual analysis, contextual interpretation, research methods and resources, historiography, and oral, written and digital communication. Students will apply these skills in assignments focused on works of art in the Chazen Museum.

ART HIST 202 — HISTORY OF WESTERN ART II: FROM RENAISSANCE TO CONTEMPORARY

4 credits.

Examines the arts and cultures of Europe and North America from the Renaissance through the present. Our discussions will explore important masterpieces by such renowned artists as Leonardo da Vinci, Rembrandt van Rijn, Claude Monet, Paul Cézanne, Pablo Picasso, Frida Kahlo, and Frank Lloyd Wright alongside other works of fine art, architecture, the decorative arts, and photography. By studying the political, historical, social and cultural contexts of their making, we will begin to understand how certain works of art were valued from the moment of their making, fought over by different nations, bought, sold, stolen, or ignored for centuries and revived only recently for study. We will critically examine the concept of artistic genius; the influence of colonialism and imperialism on artistic production and consumption; the role of the patron and the art market in art's production and circulation; the relationship of fine art and popular culture; and the idea of globalization as it relates to "western" artistic traditions. Students will develop skills in visual analysis that can help them understand artistic production over the past 500 years as well as succeed in today's visually oriented culture. They will also learn about dominant interpretive approaches and research tools in art history that have applicability across the humanities as well as digital applications that will help them create online exhibitions. Many assignments will focus on works of art in the Chazen Museum of Art.

ART HIST 203 — SURVEY OF ASIAN ART

3-4 credits.

Introduction to the artistic traditions of China and Japan from neolithic times to the nineteenth century and the Buddhist art of India with its subsequent East Asia embodiments.

ART HIST/​AFROAMER  204 — INTRODUCTION TO VISUAL CULTURES

3 credits.

This is a foundation course in the transdisciplinary field of Visual Cultures. It examines theories and technologies of vision and visuality in their disparate manifestations over time and cultures and geographies.

ART HIST 205 — GLOBAL ARTS

4 credits.

ART IS GLOBAL (and always has been). Today, we find Egyptian protest artists inspiring activists around the globe via the internet, but in earlier times, Roman glass and Buddhist icons moved along the ancient Silk Route, networks of exchange flourished in the medieval Mediterranean region, and colonial empires brought visual cultures into volatile contact. This course teaches students how to analyze images and objects produced through such exchanges that occurred around the world from ancient times through the contemporary. Its aims are to develop skills needed to live fully in a world in which borders are no barriers to the movement of images, objects, and ideas and to deepen understanding of cultural differences and interactions. By exploring works in a range of media and tracing processes of cross-cultural exchange, the course also develops sensitivity to visual and material form and a solid foundation in the practice of visual and material analysis.

ART HIST 206 — SURVEY OF PHOTOGRAPHY: 1839 TO 1989

3-4 credits.

Survey of 150 years of photography's processes, practitioners, and genres. Emphasis on tensions between its commercial, vernacular, and artistic forms.

ART HIST 208 — WESTERN ARCHITECTURE: RENAISSANCE TO MODERN

4 credits.

A chronological survey of the development of European architecture from the early fifteenth century to the twentieth.

ART HIST 227 — THE ENDS OF MODERNISM

4 credits.

This course considers the end of Modernist art as it gives way to what is called, problematically, contemporary art. While the term modern may generally mean what is vanguard or current, Modernism indicates a period of art (and the humanities) ranging from, arguably, 1880-1950. By considering its end, one can study four pivotal aspects of the movement: its origins, themes, and afterlives, as well as the art and histories that challenge its coherence. In this thematic survey, then, Modernism will emerge as a heterogeneous set of images and attendant discourses which, negatively or positively, continue to work within the contemporary artistic and cultural moment.

ART HIST/​AFROAMER  241 — INTRODUCTION TO AFRICAN ART AND ARCHITECTURE

3 credits.

This course examines the rich heritage of African arts and architecture as they shape and have been shaped by the histories and cultural values (social, political, religious, philosophical, and aesthetic) of African peoples, both past and present, on the continent where humanity began. It includes an historical overview of selected artistic traditions from different parts of the continent from 26,000 BCE to the 21st century and thematic/cultural case studies: artists and aesthetics; textiles, decorative, and personal/body arts; architecture; and individual artists.

ART HIST/​AFROAMER  242 — INTRODUCTION TO AFRO-AMERICAN ART

3 credits.

Historical survey of Afro-American art. Beginning with the African heritage and concluding with creativity of the 1970's, it examines the evolution of Afro-American art. Attention to the aesthetic sensibilities of diverse styles as well as the social significance of Black art within the art arena.

ART HIST/​ANTHRO/​DS 264/​HISTORY/​LAND ARC  264 — DIMENSIONS OF MATERIAL CULTURE

4 credits.

This course introduces students to the interdisciplinary field of material culture studies. It is intended for students interested in any professional endeavor related to material culture, including careers in museums, galleries, historical societies, historic preservation organizations, and academic institutions. During the semester, students have varied opportunities to engage with and contemplate the material world to which people give meaning and which, in turn, influences their lives. Sessions combine in some way the following: presentations from faculty members and professionals who lecture on a phase of material culture related to his/her own scholarship or other professional work; discussion of foundational readings in the field; visits to collections and sites on campus and around Madison; discussion of readings assigned by visiting presenters or the professors; and exams and short papers that engage material culture topics.

ART HIST/​CLASSICS  300 — THE ART AND ARCHAEOLOGY OF ANCIENT GREECE

3-4 credits.

Explores the art and archaeology of ancient Greece from the Bronze Age through the Hellenistic period.

ART HIST 301 — MYTHS, LOVES, AND LIVES IN GREEK VASES

3-4 credits.

Explore the world of the ancient Greeks through their painted pottery. Greek pottery offers a uniquely rich imagery of mythology, athletics, domestic scenes, fabulous monsters, drinking parties, and other aspects of Greek life and imagination. They were used by ordinary people, and their use offers insights into their everyday lives and concerns, and a counterbalance to the elite accounts preserved in literature and poetry. The course will consider the long history of Greek vases from about 800 BC until about 350 BC, and focus on themes such as relationships with the East, myth and epic poetry, narrative, and everyday subjects such as women's lives, death and the afterlife, and the symposium. We will make use of the excellent collection of Greek vases in the Chazen Museum, and students will write research papers using that collection.

ART HIST 302 — GREEK SCULPTURE

3-4 credits.

Problems in style, techniques and reconstruction of glyptic sculpture, koroplastics and bronzes from the Late Bronze Age through fifth century B.C.

ART HIST/​CLASSICS  304 — THE ART AND ARCHAEOLOGY OF ANCIENT ROME

3-4 credits.

Explores the art and archaeology of ancient Italy, the Roman Republic, and the Roman Empire from the Iron Age to Late Antiquity.

ART HIST 305 — HISTORY OF ISLAMIC ART AND ARCHITECTURE

3 credits.

This course surveys the architecture, landscape, book arts, and luxury objects produced in Islamic contexts from Spain to India from the 7th through the 21st centuries. Attention will be focused upon the relationships between Islamic visual idioms and localized religious, political, and socioeconomic circumstances. In particular, lectures and readings will examine the vital roles played by theology, royal patronage, ceremonies, gift exchange, trade, and workshop practices in the formulation of visual traditions.

ART HIST 307 — EARLY CHINESE ART: FROM ANTIQUITY TO THE TENTH CENTURY

3 credits.

This course introduces art forms and concepts developed in China from antiquity to mid-10th century, covering jade carving, metalwork, sculpture, ceramics, calligraphy, painting woodblock printing, and architecture mostly created for religious or funerary purposes. Emerging aesthetic concepts also discussed.

ART HIST 308 — LATER CHINESE ART: FROM THE TENTH CENTURY TO THE PRESENT

3 credits.

Traces the evolution of art forms and concepts from mid-10th century onward, and examines their transformations in modern and contemporary China. Organized chronologically, the course presents developments in painting, calligraphy, woodblock printing, ceramics, architecture, and multimedia installations.

ART HIST 310 — EARLY CHRISTIAN AND BYZANTINE ART

3-4 credits.

Evolving forms of the arts in the period of the first great Christian era.

ART HIST 318 — ROMANESQUE AND GOTHIC ART AND ARCHITECTURE

3-4 credits.

Art and architecture of Western Europe, ca. 1000 to ca. 1350. Particular emphasis on the relaionship of the arts to theology, ritual, concepts of the body, rulership and courtliness. Open to Fr

ART HIST 320 — ITALIAN RENAISSANCE ART

3-4 credits.

Painting, sculpture, and architecture.

ART HIST 321 — ITALIAN ART: 1250-1400

3-4 credits.

Developments in the arts within the broader historical and cultural context: issues of artistic style, patronage, the artist's emerging self-consciousness. Major artists include Giotto, Duccio, the Pisani, Simone Martini, and Altichiero.

ART HIST 322 — ITALIAN ART FROM DONATELLO TO LEONARDO DA VINCI, 1400-1500

3-4 credits.

Stylistic analysis of 15th century art in Florence and other regional centers. Emphasis on the relationship between the arts and the historical/cultural context.

ART HIST 323 — FROM MICHELANGELO & RAPHAEL TO TITIAN: THE ARTS IN 16TH CENTURY ITALY

3-4 credits.

This course runs from 1500-1570, or the High Renaissance to Mannerism, and concludes at the beginning of the Church Reform period. Emphasis is on painting, sculpture and architecture, but the graphic and decorative arts as well as patronage and the impact of global discoveries also are included.

ART HIST 330 — THE PAINTING & GRAPHIC ARTS OF GERMANY 1350-1530

3-4 credits.

Leaders in German painting and graphics including Stephan Lochner, the Master ES, Durer, and Grunewald.

ART HIST 331 — ANGELS, DEMONS, AND NUDES: EARLY NETHERLANDISH PAINTING FROM BOSCH TO BRUEGEL

3-4 credits.

Over the course of the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries, painting in the Netherlands experienced dramatic technological advancements: the application of oil on panel allowed for an unprecedented richness of color; experiments with optics led to improved illusions of space; artists rendered light and reflections as never before. Did these advancements in depicting the natural world conflict with or enhance the portrayal of spiritual visions? Did realism pave the way for secular art? In this course, we will look critically at the relationship of science and art, tradition and innovation, the imagined and the experienced. The delicate preciousness of Jan van Eyck, the strange spaces of Petrus Christus, the bizarre hellscapes of Hieronymus Bosch, and the peasant festivals of Peter Bruegel will guide us through these themes.

ART HIST 332 — NORTHERN PAINTING AND GRAPHICS FROM BOSCH AND HOLBEIN TO BRUEGEL

3-4 credits.

Late Renaissance and Mannerism in the Netherlands and Germany. Includes Bosch, Bruegel, Cranach, Holbein.

ART HIST 333 — NETHERLANDISH PAINTING OF THE 17TH CENTURY

3-4 credits.

Masters of landscape, genre, religious painting, and portraiture of the Low Countries, including Rubens, Rembrandt, Hals, and Vermeer.

ART HIST 334 — PRINTS AND MASTER PRINTMAKERS OF THE WESTERN WORLD

3-4 credits.

Art in the graphic media, from the fifteenth century to the recent past.

ART HIST 335 — STUDY ABROAD IN ANCIENT/MEDIEVAL ART

1-6 credits.

Treatment of an art historical topic in a course offered at a university outside the United States.

ART HIST 336 — STUDY ABROAD IN RENAISSANCE/BAROQUE/NORTHERN ART

1-6 credits.

Treatment of an art historical topic in a course offered at a university outside the United States.

ART HIST 337 — STUDY ABROAD IN 18TH-20TH CENTURY ART

1-6 credits.

Treatment of an art historical topic in a course offered at a university outside the United States.

ART HIST 338 — STUDY ABROAD IN AFRICAN/ASIAN ART

1-6 credits.

Treatment of an art historical topic in a course offered at a university outside the United States.

ART HIST 341 — ITALIAN BAROQUE ART

3-4 credits.

Italian painting, sculpture, architecture, and the graphic arts between 1600 and 1750 with emphasis on Caravaggio, the Carracci, Artemesia Gentileschi, Bernini, Algardi, Borromini, the Tiepolo family, and Piranese.

ART HIST 346 — BRITISH ART AND SOCIETY FROM THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY TO THE PRESENT

3-4 credits.

Major movements covered include: eighteenth century art of the public sphere (Hogarth, Wright of Derby), Neo-Classicism (Reynolds), Romanticism (Blake, Turner), landscape, Pre-Raphaelites, modern movements and the postmodern revival of British art.

ART HIST 350 — 19TH CENTURY PAINTING IN EUROPE

3-4 credits.

History of European painting from 1800 to 1900.

ART HIST 351 — 20TH CENTURY ART IN EUROPE

3-4 credits.

Major artists and movements from 1880 to 1950.

ART HIST 354 — CROSS-CULTURAL ARTS AROUND THE ATLANTIC RIM: 1800 TO THE PRESENT

3-4 credits.

Interdisciplinary study of cross-cultural exchange and conflict, focusing on the visual arts, with sections on literature, film and music from the Americas, Africa and Europe.

ART HIST 355 — HISTORY OF PHOTOGRAPHY

3 credits.

European and American photography from its invention to the challenge of electronic media, emphasizing the student's development of a critical approach to the medium.

ART HIST 357 — EUROPEAN ARCHITECTURE: THE NINETEENTH CENTURY

3-4 credits.

Architecture of the 19th century in France, Britain, Germany, and Spain.

ART HIST 358 — EUROPEAN ARCHITECTURE: THE MODERN MOVEMENTS

3-4 credits.

Major architectural trends in Europe from 1900 to 1939.

ART HIST/​AMER IND  359 — AMERICAN INDIAN ART HISTORY: CONTEMPORARY ISSUES

3 credits.

A thematic introduction to contemporary (1960 - present) Native North American art drawing from historic (pre and post-contact) precedents. Topics are generated from the conceptual themes of contact, conflict, exchange, appropriation and re-appropriation of American Indian imagery, materials, and ideas.

ART HIST 360 — EARLY MODERN ART OF NORTHERN EUROPE: RENAISSANCES AND REFORMATIONS

3 credits.

This course critically reexamines concepts traditionally associated with the Renaissance by focusing on the exchange of artistic ideas throughout the Holy Roman Empire and across different media, such as altarpiece paintings, carved portraits, stained glass narratives, innovative uses of print, reappropriations of metalwork, and expressive uses of drawing. The course is organized thematically around four topics: religious art as piety and politics; antiquity as a source of tradition and imagination; the formulation of a public discourse that exposed social threats; and the distinctiveness of artistic claims of individual achievement. A motif throughout the course is the question of how the survival of fragments may be presented in museum contexts as parts standing in for an absent whole. Special topics address collecting, conservation, and technical research. We will also consider how historians approach designs for works of art now lost or never completed. Assignments focus on objects from the Chazen Museum and the Special Collections of Memorial Library.

ART HIST/​DS 363  363 — AMERICAN DECORATIVE ARTS AND INTERIORS: 1620-1840

3-4 credits.

Interdisciplinary study of the design, production, and consumption of household objects and their American domestic settings, 17th through the early 19th centuries.

ART HIST 364 — HISTORY OF AMERICAN ART: ART, MATERIAL CULTURE, AND CONSTRUCTIONS OF IDENTITY, 1607-PRESENT

3-4 credits.

This course examines the history of American Art from the period of permanent European settlement through the present. Works of art and other forms of material culture will be explored and discussed within the context of philosophical, historical, social, and cultural developments in the United States and across the globe. In this course, works of art and artifacts are interpreted not as passive objects that reflect history, but rather as active agents that are entwined with broader historical, social, and cultural events. A particular focus will be on the ways in which American art and material culture participates in the construction of identities - ranging from global identities and national identities (in particular, how notions of "American" have been constructed) to regional, group and individual identities. Although the course will mainly cover works of painting, sculpture, and architecture, other forms of material culture, especially photography, decorative arts and popular illustrations, will also be considered. Attention will also be given to the writings of artists and critics, as well as texts by contemporary art historians, historians, and other scholars that illustrate the variety of methods that are currently being brought to bear on the interpretation of American art, architecture, and material culture. Students will learn skills that will help them construct histories of American art and material culture in written narratives (papers) as well as in online exhibitions through a series of short research exercises. Outside of examinations, assignments will be tied to works of art on display at the Chazen Museum of Art or other local collections.

ART HIST 365 — THE CONCEPT OF CONTEMPORARY ART

3-4 credits.

Traces out some of the radical changes in art produced after roughly 1950, or what might be called contemporary art. By using the term contemporary, however, we also refer to a certain broadly defined set of ideas that inform and emerge from this highly diverse production. The course will largely (although not exclusively) focus on American and European art after the "decline" of Modernism. That entails familiarizing the class with movements ranging from color field painting, to postmodern production, to performance, video, and installation. Additionally, attention will be paid to artists and artwork that are not adequately represented by the traditional categories of art history.

ART HIST 367 — AMERICAN ARCHITECTURE: COLONIAL AND FEDERAL

3-4 credits.

American architecture from the sixteenth through the early nineteenth centuries, covering English, Spanish, Dutch and French colonial styles and the Federal period.

ART HIST 368 — AMERICAN ARCHITECTURE: THE 19TH CENTURY

3-4 credits.

Major architects and trends in American architecture from the Greek Revival to the Chicago School.

ART HIST 371 — CHINESE PAINTING

3-4 credits.

A survey of Chinese painting from the third century B.C. to the 18th century, introducing the important masters of each period and discussing the esthetic concepts and theories that underlie traditional connoisseurship.

ART HIST 372 — ARTS OF JAPAN

3-4 credits.

A survey of Japanese art, including painting, sculpture, architecture, woodblock prints and various crafts.

ART HIST/​RELIG ST  373 — GREAT CITIES OF ISLAM

3 credits.

This course offers a comparative study of the foundation and development of five great cities in the history of Islam: Cairo, Istanbul, Delhi, Mecca, and Isfahan. Architectural projects, ornamental idioms, and changes to the urban plan are studied from aesthetic and cultural perspectives. Integrating historical and religious studies, this course highlights the shifting nature of Islamic culture, from the tenth century CE to the present.

ART HIST 375 — LATER JAPANESE PAINTING AND WOODBLOCK PRINTS

3-4 credits.

An introduction to the history and aesthetics of Japanese painting and woodblock prints from 1600 to 1900.

ART HIST/​LCA  379 — CITIES OF ASIA

3 credits.

Historical overview of the built environment of cities of Asia from antiquity to the present; architectural and urban legacy in its social and historical context; exploration of common themes that thread through the diverse geographical regions and cultures of Asia.

ART HIST 390 — PRE-COLUMBIAN ART

3-4 credits.

ART HIST 405 — CITIES AND SANCTUARIES OF ANCIENT GREECE

3 credits.

Topics include urbanism in ancient Greece in theory and practice; the forms, technologies, patronage and use of buildings; the creation and conception of urban space; and the organization of religious sites, dedications, and rituals.

ART HIST 407 — TOPICS IN NINETEENTH CENTURY ART

3-4 credits.

An advanced lecture course, covering specific aspects of nineteenth century visual culture. Topics include: representations of race and gender; the history of photography; popular imagery and aspects of Modernism.

ART HIST 408 — TOPICS IN TWENTIETH-CENTURY ART

3-4 credits.

Advanced lecture course on special topics of 20th-century art that focuses variously on Europe, England, America, or their international interaction. Emphasis on art in its historical and social context.

ART HIST 411 — TOPICS IN ASIAN ART

3-4 credits.

In-depth examination of special topics related to Asian art, including South Asia, East Asia, Southeast Asia, and Central Asia.

ART HIST 412 — TOPICS IN AFRICAN AND AFRICAN DIASPORA ART HISTORY

3-4 credits.

Cultural and historical forces that have shaped the arts of either a specific people or a specific site in Africa or the African Americas.

ART HIST 413 — ART AND ARCHITECTURE IN THE AGE OF THE CALIPHS

3 credits.

The tenth century CE marked a period of drastic change in the Islamic world, as the unified Islamic caliphate splintered into three rival dynasties: the Sunni Iraqi Abbasids, Spanish Umayyads, and the Shi'ite Fatimids in Egypt. In their quest to dominate the Islamic world and control the Mediterranean, each dynasty openly competed and responded to the others in architectural projects, ceremonial practices and courtly arts. At the same time, the monolithic model of courtly patronage of the arts was replaced gradually by one in which the urban classes increasingly shaped the art market, resulting in new visual forms. This course considers this turning point in the history of Islamic culture through the lens of art and architectural patronage. By exploring the architectural and urban projects of the three dynasties, we will examine competing visions of power, sources of legitimacy and the development of Cairo, Baghdad/Samarra and Cordoba as capital cities. We will also consider the role of portable arts, addressing the role of exchange and gift-giving in the Mediterranean context and the problems of attribution in this highly mobile environment. Course themes include the role of sectarian identity (Shi'ite vs Sunni); the incorporation of Christian and Jewish culture; the relation between the court and urban populations; and the meaning of ornament and style in Islamic art.

ART HIST/​MEDIEVAL  415 — TOPICS IN MEDIEVAL ART

3 credits.

An advanced lecture course, covering specific aspects of Medieval art. Topics may include: "Death and the Afterlife in Medieval Art"; "Civic Art and Architecture and Public Space in Medieval Italy"; "Rome in the Middle Ages"; "Pilgrimage the Cult of the Saints in Medieval Byzantine Art."

ART HIST 420 — TOPICS IN ITALIAN RENAISSANCE ART

3 credits.

An advanced lecture course, covering specific aspects of Italian Renaissance art. Topics may include: "Material Culture: Is 'Copying' Imitatio?"; "Concepts of Race"; "'Authorship' vs. Collaboration"; "Colonialism as Trade"; "Gender at Stake."

ART HIST 425 — RACE AND GENDER IN ITALIAN EARLY MODERN ART

3 credits.

This course focuses on critical omissions in traditional characterizations of Italian Renaissance art. Gender and race issues created tensions between historical contexts and visual representations, often idealized or obscured. The course reevaluates imagery of nudes, witches, children, and material culture.

ART HIST/​LCA  428 — VISUAL CULTURES OF SOUTH ASIA

3 credits.

Concentrates on image complexes (art, photography, and cinema) and visual environments (architecture, urban planning, and public rituals) of South Asia; examination of visual culture through thematic issues such as, sexuality, patronage, cultural encounter, transculturation, ways of viewing, modernism, and nationalism.

ART HIST 430 — TOPICS IN VISUAL CULTURE

3 credits.

Introduces key issues, theories, and methods in visual cultures studies, emphasizing aspects that affect the practices of art history and providing a changing topical focus that addresses new research in this developing interdisciplinary area.

ART HIST 431 — TOPICS IN THEORY

3 credits.

Introduces philosophy and theory relevant to the study of art history and visual cultures with a focus on a particular body of theoretical work and an organization in terms of key questions and concepts.

ART HIST 432 — MULTICULTURALISM AND THE NEW MUSEOLOGY

3-4 credits.

Museums and Multiculturalism addresses historic and current trends in museum studies and the impact of shifting professional and popular standards on these movements. The significance of the object in various cultural contexts is critically examined.

ART HIST 433 — SIGN, SYMBOL, STEREOTYPE: NATIVE ICONS REVEALED

3-4 credits.

Native Icons" critically examines images of Native American Indians - from the diverse contexts of fine arts, popular culture, photography and film - in historic and contemporary cultural contexts.

ART HIST 435 — STUDY ABROAD IN ANCIENT/MEDIEVAL ART

1-6 credits.

Treatment of an art historical topic in a course offered at a university outside the United States.

ART HIST 436 — STUDY ABROAD IN RENAISSANCE/BAROQUE/NORTHERN ART

1-6 credits.

Treatment of an art historical topic in a course offered at a university outside the United States.

ART HIST 437 — STUDY ABROAD IN 18TH-20TH CENTURY ART

1-6 credits.

Treatment of an art historical topic in a course offered at a university outside the United States.

ART HIST 438 — STUDY ABROAD IN AFRICAN/ASIAN ART

1-6 credits.

Treatment of an art historical topic in a course offered at a university outside the United States.

ART HIST 440 — ART AND POWER IN THE ARAB WORLD

3 credits.

This course considers the use of art and architecture as an expression of power in the Arab world, from the seventh century to the present. Beginning with the establishment of the caliphate and ending with the arts of revolution following the Arab Spring, we will investigate the shifting role of art and architecture in the quest for political dominance. With a particular focus on the arts of Cairo, Baghdad, Cordoba, Mecca, Jerusalem, Damascus, and the modern Arabian Gulf, we will explore competing visions of power and sources of legitimacy, through the lens of artistic production.

ART HIST 449 — TOPICS IN ARCHITECTURAL HISTORY

3 credits.

Assessment of how cultural phenomena help shape a given architectural development.

ART HIST 454 — ART IN GERMANY, 1900-1945

3-4 credits.

Expressionism and its sources, with an emphasis on developments prior to World War I; the Bauhaus and the later careers of major figures.

ART HIST 457 — HISTORY OF AMERICAN VERNACULAR ARCHITECTURE AND LANDSCAPES

3 credits.

Survey of American vernacular buildings and landscapes from the colonial period to the present. Emphasis is on acquiring descriptive tools and developing interpretive frameworks to explore the significance that these vernacular environments have had for their makers and users.

ART HIST 463 — TOPICS IN AMERICAN MATERIAL CULTURE

3-4 credits.

In depth examination of special topics related to material culture and the decorative arts, including craftsmanship, consumerism, representations of race, ethnicity, and gender, and museum histories and exhibition practices.

ART HIST/​DS 464/​HISTORY  464 — DIMENSIONS OF MATERIAL CULTURE

3 credits.

Approaches to the interdisciplinary study of the material world in order to analyze broader social and cultural issues. Guest speakers explore private and public objects and spaces from historic, ethnographic, and aesthetic perspectives.

ART HIST 468 — FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT

3-4 credits.

An analysis of Frank Lloyd Wright's architecture and writings.

ART HIST 469 — INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES IN THE ARTS

1-4 credits.

Guest artists will offer interdisciplinary courses on topics appropriate to their specializations.

ART HIST 475 — JAPANESE CERAMICS AND ALLIED ARTS

3 credits.

A history of Japanese ceramics and related topics such as Chinese and Korean ceramics and the tea ceremony. Emphasis placed on the technological, cultural, political, and economic, as well as aesthetic, dimentions of ceramic development. Knowledge of Japan recommended

ART HIST/​RELIG ST  478 — ART AND RELIGIOUS PRACTICE IN MEDIEVAL JAPAN

3 credits.

A study of spaces, objects, and images within the context of religious belief and practice in Japan between 1300 and 1600, when great Zen monasteries grew up alongside older Buddhist/Shinto religious "megaplexes," and new salvationist sects spread throughout Japan. Knowledge of Asian religion recommended

ART HIST 479 — ART AND HISTORY IN AFRICA

3-4 credits.

Selected African art traditions in their historical and cultural settings.

ART HIST 500 — PROSEMINAR: SPECIAL TOPICS IN ART HISTORY

3 credits.

ART HIST 505 — PROSEMINAR IN ANCIENT ART

3 credits.

ART HIST 506 — CURATORIAL STUDIES EXHIBITION PRACTICE

3 credits.

This course will engage students in all aspects of the preparation of an exhibition for the Chazen Museum of Art or other exhibition spaces on campus. Students will help conceptualize the exhibition and its layout, research and interpret individual objects, prepare wall texts for the display and other materials published in print or online in conjunction with the exhibition. The specific topic will be different each time the course is taught. At least one previous course in Art History at 300 level or above. Preference will be given to students enrolled in the Curatorial Studies Certificate programs

ART HIST 515 — PROSEMINAR IN MEDIEVAL ART

3 credits.

ART HIST 525 — PROSEMINAR IN ITALIAN RENAISSANCE ART

3 credits.

ART HIST 535 — PROSEMINAR IN NORTHERN EUROPEAN PAINTING

3 credits.

ART HIST 555 — PROSEMINAR IN 19TH CENTURY EUROPEAN ART

3 credits.

ART HIST 556 — PROSEMINAR IN 20TH CENTURY EUROPEAN ART

3 credits.

ART HIST 563 — PROSEMINAR IN MATERIAL CULTURE

3 credits.

Interdisciplinary study of the way people use objects and environments to express identities and relationships in households, communities, and larger social/economic systems.

ART HIST 565 — PROSEMINAR IN AMERICAN ART

3 credits.

ART HIST 567 — PROSEMINAR IN AMERICAN ARCHITECTURE

3 credits.

ART HIST 569 — INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES IN THE ARTS

1-4 credits.

Guest artists will offer interdisciplinary courses on topics appropriate to their specializations.

ART HIST 575 — PROSEMINAR IN JAPANESE ART

3 credits.

ART HIST 576 — PROSEMINAR IN CHINESE ART

3 credits.

ART HIST 579 — PROSEMINAR IN AFRICAN ART

3 credits.

Study (either thematic or culture-specific) of African arts and architecture in historical and cultural perspectives.

ART HIST 600 — SPECIAL TOPICS IN ART HISTORY

3 credits.

ART HIST 601 — INTRODUCTION TO MUSEUM STUDIES I

3 credits.

History of museums and collecting; introduction to connoisseurship; studies and practices in art museum activities; experience in exhibition planning, research, cataloging, and installation.

ART HIST 602 — INTRODUCTION TO MUSEUM STUDIES II

3 credits.

Continuation of 601

ART HIST 603 — CURATORIAL STUDIES COLLOQUIUM

3 credits.

This course is designed to introduce advanced undergraduate students to a broad range of questions, both theoretical and practical, related to curatorial practice. The core of the course is a series of sessions on curatorial strategies. Particular emphasis will be placed on integrative and collaborative approaches to curating a wide variety of material: art, film, music, books, anthropology/culture, archeology, history, geology, zoology, dance, etc. With this ideal in mind, we will bring in a series of experts to engage with each other and with the class on the theories, objectives, and processes of conceiving, designing, and mounting exhibitions, as well as reaching different audiences with both physical and virtual exhibitions. Students will also be introduced to the distinctive collections and resources on campus and in the region.

ART HIST/​LCA  621 — MAPPING, MAKING, AND REPRESENTING COLONIAL SPACES

3 credits.

Spatial lagacy of colonialism; explores important ways in which the population, landscape, architecture, and urban environment of colonies were mapped, made, and represented, particularly in the 19th and 20th centuries; theoretical and empirical analyses from diverse disciplines and spatial terrain.

ART HIST/​AFROAMER  643 — SELECTED TOPICS IN AFRICAN DIASPORA ART HISTORY

3 credits.

Art history of a specific African cultural tradition (eg. Yoruba, Kongo, Fon, Akan) and its transformation in the Caribbean, Central and South America in response to new social, historical, and hegemonic forces.

ART HIST/​HISTORY/​JOURN/​L I S  650 — HISTORY OF BOOKS AND PRINT CULTURE IN EUROPE AND NORTH AMERICA

3 credits.

History of books and print culture in the West from ancient times to the present. Focus on the influence of reading and writing on social, cultural, and intellectual life. Methodologies, theories, and sources for study of book and print culture history.

ART HIST 681 — SENIOR HONORS THESIS

3 credits.

ART HIST 682 — SENIOR HONORS THESIS

3 credits.

ART HIST 691 — SENIOR THESIS

3-6 credits.

ART HIST 692 — SENIOR THESIS

3-6 credits.

ART HIST 697 — UNDERGRADUATE CURATORIAL STUDIES INTERNSHIP (DIRECTED STUDY)

1-3 credits.

This directed study may serve as an elective for the new undergraduate certificate in Curatorial Studies, as an elective for the Material Culture certificate program, or for a specific stand-alone project. The goal is to give students credit for applied learning experiences in museums and other curatorial settings. Students must identify internship possibilities and have them approved for credit by the faculty member who will serve as instructor of record, and oversee the academic side of the internship. The nature of the internship will vary according to the host institution, but to be accepted for credit, it must have a substantial research component. Examples include but are not limited to: assisting a curator or registrar with research for an exhibition or permanent collection display; producing wall texts and object labels in an exhibition or permanent collection display; researching and writing catalog entries or essays on an object or objects in an exhibition or permanent collection; preparing catalog entries for works in the permanent collection of a museum/historical society; assisting a curator preparing a dossier for acquisitions; researching conservation histories of objects; provenance research; preparing teaching materials associated with an exhibition or permanent collection either in print of online; preparing and giving public tours of exhibitions or permanent collections; participating in exhibition design. To fulfill a 3-credit internship, the student must average approximately 12 hours a week throughout the semester, including working at the host institution on individual projects, and performing any necessary research and writing outside the host institution. In addition, the student should meet with the faculty advisor for a minimum of 1 hour each month.

ART HIST 698 — DIRECTED STUDY

2-3 credits.

ART HIST 699 — DIRECTED STUDY

1-3 credits.

ART HIST/​CLASSICS  700 — THE ART AND ARCHAEOLOGY OF ANCIENT GREECE

3 credits.

Explores the art and archaeology of ancient Greece from the Bronze Age through the Hellenistic period.

ART HIST 701 — PRACTICUM IN ART HISTORY: BIBLIOGRAPHY, HISTORIOGRAPHY, METHODS

3 credits.

Required methodology course for first-year graduate students in art history. Intensive work in critical analysis and research methods; introduction to the methods and historiography of art history; orientation to source work in the Elvehjem collection and in University libraries.

ART HIST 703 — CURATORIAL STUDIES COLLOQUIUM

3 credits.

This course is designed to introduce graduate students to a broad range of questions, both theoretical and practical, related to curatorial practice. The core of the course is a series of sessions on curatorial strategies. Particular emphasis will be placed on integrative and collaborative approaches to curating a wide variety of material: art, film, music, books, anthropology/culture, archeology, history, geology, zoology, dance, etc. With this ideal in mind, we will bring in a series of experts to engage with each other and with the class on the theories, objectives, and processes of conceiving, designing, and mounting exhibitions, as well as reaching different audiences with both physical and virtual exhibitions. Students will also be introduced to the distinctive collections and resources on campus and in the region.

ART HIST/​CLASSICS  704 — THE ART AND ARCHAEOLOGY OF ANCIENT ROME

3 credits.

Explores the art and archaeology of ancient Italy, the Roman Republic, and the Roman Empire from the Iron Age to Late Antiquity.

ART HIST 706 — TOPICS IN AMERICAN ART HISTORY

3 credits.

This graduate-level course typically meets with an intermediate to advanced level lecture course. However, the requirements for graduate students are different, consisting of journal entries, presentations, and a substantial research paper as well as attendance and participation in the lectures. Topics vary but may include such topics as "History of American Art, 1607-present;" "American Genre;" "The Material Culture of American Suburbs;" and "Modernism in American, 1900-1960."

ART HIST 707 — TOPICS IN NINETEENTH-CENTURY EUROPEAN ART

3 credits.

This course typically meets with an intermediate to advanced level lecture courses covering specific aspects of 19th-century visual culture. Topics may include: representations of race and gender; the history of photography; popular imagery, aspects of Modernism, Realism, and Pre-Raphaelitism. However, the requirements for graduate students are different, consisting of presentations and a substantial research paper. The meets-with course is AH407 Topics in European Art.

ART HIST 712 — TOPICS IN AFRICAN & AFRICAN DIASPORA ART HISTORY

3 credits.

This course typically meets with an intermediate to advanced level lecture course. However, the requirements for graduate students are different, consisting of mentoring, longer presentations, and a substantial research paper.

ART HIST 715 — TOPICS IN MEDIEVAL ART

3 credits.

This course typically meets with an advanced undergraduate topics course that focuses on various themes of current interest in the art, architecture and visual culture of medieval Europe and the Mediterranean (including the Byzantine Empire and Islamic states of the Mediterranean rim). Topics include: Death and the Afterlife; Civic Art, Architecture and Public Space in Medieval Italy; Cultural Appropriation and Alterity in Medieval Art; and Image and Text in Medieval Manuscripts. Class alternates between lecture and discussion of current debates in the scholarly literature. Graduate students are required to write reading responses, a major research paper and give an oral presentation.

ART HIST 731 — TOPICS IN EARLY MODERN ART

3 credits.

This course encourages graduate students to think deeply and conduct innovative research on topics in Early Modern art. This course typically meets with intermediate to advanced level courses. The requirements include reading responses, a class presentation, and a final research paper. The meets-with courses include "Angels, Demons and Nudes: Early Netherlandish painting;" "Renaissances and Reformations;" "Death and Magic in Renaissance Art;" "The Artist as Scientist."

ART HIST 749 — TOPICS IN ARCHITECTURAL HISTORY

3 credits.

This graduate-level topics course typically meets with an intermediate to advanced level lecture course. However, the requirements for graduate students are different, consisting of journal entries, presentations, and a substantial research paper as well as attendance and participation in the lectures and activities. Topic varies but may include such topics as "History of American Vernacular Architecture and Landscapes;" "Frank Lloyd Wright and Modernism" "Domestic Spaces;" and "Signature Buildings in World Architecture."

ART HIST/​ANTHRO/​DS 764/​HISTORY/​LAND ARC  764 — DIMENSIONS OF MATERIAL CULTURE

4 credits.

This course introduces students to the interdisciplinary field of material culture studies. It is intended for students interested in any professional endeavor related to material culture, including careers in museums, galleries, historical societies, historic preservation organizations, and academic institutions. During the semester, students have varied opportunities to engage with and contemplate the material world to which people give meaning and which, in turn, influences their lives. Sessions combine in some way the following: presentations from faculty members and professionals who lecture on a phase of material culture related to his/her own scholarship or other professional work; discussion of foundational readings in the field; visits to collections and sites on campus and around Madison; discussion of readings assigned by visiting presenters or the professors; and exams and short papers that engage material culture topics.

ART HIST 775 — TOPICS IN JAPANESE ART HISTORY

3 credits.

This course typically meets with an intermediate to advanced level lecture course. However, the requirements for graduate students are different, consisting of journal entries, presentations, and a substantial research paper. Meets-with courses include "Arts of Japan," "Japanese Ceramics and Allied Arts," and "Art and Religious Practice in Medieval Japan."

ART HIST 776 — TOPICS IN CHINESE ART HISTORY

3 credits.

This course typically meets with an intermediate to advanced level lecture course. However, the requirements for graduate students are different, consisting of journal entries, presentations, and a substantial research paper. Meets-with courses include " Early Chinese Art: From Antiquity to the Tenth Century," "Later Chinese Art: From Tenth Century to Contemporary," and "Topics in Asian Art."

ART HIST 779 — TOPICS IN ARCHITECTURE & URBANISM OF ASIA

3 credits.

This course typically meets with an intermediate to advanced level lecture course. However, the requirements for graduate students are different consisting of a substantial research paper in addition to course assignments. Meets-with courses includes "Cities of Asia."

ART HIST 797 — CURATORIAL STUDIES INTERNSHIPS (DIRECTED STUDY)

3 credits.

This 3-credit directed study fulfills the requirement for the new graduate certificate program in Curatorial Studies, and will be specifically used to give students credit for applied learning experiences in museums and other curatorial settings. Students must identify internship possibilities and have them approved for credit by the faculty member who will serve as instructor of record, and oversee the academic side of the internship. The nature of the internship will vary according to the host institution, but to be accepted for credit, it must have a substantial research component. Examples include but are not limited to: curating an exhibition or permanent collection display; producing wall texts and object labels in an exhibition or permanent collection display; researching and writing a catalog essay or article on an object or objects in an exhibition or permanent collection; preparing catalog entries for works in the permanent collection of a museum/historical society; preparing a dossier for acquisitions; researching conservation histories of objects; preparing teaching materials associated with an exhibition or permanent collection either in print of online; participating in exhibition design; and assisting in editorial work for a museum/exhibition publication in print or online. To fulfill a 3-credit internship, the student must average approximately 12 hours a week throughout the semester, including working at the host institution on individual projects, and performing any necessary research and writing outside the host institution. In addition, the student should meet with the faculty advisor for a minimum of 1 hour each month.

ART HIST 799 — INDEPENDENT STUDY

1-6 credits.

ART HIST 800 — SEMINAR: SPECIAL TOPICS IN ART HISTORY

3 credits.

ART HIST/​AFROAMER  801 — HISTORIOGRAPHY, THEORY AND METHODS IN VISUAL CULTURE

3 credits.

Prepares student for graduate work in the transdisciplinary study of Visual Cultures by building on the knowledge, theories, and methods that are fundamental to the discipline. It will develop skills in critical reading, research, analysis, writing, and oral presentation.

ART HIST/​AFROAMER  802 — VISUAL CULTURES: TOPICS IN VISUAL CULTURES

3 credits.

Content will vary to facilitate in-depth engagement of critical facts, theories, and images in specific areas of specialization.

ART HIST 805 — SEMINAR-ANCIENT ART AND ARCHITECTURE

3 credits.

ART HIST 815 — SEMINAR-MEDIEVAL ART

3 credits.

ART HIST 825 — SEMINAR-ITALIAN RENAISSANCE ART

3 credits.

ART HIST 835 — SEMINAR-NORTHERN EUROPEAN ART

3 credits.

ART HIST 855 — SEMINAR-19TH CENTURY EUROPEAN ART

3 credits.

ART HIST 856 — GRADUATE SEMINAR IN TWENTIETH CENTURY EUROPEAN ART

3 credits.

ART HIST 863 — SEMINAR IN MATERIAL CULTURE

3 credits.

Interdisciplinary study, at the graduate level, focusing on the way people use objects and environments to express identities and relationships in households, communities, and larger social/economic systems.

ART HIST 865 — SEMINAR-AMERICAN ART

3 credits.

ART HIST 867 — SEMINAR-AMERICAN ARCHITECTURE

3 credits.

ART HIST 875 — SEMINAR IN JAPANESE ART

3 credits.

ART HIST 876 — SEMINAR IN CHINESE ART

3 credits.

ART HIST 879 — SEMINAR IN AFRICAN ART

3 credits.

Critical examination of selected theoretical and methodological issues affecting the study of African art and architecture in their historical and cultural perspectives.

ART HIST 990 — RESEARCH AND THESIS

3 credits.