CoE_electrical-engr-bs

The E C E department offers graduate studies leading to a master of science degree. The master’s program emphasizes the enhancement of professional knowledge and research techniques. 

The typical graduate course load is 8 to 12 credits per semester, which can include research credits. We encourage degree candidates to select major professors and begin research work soon after enrolling, preferably by the beginning of their second semester in residence.

The M.S. degree in Electrical Engineering is awarded for successful completion of any one of three tracks designated by the E C E department. These tracks for an M.S. degree in Electrical Engineering include preparing a thesis, completing a project report, or a course-only option.

In order to be awarded an M.S. degree in Electrical Engineering, students must adhere to department and Graduate School policies and requirements. Please refer to the Graduate Student Handbook for more information.

There are two named options offered in the Electrical Engineering M.S. in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering: Power Engineering (an online, off-campus program) and Signal Processing and Machine Learning (a 12-month accelerated program that is on campus).

An applicant must have a bachelor's degree from a regionally accredited U.S. institution or a comparable degree from an international institution. International applicants can find specific information for their country on the Graduate School Admission Requirements page. The department welcomes applications from scientific, engineering, and mathematical disciplines other than E C E.

Admission Requirements:

  • A grade point average of 3.0 (4.0 basis) is the minimum requirement for admission consideration. Applicants from an international institution must demonstrate strong academic achievement comparable to a 3.0. The Graduate School will use your institution’s grading scale. Please do not convert your grades to a 4.0 scale.
  • A submitted online application is required, consisting of:
    • your resume/CV;
    • a statement of purpose (see the guidelines provided by the Graduate School);
    • an uploaded transcript; and
    • payment of the one-time application fee of $75.
      • This fee is non-refundable. It can be paid by credit card (MasterCard or Visa) or debit/ATM card. By Wisconsin state law, this fee can only be waived or deferred through the conditions outlined by the Graduate School.  
  • Applicants must also obtain three letters of recommendation for consideration.
  • Graduate Record Exam (GRE) general test scores are required for all applicants. Please send your scores electronically via ETS to institution code 1846. UW undergraduate students, specifically those who have a B.S. degree in Electrical Engineering or Computer Engineering, may be exempt from the GRE requirement. Please inquire with the E C E Graduate Admissions Team at ecegradadmission@engr.wisc.edu.
  • Applicants whose native language is not English must provide an English proficiency score. There are a few situations in which applicants are exempt from this requirement. Please see the Graduate School’s English Proficiency Requirement, which also lists the exemptions and required method of delivery.

The application deadline for Fall is December 15 of the year prior to starting the program (ex: December 15, 2018 for Fall 2019). There are no Spring or Summer admission cycles. Only completed applications, including supportive materials, by the application deadline are guaranteed consideration. Please note that it is highly advised to take the GRE and TOEFL/IELTS tests well in advance of the deadline to ensure time for receiving and processing the scores.

If you have any admissions questions, please contact the E C E Graduate Admissions team at ecegradadmission@engr.wisc.edu.

Graduate School Admissions

Graduate admissions is a two-step process between academic degree programs and the Graduate School. Applicants must meet requirements of both the program(s) and the Graduate School. Once you have researched the graduate program(s) you are interested in, apply online.  

Graduate School Resources

Resources to help you afford graduate study might include assistantships, fellowships, traineeships, and financial aid. Further funding information is available from the Graduate School. Be sure to check with your program for individual policies and processes related to funding.

Program Resources

Financial Support

Research Assistantships
Students should contact professors in their area of interest.  Professors decide whom they will appoint on their research grants.

Teaching Assistantships
Current graduate students may apply to teaching assistantship orhourly grader positions at the E C E TA/grader portal: https://www.aims.wisc.edu/tagrader/Default.aspx Non-native English speakers are required to pass the SPEAK Test http://www.english.wisc.edu/esl/speak.htm at the English as a Second Language Program on campus. Students wishing to take the SPEAK Test should contact the E C E TA Coordinator via e-mail  to register for the exam.

Project Assistantships
There are a few project assistant opportunities on campus.  Announcements of openings are posted on TA/PA bulletin boards in Engineering Hall and on the UW Job Center Web Page.  http://www.jobcenter.wisc.edu/

Fellowships
Information concerning fellowships is sent to graduate students through email from the department, faculty, and/or the Graduate School.

Grader Positions
Current graduate students may apply to teaching assistantship or hourly grader positions at the E C E TA/grader portal:  https://www.aims.wisc.edu/tagrader/Default.aspx.

Minimum Graduate School Requirements

Review the Graduate School minimum academic progress and degree requirements, in addition to the program requirements listed below.

Major Requirements 

MODE OF INSTRUCTION

Face to Face Evening/Weekend Online Hybrid Accelerated
Yes No No No No

Mode of Instruction Definitions

CURRICULAR REQUIREMENTS

Minimum Credit Requirement 30 credits
Minimum Residence Credit Requirement 16 credits
Minimum Graduate Coursework Requirement Half of degree coursework must be completed graduate-level coursework; courses with the Graduate Level Coursework attribute are identified and searchable in the university's Course Guide.
Overall Graduate GPA Requirement 3.00 GPA required.
Other Grade Requirements 1. A grade of B or better in any graduate course is acceptable. A grade of S in E C E 790 Master's Research or Thesis, E C E 890 Pre-Dissertator's Research and E C E 990 Research or Thesis is acceptable.
2. A grade of BC in an E C E course is acceptable, provided the total cumulative GPA for graduate E C E courses is greater than or equal to 3.00.
3. A grade of C or lower in an E C E course is not acceptable.
4. A grade of BC or lower in an independent study course (E C E 699 Advanced Independent Study or E C E 999 Advanced Independent Study) or a grade of U in Research or Thesis (E C E 790, E C E 890 or E C E 990) is not acceptable.
5. A grade of BC or C in a non-E C E course is acceptable only if approved by the Graduate Committee.
6. If students are unable to complete coursework by the end of the term, an instructor may enter a temporary grade of I for incomplete. If students have not resolved all Incompletes by the end of the next fall or spring term in which they are enrolled, they are considered in bad standing by the Graduate School; however, the instructor may impose an earlier deadline. If not resolved within this time period, the grade is considered unsatisfactory and will remain an "I" unless changed to a final grade by the instructor. An unresolved I grade lapses to a grade of PI after five years. Students may be placed on probation or suspended from the Graduate School for failing to complete the work and receive a final grade in a timely fashion. Outstanding Incompletes must be resolved before a degree is granted.
Assessments and Examinations A thesis, a project, or a specified course sequence must be completed, depending upon which degree plan the student follows.
Language Requirements Non-native speakers of English who enroll in the M.S. program must take the ESLAT test on arrival at the university and then take any recommended courses based on the exam results. In addition, if a student's advisor believes that his or her technical writing ability needs improvement, the student may be required to undertake remedial work.

Required Courses

Students may select one of three tracks for completing the degree: Thesis, Project, and Course. Students in the Thesis and Project tracks have the same required coursework:

  • At least 15 must be in E C E Courses 400-level or higher, and at least 15 must be in courses numbered 700 or higher.  Only graduate courses, namely those courses listed or approved for listing in the Graduate School Bulletin are applicable for graduate credit, with the exceptions that 300-level E C E courses and E C E 702 are not acceptable. E C E 890 and E C E 990 are not applicable to the M.S. degree.
  • Of the 30 credits, a minimum of 3 and a maximum of 9 credits must be in E C E 790.  These E C E 790 credits are applicable toward both the 15 E C E credit requirement and the 700-level requirement.  The combined number of credits in E C E 790, E C E 699, and E C E 999 applied toward the degree may not exceed 9.        

Students in the Course track have the following required coursework:

  • At least 15 credits must be in E C E courses 400-level or higher, at least 15 credits must be in courses numbered 700 or higher, AND at least 9 credits must be in E C E courses numbered 700 or higher.  
  • At most, 6 credits may be in E C E 699 or E C E 999.  E C E 702, E C E 790, E C E 890, and E C E 990are not counted as part of these 30 credits.

Electrical and Computer Engineering courses:

E C E 401 Electro-Acoustical Engineering3
E C E 411 Introduction to Electric Drive Systems3
E C E 412 Power Electronic Circuits3
E C E 420 Electromagnetic Wave Transmission3
E C E 427 Electric Power Systems3
E C E 431 Digital Signal Processing3
E C E 432 Digital Signal Processing Laboratory3
E C E 434 Photonics3
E C E/​COMP SCI/​MATH  435 Introduction to Cryptography3
E C E 436 Communication Systems I3
E C E 437 Communication Systems II3
E C E/​M E  439 Introduction to Robotics3
E C E 440 Electromagnetic Fields and Waves3
E C E 445 Semiconductor Physics and Devices3
E C E 447 Applied Communications Systems3
E C E 453 Embedded Microprocessor System Design4
E C E 454 Mobile Computing Laboratory4
E C E/​B M E  461 Mathematical and Computer Modeling of Physiological Systems3
E C E/​B M E  462 Medical Instrumentation3
E C E/​B M E  463 Computers in Medicine3
E C E 466 Electronics of Solids3
E C E 489 Honors in Research1-3
E C E 491 Senior Design Project3
E C E 504 Electric Machine & Drive System Laboratory2-3
E C E/​COMP SCI  506 Software Engineering3
E C E 511 Theory and Control of Synchronous Machines3
E C E 512 Power Electronics Laboratory3
E C E/​COMP SCI/​I SY E  524 Introduction to Optimization3
E C E/​N E/​PHYSICS  525 Introduction to Plasmas3
E C E/​N E/​PHYSICS  527 Plasma Confinement and Heating3
E C E/​N E  528 Plasma Processing and Technology3
E C E/​COMP SCI/​M E  532 Matrix Methods in Machine Learning3
E C E/​COMP SCI  533 Image Processing3
E C E 536 Integrated Optics and Optoelectronics3
E C E 537 Communication Networks3
E C E/​COMP SCI/​M E  539 Introduction to Artificial Neural Network and Fuzzy Systems3
E C E 541 Analog MOS Integrated Circuit Design3
E C E 542 Introduction to Microelectromechanical Systems3
E C E/​CBE/​M S & E  544 Processing of Electronic Materials3
E C E 545 Advanced Microwave Measurements for Communications3
E C E/​PHYSICS  546 Lasers2-3
E C E 547 Advanced Communications Circuit Design3
E C E 548 Integrated Circuit Design3
E C E 549 Integrated Circuit Fabrication Laboratory3
E C E 551 Digital System Design and Synthesis3
E C E/​COMP SCI  552 Introduction to Computer Architecture3
E C E 553 Testing and Testable Design of Digital Systems3
E C E 554 Digital Engineering Laboratory4
E C E 555 Digital Circuits and Components3
E C E 556 Design Automation of Digital Systems3
E C E/​M E  577 Automatic Controls Laboratory4
E C E 600 Seminar in Electrical and Computer Engineering0
E C E 601 Special Topics in Electrical and Computer Engineering1-4
E C E 610 Seminar in Electrical and Computer Engineering1
E C E 611 Introduction to Doctoral Research in Electrical & Computer Engineering2
E C E 630 All of Signal Processing3
E C E/​MATH  641 Introduction to Error-Correcting Codes3
E C E 699 Advanced Independent Study1-6
E C E/​COMP SCI  707 Mobile and Wireless Networking3
E C E 711 Dynamics and Control of AC Drives3
E C E 712 Solid State Power Conversion3
E C E 713 Electromagnetic Design of AC Machines3
E C E 714 Utility Application of Power Electronics3
E C E 717 Linear Systems3
E C E 719 Optimal Systems3
E C E 723 On-Line Control of Power Systems3
E C E/​N E/​PHYSICS  724 Waves and Instabilities in Plasmas3
E C E/​N E/​PHYSICS  725 Plasma Kinetic Theory and Radiation Processes3
E C E/​N E/​PHYSICS  726 Plasma Magnetohydrodynamics3
E C E 729 Theory of Information Processing and Transmission3
E C E 730 Modern Probability Theory and Stochastic Processes3
E C E 731 Advanced Power System Analysis3
E C E 734 VLSI Array Structures for Digital Signal Processing3
E C E 735 Signal Synthesis and Recovery Techniques3
E C E 736 Wireless Communications3
E C E 738 Advanced Digital Image Processing3
E C E/​M E  739 Advanced Robotics3
E C E 740 Electromagnetic Theory3
E C E 741 Semiconductor Diode Lasers and other Optoelectronic Devices3
E C E 742 Computational Methods in Electromagnetics3
E C E 743 High-Power Diode Lasers and Amplifiers3
E C E 744 Theory of Microwave Circuits and Devices3
E C E 745 Solid State Electronics3
E C E/​PHYSICS  746 Quantum Electronics3
E C E/​PHYSICS  748 Linear Waves3
E C E/​N E/​PHYSICS  749 Coherent Generation and Particle Beams3
E C E/​COMP SCI  750 Real-time Computing Systems3
E C E 751 Embedded Computing Systems3
E C E/​COMP SCI  752 Advanced Computer Architecture I3
E C E 753 Fault-Tolerant Computing3
E C E/​COMP SCI  755 VLSI Systems Design3
E C E/​COMP SCI  756 Computer-Aided Design for VLSI3
E C E/​COMP SCI  757 Advanced Computer Architecture II3
E C E/​COMP SCI/​E M A/​E P/​M E  759 High Performance Computing for Applications in Engineering3
E C E/​COMP SCI  761 Mathematical Foundations of Machine Learning3
E C E/​B M E  762 Biomedical Instrumentation3
E C E/​B M E  763 Projects in Computers in Medicine3
E C E/​CBE/​MATH  777 Nonlinear Dynamics, Bifurcations and Chaos3
E C E 790 Master's Research or Thesis1-9
E C E 817 Nonlinear Systems3
E C E 821 Optimal Control and Variational Methods3
E C E 830 Estimation and Decision Theory3
E C E 841 Electromagnetic Radiation and Transmission3
E C E/​MATH  842 Topics in Applied Algebra3
E C E 845 Transport in Semiconductor Devices3
E C E/​PHYSICS  848 Nonlinear Waves3
E C E/​COMP SCI/​STAT  861 Theoretical Foundations of Machine Learning3
E C E 901 Special Topics in Electrical and Computer Engineering1-3
E C E/​N E/​PHYSICS  922 Seminar in Plasma Physics1
E C E 999 Advanced Independent Study1-3

E C E 610 Seminar in Electrical and Computer Engineering seminar requirement

All on-campus E C E graduate students must register for E C E 610 during their first semester of graduate studies.  MS-degree seeking students must take 1 credit of E C E 610 in the Fall semester of which they are entering the program. Students with a course conflict with E C E 610 can defer taking the seminar by one year provided their faculty advisor agrees.

The purpose of E C E 610 is to expose students in their first semester of graduate school to various areas within E C E and to areas outside of E C E to which E C E has or could have connections, e.g., biotechnology, physics, mathematics, business, software.  Electrical and Computer Engineering is very interdisciplinary in nature, and so it is important that students be aware of state-of-the-art research in areas other than their own.

Thesis Track1

The thesis track consists of 30 semester hours of graduate credits and approval of a master’s thesis based on independent research. Of these 30 credits, at least 15 must be in E C E courses 400 level or higher, and at least 15 must be in courses numbered 700 or higher. Only graduate courses, namely those courses listed or approved for listing in the Graduate School Bulletin are applicable for graduate credit, with the exceptions that 300-level E C E courses and E C E 702 are not acceptable. E C E 890 and E C E 990 are not applicable to the M.S. degree.

Of the 30 credits, a minimum of 3 and a maximum of 9 credits must be in E C E 790 Master's Research or Thesis.  These E C E 790 credits are applicable toward both the 15 E C E credit requirement and the 700-level requirement.  The combined number of credits in E C E 790, E C E 699, and E C E 999 Advanced Independent Study applied toward the degree may not exceed 9.  

Project Track1

The project track consists of 30 semester hours of graduate credits and approval of a  limited scope project with a prepared report. Of these 30 credits, at least 15 must be in E C E courses 400 level or higher, and at least 15 must be in courses numbered 700 or higher. Only graduate courses, namely those courses listed or approved for listing in the Graduate School Bulletin are applicable for graduate credit, with the exceptions that 300-level E C E courses and E C E 702 are not acceptable. E C E 890 and E C E 990 are not applicable to the M.S. degree.

Of the 30 credits, a minimum of 3 and a maximum of 9 credits must be in E C E 790 Master's Research or Thesis.  These E C E 790 credits are applicable toward both the 15 E C E credit requirement and the 700-level requirement.  The combined number of credits in E C E 790, E C E 699, and E C E 999 Advanced Independent Study applied toward the degree may not exceed 9.  

Course Track1

The course track consists of 30 semester hours of coursework. Of these, at least 15 credits must be in E C E courses 400 level or higher, at least 15 credits must be in courses number 700 or higher, AND at least 9 credits must be in E C E courses numbered 700 or higher. At most, 6 credits may be in E C E 699  or E C E 999. E C E 702, E C E 790, E C E 890 and E C E 990 are not counted as part of these 30 credits. No thesis or project is required. 

Footnotes

Named Options (Sub-Majors)

A named option is a formally documented sub-major within an academic major program. Named options appear on the transcript with degree conferral.

Graduate School Policies

The Graduate School’s Academic Policies and Procedures provide essential information regarding general university policies. Program authority to set degree policies beyond the minimum required by the Graduate School lies with the degree program faculty. Policies set by the academic degree program can be found below.

Major-Specific Policies

Graduate Program Handbook

The Graduate Program Handbook is the repository for all of the program's policies and requirements.

Prior Coursework

Graduate Work from Other Institutions

With program approval, students are allowed to count graduate coursework from other institutions toward the minimum graduate degree credit requirement and the minimum graduate coursework (50%) requirement. No credits from other institutions can be counted toward the minimum graduate residence credit requirement. Coursework earned five or more years prior to admission to a master’s degree is not allowed to satisfy requirements.

UW–Madison Undergraduate

With program approval, up to 7 credits numbered 400 or above can be counted toward the minimum graduate degree credit requirement. Up to 7 credits of E C E courses numbered 700 or above can be counted toward the minimum graduate coursework (50%) requirement. No credits can be counted toward the minimum graduate residence credit requirement.

UW–Madison University Special

With program approval, students are allowed to count up to 9 credits of coursework numbered 400 or above taken as a UW–Madison University Special student toward the minimum graduate residence credit requirement, and the minimum graduate degree credit requirement. Courses numbered 700 or above taken as a UW–Madison Special student toward the minimum graduate coursework (50%) requirement. Coursework earned five or more years prior to admission is not allowed to satisfy requirements.

Probation

Students must be in good academic standing with the Graduate School, their program, and their advisor. The Graduate School regularly reviews the record of any student who received grades of BC, C, D, F, or I in graduate-level courses (300 or above), or grades of U in research and thesis. This review could result in academic probation with a hold on future enrollment, and the student may be suspended from graduate studies.

The Graduate School may also put students on probation for incompletes not cleared within one term. All incomplete grades must be resolved before a degree is granted.

The status of a student can be one of three options:

  1. Good standing (progressing according to standards; any funding guarantee remains in place).
  2. Probation (not progressing according to standards but permitted to enroll; loss of funding guarantee; specific plan with dates and deadlines in place in regard to removal of probationary status.
  3. Unsatisfactory progress (not progressing according to standards; not permitted to enroll, dismissal, leave of absence or change of advisor or program).

A semester GPA below 3.0 will result in the student being placed on academic probation. If a semester GPA of 3.0 is not attained during the subsequent semester of full time) the student may be dismissed from the program or allowed to continue for 1 additional semester based on advisor appeal to the Graduate School.

ADVISOR / COMMITTEE

New students must declare an advisor by the end of the second week of classes in the first semester.

CREDITS PER TERM ALLOWED

15 credits

Time Constraints

Master’s degree students who have been absent for five or more consecutive years lose all credits that they have earned before their absence. Individual programs may count the coursework students completed prior to their absence for meeting program requirements; that coursework may not count toward Graduate School credit requirements.

Other

Funding is not guaranteed and applicants should be prepared to fund their degree. The department awards a small number of research assistantships, teaching assistantships, project assistantships, and fellowships each year. All applications are automatically considered for department funding. Students in the online Power Engineering program are not permitted to accept assistantships.

Graduate School Resources

Take advantage of the Graduate School's professional development resources to build skills, thrive academically, and launch your career. 

1. Demonstrate a strong understanding of mathematical, scientific, and engineering principles in the field.

2. Demonstrate an ability to formulate, analyze, and solve advanced engineering problems.

3. Demonstrate creative, independent problem solving skills.

4. Apply the latest scientific and technological advancements, advanced techniques, and modern engineering tools to these problems.

5. Recognize and apply principles of ethical and professional conduct.

Faculty: Professors Booske (chair), Gubner (vice-chair), Anderson, Barmish, Behdad, Boston, Botez, Davoodi, DeMarco, Farrell, Fawaz, Hagness, Hitchon, Hu, Jahns, Jiang, Jog, Kats, Kim, Knezevic, Lesieutre, Lessard, Li, Lipasti, Ludois, Ma, Mawst, Milenkovic, Nowak, Papailiopoulos, Ramanathan, Roald, San Miguel, Sayeed, Sethares, Severson, Shohet, van der Weide, Van Veen, Velten, Venkataramanan, Wendt, Willett, Yu