AN SCI 1 — COOPERATIVE EDUCATION/CO-OP IN ANIMAL SCIENCES

1 credit.

Full-time off-campus work experience which combines classroom theory with practical knowledge of operations to provide a background upon which to base a professional career. Students receive credit only for the term in which they are actively enrolled and working. The same work experience may not count toward credit in another course.

AN SCI/​DY SCI  101 — INTRODUCTION TO ANIMAL SCIENCES

3 credits.

An overview of animal sciences covering anatomy, physiology, nutrition, reproduction, genetics, management, animal welfare, and behavior of domesticated animals. Food animals are emphasized to discuss their contributions to humans.

AN SCI/​DY SCI  102 — INTRODUCTION TO ANIMAL SCIENCES LABORATORY

1 credit.

Hands-on experience and demonstrations to develop practical skills with animals and to better understand the application of science to food production animals. It covers anatomy, physiology, nutrition, reproduction, genetics, management, animal welfare, and behavior of domesticated animals.

AN SCI 110 — ANIMAL HANDLING

1 credit.

Hands-on course that provides an understanding of livestock handling techniques, proper restraint, administering injections, and drawing blood samples. Learn about animal response to human presence and the effect of facility design on animal behavior.

AN SCI 135 — GRAND CHALLENGES AND CAREER OPPORTUNITIES IN ANIMAL AND DAIRY SCIENCES

1 credit.

Covers the current key challenges and opportunities in the broad fields of animal agriculture, animal biology, animal health, and veterinary medicine, as well as internship and career opportunities and professional development activities that will maximize the value of an undergraduate career at UW-Madison and provide preparation for post-graduation endeavors.

AN SCI 200 — THE BIOLOGY AND APPRECIATION OF COMPANION ANIMALS

3 credits.

A systematic coverage of many of the animals (including birds) that humans keep as their social companions. The classification, nutritional requirements, environmental considerations, reproductive habits, health, legal aspects and economics of companion animals and their supportive organizations.

AN SCI 240 — ANCIENT ANIMALS AND PEOPLES

3 credits.

Provides an introduction to human and animal relationships from prehistory to the present. Examines how animals have influenced social and economic structures of past societies, with a focus on the advent of domestication. Explores the cultural and economic changes that domestication has had on human societies, as well as the behavioral, genetic, and morphological changes that this process had on once wild animals. Emphasizes the methods used to retrace human-animal interactions, drawing on cross-cultural examples from anthropology, ethnozoology, archaeology, history, and genetics.

AN SCI 245 — ANIMAL WELFARE

3 credits.

Explores animal welfare topics from the animal's perspective. Analyzes contemporary welfare issues and policies based on our scientific understanding of the experiences of animals. Emphasizes farmed animals, but also draws on examples from zoo, lab, and companion animals.

AN SCI 289 — HONORS INDEPENDENT STUDY

1-2 credits.

Honors research work under direct guidance of a faculty member in an area of Animal Sciences. Students are responsible for arranging the work and credits with the supervising instructor.

AN SCI 299 — INDEPENDENT STUDY

1-3 credits.

Individual introductory to intermediate work under direct guidance of a faculty member in an area of Animal Sciences. Students are responsible for arranging the work and credits with the supervising instructor.

AN SCI/​FOOD SCI  305 — INTRODUCTION TO MEAT SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY

4 credits.

Application of biological, technological, and economical principles to muscle and related tissue utilized for food.

AN SCI/​DY SCI/​NUTR SCI  311 — COMPARATIVE ANIMAL NUTRITION

3 credits.

Nutrients and their source, assimilation, function and requirement.

AN SCI 314 — POULTRY NUTRITION

3 credits.

Provides a conceptual understanding of nutrient requirements for optimal growth and production of commercial poultry species. The use of computer programming for feed formulation is emphasized.

AN SCI 315 — POULTRY ENTERPRISE MANAGEMENT

3 credits.

Fundamental business and economic principles and practices for successful poultry production with emphasis on problem solving in flock management.

AN SCI/​DY SCI  320 — ANIMAL HEALTH AND DISEASE

3 credits.

Provides an introduction to and exploration of the interconnectivity between factors that affect health and disease and the central role of the immune system using infectious disease in animals as a key focus. Explores principal causes and identification of animal diseases, common diseases of farm animals, zoonoses and public health, disease prevention and management including biosecurity measures and host immune responses. Fosters the appreciation for the translatability and universality of knowledge between human and animal health and disease.

AN SCI/​FOOD SCI  321 — FOOD LAWS AND REGULATIONS

1 credit.

Food laws and regulations, regulatory and commerical grading standards used in the food industry.

AN SCI/​BOTANY/​MICROBIO  335 — THE MICROBIOME OF PLANTS, ANIMALS, AND HUMANS

3 credits.

Examination of the structure and function of microbial communities that live inside and on host organisms (plants, animals, and humans). Introduction to general concepts of the microbiome and microbiota, and their relationship to host nutrition, health, and disease.

AN SCI 336 — ANIMAL GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT

3 credits.

Covers growth and development of an animal from a single cell to an organism and factors such as nutrition, hormone, genetics and gut microbials influencing growth and development in both cell and tissue levels. Includes the molecular and cellular basis of prenatal and postnatal growth and development. Focuses on development and growth of tissues including muscle, adipose, connective, mammary, and bone tissues that are associated with animal production. Also includes the use of growth promotants in livestock to improve growth performance and increase the quality of carcasses and animal production.

AN SCI/​DY SCI  361 — INTRODUCTION TO ANIMAL AND VETERINARY GENETICS

2 credits.

The molecular basis for inheritance of monogenic and polygenic traits related to animal disease and production. An introduction to the principles of improving animal health and performance by selection and mating systems in companion animals, horses, livestock, and poultry.

AN SCI/​DY SCI  362 — VETERINARY GENETICS

2 credits.

The genetic basis for predisposition to diseasse or resistance to disease in livestock and companion animal species. Genetic defects, their discovery, diagnosis and treament.

AN SCI/​DY SCI  363 — PRINCIPLES OF ANIMAL BREEDING

2 credits.

Application of the principles of quantitative genetics to the improvement of livestock and poultry; breeding value estimation and selection techniques; effects of inbreeding and hybrid vigor; crossbreeding systems.

AN SCI 366 — CONCEPTS IN GENOMICS

3 credits.

Genomics has revolutionized many fields of science, including animal breeding, plant breeding, physiology, microbiology, and human medicine. A basic overview of the latest concepts in genomics, including 3D genome organization, the importance of genome annotation, the use of genomic testing in plant and animal breeding, the potential of genomic prediction on human medicine, and the latest advances in omics integration.

AN SCI/​DY SCI  370 — LIVESTOCK PRODUCTION AND HEALTH IN AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT

3 credits.

Physical, biological and social nature of animal agriculture systems and their improvement in developing countries; analysis of the state of livestock research and development in the developing countries and the world role of U.S. animal agriculture.

AN SCI/​DY SCI  373 — ANIMAL PHYSIOLOGY

3 credits.

Covers physiological processes that regulate the body and the anatomy and function of different physiological systems. Includes interactions between organ systems, analysis of a single organ system from the molecular to the organismal, and comparisons and contrasts of organ systems among different domestic animal species.

AN SCI 375 — SPECIAL TOPICS

1-4 credits.

Various topics in Animal Science of current interest to undergraduate students.

AN SCI 399 — COORDINATIVE INTERNSHIP/COOPERATIVE EDUCATION

1-8 credits.

An internship under guidance of a faculty or instructional academic staff member in Animal and Dairy Sciences and internship site supervisor. Students are responsible for arranging the work and credits with the faculty or instructional academic staff member and the internship site supervisor.

AN SCI 400 — STUDY ABROAD IN ANIMAL SCIENCES

1-6 credits.

Provides an area equivalency for courses taken on Madison Study Abroad Programs that do not equate to existing UW courses.

AN SCI/​DY SCI  414 — RUMINANT NUTRITION & METABOLISM

3 credits.

Integrates nutritional and biochemical concepts to understand digestive and metabolic processes in dairy and beef cattle, which are then quantitatively represented to predict and manipulate production and health outcomes.

AN SCI 415 — APPLICATION OF MONOGASTRIC NUTRITION PRINCIPLES

2 credits.

Nutrient requirements for growth and production of monogastric animals. Discuss concepts of establishing nutrient requirements and feeding strategies. Laboratory exercises are designed to develop problem solving skills required for the assessment of nutritional adequacy and economical soundness of feeding programs.

AN SCI 431 — BEEF CATTLE PRODUCTION

3 credits.

Application of genetics, systems of mating, physiology, nutrition and economics to the production of beef.

AN SCI 432 — SWINE PRODUCTION

3 credits.

Application of research findings in breeding, feeding, management and marketing to modernize production. Lab may include farm visits, practical exercises in testing changes, and "tools" used by producers.

AN SCI/​DY SCI  434 — REPRODUCTIVE PHYSIOLOGY

3 credits.

Principles of reproductive physiology, improvement of fertility, and artificial insemination.

AN SCI 435 — ANIMAL SCIENCES PROSEMINAR

2 credits.

Methods of assessing information quality are studied. Each student develops an analytical and critical seminar on a topic of personal interest in the animal sciences.

AN SCI/​DY SCI/​FOOD SCI/​SOIL SCI  472 — ANIMAL AGRICULTURE AND GLOBAL SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

1 credit.

Examines issues related to global agriculture and healthy sustainable development. Using a regional approach and focusing on crops and livestock case studies, students will learn the interdependence between US agriculture and agriculture in emerging economies. Some topics covered include population and food, immigration, the environment; crop and livestock agriculture; global trade; sustainability; food security, the role of women in agriculture, and the role of dairy products in a healthy diet.

AN SCI/​DY SCI/​FOOD SCI/​SOIL SCI  473 — INTERNATIONAL FIELD STUDY IN ANIMAL AGRICULTURE AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

2 credits.

Examines issues related to global agriculture and healthy sustainable development. Using a regional approach and focusing on crops and livestock case studies, students will learn the interdependence between US agriculture and agriculture in emerging economies. Some topics covered include population and food, immigration, the environment; crop and livestock agriculture; global trade; sustainability; and the role of women in agriculture and the role of dairy products in a healthy diet.

AN SCI 503 — AVIAN PHYSIOLOGY

3 credits.

Principles of organ and system function with emphasis on male and female reproduction, embryonic development and factors affecting hatchability.

AN SCI 508 — POULTRY PRODUCTS TECHNOLOGY

3 credits.

Procurement, processing and distribution of poultry meat, eggs and derived products; factors affecting quality, including methods of determining quality.

AN SCI 511 — BREEDER FLOCK AND HATCHERY MANAGEMENT

3 credits.

History of artificial incubation relevant to the U.S. hatching industry. Practices involved in successful incubation of hatching eggs. Embryonic development in birds. Management factors involved in breeder hen production and operating a hatchery.

AN SCI 512 — MANAGEMENT FOR AVIAN HEALTH

3 credits.

The occurrence, etiology, clinical signs, control and prevention of infectious and noninfectious diseases commonly affecting domestically reared poultry. Instruction in avian necropsy, zoonosis, sanitation and regulation.

AN SCI/​FOOD SCI  515 — COMMERCIAL MEAT PROCESSING

2 credits.

Principles and procedures in the commercial manufacture of processed meat products; sausage manufacturing, curing, smoking, freezing and packaging.

AN SCI/​F&W ECOL/​ZOOLOGY  520 — ORNITHOLOGY

3 credits.

Introduction to bird biology, ecology, and behavior. Topics include the evolutionary origin of birds and flight, anatomy and physiology, functional morphology, migration, communication, reproductive strategies, ecological adaptations and roles, and biogeographical patterns.

AN SCI/​F&W ECOL/​ZOOLOGY  521 — BIRDS OF SOUTHERN WISCONSIN

3 credits.

Outdoor and indoor labs/lectures emphasizing identification of southern Wisconsin birds by sight and vocalization. Two required Saturday field trips in Southern Wisconsin.

AN SCI 610 — QUANTITATIVE GENETICS

3 credits.

An advanced approach with emphasis on statistical foundations. Classical theory with extensions to maternal and paternal effects. Selection theory is considered in depth.

AN SCI/​AGRONOMY/​GENETICS/​HORT  615 — GENETIC MAPPING

3 credits.

Computing-intensive course to prepare students for genetic mapping research; linkage analysis and QTL mapping in designed crosses; linkage disequilibrium and association analysis (GWAS). Recommended preparation is undergraduate courses in genetics and statistics and prior experience writing R scripts (such as module 1 of STAT 327).

AN SCI/​NUTR SCI  626 — EXPERIMENTAL DIET DESIGN

1 credit.

Discuss nutrient requirements, composition of ingredients used to meet requirements and the mathematical steps involved in diet formulation with emphasis on research animals and human subjects.

AN SCI 681 — SENIOR HONOR THESIS

2-4 credits.

Individual study for majors completing theses for Honors degrees as arranged with a faculty member.

AN SCI 682 — SENIOR HONORS THESIS

2-4 credits.

Second semester of individual study for majors completing theses for Honors degrees as arranged with a faculty member.

AN SCI 691 — THESIS

2 credits.

Individual study for majors completing theses as arranged with a faculty member.

AN SCI 692 — THESIS

2 credits.

Second semester of individual study for majors completing theses as arranged with a faculty member.

AN SCI 699 — SPECIAL PROBLEMS

1-3 credits.

Individual advanced work in an area of Animal Sciences under the direct guidance of a faculty member.

AN SCI/​FOOD SCI  710 — CHEMISTRY OF THE FOOD LIPIDS

2 credits.

Chemical constitution, structures, reactions, stereochemistry of fats, phospholipids, related compounds; methods of isolation, characterization; synthesis; relation of structure to physical properties.

AN SCI 799 — PRACTICUM IN ANIMAL SCIENCES TEACHING

1-3 credits.

Instructional orientation to teaching at the higher education level in the agricultural and life sciences, direct teaching experience under faculty supervision, experience in testing and evaluation of students, and the analysis of teaching performance.

AN SCI/​DY SCI  824 — RUMINANT NUTRITIONAL PHYSIOLOGY I

4 credits.

Focuses on rumen microbiology, metabolite modeling, as well as protein and VFA nutrition and metabolism.

AN SCI/​DY SCI  825 — RUMINANT NUTRITIONAL PHYSIOLOGY II

4 credits.

Focuses on calf and heifer nutrition, regulation of dry matter intake, plant and forage chemistry, vitamins, lipids, and starch.

AN SCI/​GENETICS/​POP HLTH  849 — GENETIC EPIDEMIOLOGY

3 credits.

This course will provide an introduction to genetic epidemiology. Topics will include a general overview of genetics and Mendelian and complex inheritance, as well as various elements of study design, including participant ascertainment; phenotype definition; biologic sample selection; genotyping, sequencing, and quality control; measurement of covariates, and choice of analytic methods. We will briefly discuss some of the original study designs and then focus on current study designs for the remainder of the class. Additional emerging topics will be briefly touched upon. Students will complete short homework assignments to enforce concepts learned during lectures, discuss journal articles, and prepare a very short grant application for the mid-term project. In the final weeks of class, students will work together to analyze data from a real genetic study, prepare tables, interpret the findings, and present their project to their peers.

AN SCI 865 — DESIGN AND ANALYSIS OF BIOLOGICAL STUDIES

4 credits.

Experimental design and proper data analysis are critical processes for scientific research. Planning and performing research studies have statistical implications that influence how results are interpreted. Learn the fundamentals of generalized linear models, experimental design, and data analysis using common examples from biological studies.

AN SCI 875 — SPECIAL TOPICS

1-4 credits.

Specialized subject matter of current interest to graduate students.

AN SCI/​DY SCI  931 — SEMINAR IN ANIMAL NUTRITION

1 credit.

Discussion of literature that has a bearing on animal nutrition. Students are to survey the literature and present a seminar.

AN SCI/​DY SCI/​GENETICS  951 — SEMINAR IN ANIMAL BREEDING

0-1 credits.

AN SCI/​OBS&GYN/​ZOOLOGY  954 — SEMINAR IN ENDOCRINOLOGY-REPRODUCTIVE PHYSIOLOGY

0-1 credits.

Promotes scientific and professional development. Presenters develop and deliver research presentations to a scientific audience, field questions, and receive critiques about their presentation style and scientific approach. Additional presentations include professional development, career advancement opportunities, and topics of interest to the endocrinology and reproduction community at large.

AN SCI 990 — RESEARCH

1-12 credits.

Independent research in preparation of a graduate thesis under supervision of a faculty member.