Administrative Unit: German, Nordic and Slavic
College/School: College of Letters & Science
Admitting Plans: M.A., Ph.D.
Degrees Offered: M.A. in German; M.A. in Scandinavian Studies; M.A, in Slavic Languages and Literatures; Ph.D. in German; Ph.D. in Scandinavian Studies; Ph.S. in Slavic Languages and Literatures
Minors and Certificates: Doctoral Minor in German; Doctoral Minor in Scandinavian Studies; Doctoral Minor in Slavic Languages and Literatures

German

The graduate program in the German is recognized internationally for its comprehensive coverage of German studies and the thorough preparation of candidates for its graduate degrees. The German program is consistently among the most highly rated in the country and is near the top of the list of North American institutions in number of total graduate degrees granted in German. Graduates teach in colleges and universities across the country and around the world, affirming the department's reputation and significance.

The department is the home of the quarterly Monatshefte, founded in 1899 and one of the leading peer-reviewed international scholarly journals in the field of German literature and culture. The Journal of Germanic Linguistics, journal of the Society for Germanic Linguistics, is also produced in the department. In addition, the department provides an editorial home for Diachronica, an international journal covering all aspects of historical and comparative linguistics. The Max Kade Institute for German-American Studies, founded in 1983, is an international center for research on German-American history, language, and culture. Its research and outreach missions aim to provide better understanding of how German-speaking immigrants to this country helped shape their new environment and how they have been shaped by it. The Center for German and European Studies (CGES), one of a handful of DAAD-sponsored centers in the US, is helping educate a new generation of experts on Germany and the new Europe across a wide variety of disciplines. It supports collaborative research and teaching of interdisciplinary and graduate seminars, and provides fellowships for graduate students interested in German and European studies.

Scandinavian Studies

Scandinavian studies is in the oldest such department in the Americas, tracing its roots to 1875. Department faculty have received numerous awards and other marks of recognition for their teaching and scholarship. The department offers the master of arts and the doctor of philosophy in Scandinavian studies. A doctoral minor is also available. Graduate students must be fluent in one Scandinavian language and specialize in one particular area, but they may expect to gain a knowledge of the wider Nordic region during their studies. The program offers the possibility to attain a broad education in Scandinavian culture that has proven to be extremely useful in students' professional careers. Students will become well-versed in theory and methodology as well as in cultural history. The department possesses particular strengths in Scandinavian literature, Old Norse philology, and Nordic folklore. Within these broader categories, students may pursue interests in such topics as, mythology, Sámi studies, saint's lives, modernism, sagas, gender criticism, immigration studies, national identity—to name only a few. Languages offered in the department include Danish, Finnish, Icelandic, Norwegian, Sámi, and Swedish. The department has an excellent record of placing its Ph.D. graduates in good positions in the field.

Slavic Languages and Literatures

Slavic languages and literature at the University of Wisconsin–Madison is a national leader of doctoral programs in the field, and welcomes students with a B.A./B.S. or M.A. who are interested in all areas of Russian and comparative Slavic prose, poetry, drama, and philosophy. The curriculum offers breadth and depth in a variety of areas of Slavic philology, literature, and culture, and is known for offering a balanced approach to training in teaching, writing, and research. The program is fortunate to count among its faculty, specialists in Czech, Polish, Russian, and Serbo-Croatian languages, literature, and culture, award-winning authors and teachers, and members of editorial boards of leading journals and publication series. Information regarding faculty biographical sketches are available on the program website. In addition to their excellence in teaching and research, professors are unparalleled mentors to graduate students. Students work closely with faculty members on writing, teaching, and publishing. Graduate students are expected to produce publishable articles during their graduate careers, and are provided the guidance and feedback to do so.

German

Faculty: Professors Vanderwal Taylor (chair), Adler, Chavez, Gross, Howell, James, Kluge, Louden, Potter, Salmons, Silberman; Associate Professors Calomino, Mani, Moedersheim; Assistant Professors Eldridge, Hollander, Klocke, Li; Faculty Associate Schueller

Scandinavian Studies

Faculty: Professors Brantly, DuBois, Leary, Wolf; Associate Professor Allen (chair); Assistant Professor Krouk

Slavic Languages and Literatures

Faculty: Professors Bethea, Danaher, Dolinin, Evans-Romaine, Filipowicz, Longinovic, van de Water; Associate Professors Reynolds, Shevelenko