grad-agriculturalappliedecon

The Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics offers graduate degree programs leading to the master of science and doctor of philosophy. Long recognized as one of the top programs in the nation, the department is an active center of research and graduate training in environmental and natural resource economics, the economic development of low-income countries, agricultural economics, community economics, and more recently, resource and energy demand analysis.

Department faculty are affiliated with a broad range of institutes and centers across the campus, including the Gaylord Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies, the Center for Integrated Agricultural Systems, the University Center for Cooperatives, the Renk Agribusiness Institute, Center for Community Economic Development, and the area studies programs. Each program has its own rich intellectual life of seminars and other activities.

The department provides office space, a lounge, and IT support for its approximately 60 graduate students. The Taylor–Hibbard Club, the department's graduate student organization, serves as a link between graduate students and the faculty, elects student representatives to department committees, and promotes academic and social activities for its members.

There are two master's degree programs in the Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics: the M.S. in Agricultural and Applied Economics (A A E) and the M.S. in Resource and Energy Demand analysis (REDA).

M.S. Named Option in AGRICULTURAL AND APPLIED ECONOMICS

The master of science includes 30 credits of coursework. This program normally takes four semesters to complete, and is ideal for students interested in careers in data analysis, government agencies, nonprofit organizations, consulting, and more. For more information please visit the A A E department website.

M.S. Named Option in RESOURCE AND ENERGY DEMAND ANALYSIS (REDA)

This one-year program is designed to prepare students for jobs in economics and data analytics for a sustainable future. Industry professionals deliver seminars about their research, supply data for classroom activities, and mentor students via research projects. Our small class size means students get plenty of individual attention from faculty and staff. The cohort nature of our program fosters peer-to-peer learning and a culture of intellectual curiosity. Completion of this fast track masters requires 31 credits and does not include a thesis. Learn more.

Students apply to either the named option (sub-major) in "Agricultural and Applied Economics" or the named option in "Resource and Energy Demand Analysis."

For details on the Agricultural and Applied Economics M.S. application process, please visit:

To Apply

For more information on the A A E M.S. degree please contact:

Mary Treleven
Graduate Program Coordinator
mtreleven@wisc.edu
Phone: 608-262-9489

Graduate School Admissions

Graduate admissions is a two-step process between academic degree programs and the Graduate School. Applicants must meet requirements of both the program(s) and the Graduate School. Once you have researched the graduate program(s) you are interested in, apply online.  

Graduate School Resources

Resources to help you afford graduate study might include assistantships, fellowships, traineeships, and financial aid. Further funding information is available from the Graduate School. Be sure to check with your program for individual policies and processes related to funding.

Program Resources

M.S. students in agricultural and applied economics students can apply for graduate positions listed under students jobs.

Students in the resource and energy demand analysis program are not permitted to accept assistantships or seek dual degrees.

Minimum Graduate School Requirements

Review the Graduate School minimum academic progress and degree requirements, in addition to the program requirements listed below.

Major Requirements 

MODE OF INSTRUCTION

Face to Face Evening/Weekend Online Hybrid Accelerated
Yes No No Yes Yes

Mode of Instruction Definitions

CURRICULAR REQUIREMENTS

Note: The major is currently non-admitting. Students are admitted through one of the named options (sub-majors) below.

Minimum Credit Requirement 30 credits
Minimum Residence Credit Requirement 16 credits
Minimum Graduate Coursework Requirement See either the M.S. named option in Agricultural and Applied Economics (https://next-guide.wisc.edu/graduate/agricultural-applied-economics/agricultural-applied-economics-ms/agricultural-applied-economics-agricultural-applied-economics-ms/#requirementstext) or the named option in Resource and Energy Demand Analysis (REDA) (https://next-guide.wisc.edu/graduate/agricultural-applied-economics/agricultural-applied-economics-ms/agricultural-applied-economics-resource-energy-demand-analysis-ms/#requirementstext) for the requirement information.
Overall Graduate GPA Requirement 3.00 GPA required.
Other Grade Requirements See either the M.S. named option in Agricultural and Applied Economics (https://next-guide.wisc.edu/graduate/agricultural-applied-economics/agricultural-applied-economics-ms/agricultural-applied-economics-agricultural-applied-economics-ms/#requirementstext) or the named option in Resource and Energy Demand Analysis (REDA) (https://next-guide.wisc.edu/graduate/agricultural-applied-economics/agricultural-applied-economics-ms/agricultural-applied-economics-resource-energy-demand-analysis-ms/#requirementstext) for the requirement information.
Assessments and Examinations See either the M.S. named option in Agricultural and Applied Economics (https://next-guide.wisc.edu/graduate/agricultural-applied-economics/agricultural-applied-economics-ms/agricultural-applied-economics-agricultural-applied-economics-ms/#requirementstext) or the named option in Resource and Energy Demand Analysis (REDA) (https://next-guide.wisc.edu/graduate/agricultural-applied-economics/agricultural-applied-economics-ms/agricultural-applied-economics-resource-energy-demand-analysis-ms/#requirementstext) for the requirement information.
Language Requirements No language requirements.

Required Courses

Select a named option for courses required.

Named Options (Sub-Majors)

A named option is a formally documented sub-major within an academic major program. Named options appear on the transcript with degree conferral. Students pursuing the Master of Science in Agricultural and Applied Economics must select one of the following named options:

Graduate School Policies

The Graduate School’s Academic Policies and Procedures provide essential information regarding general university policies. Program authority to set degree policies beyond the minimum required by the Graduate School lies with the degree program faculty. Policies set by the academic degree program can be found below.

Major-Specific Policies

Graduate Program Handbook

The Graduate Program Handbook is the repository for all of the program's policies and requirements. See the handbook for the named option in Agricultural and Applied Economics here, and for the named option in Resource and Energy Demand Analysis here.

Prior Coursework

Graduate Work from Other Institutions

With program approval, students are allowed to count no more than 6 credits of graduate coursework from other institutions. Coursework earned five or more years prior to admission to a master's degree is not allowed to satisfy requirements.

UW–Madison Undergraduate

Up to 7 credits from a UW–Madison undergraduate degree numbered 300 or above are allowed to count toward the degree, with petition from student. Coursework earned five or more years prior to admission to a master's degree is not allowed to satisfy requirements.

UW–Madison University Special

See either the M.S. named option in Agricultural and Applied Economics (https://next-guide.wisc.edu/graduate/agricultural-applied-economics/agricultural-applied-economics-ms/agricultural-applied-economics-agricultural-applied-economics-ms/#policiestext) or the named option in Resource and Energy Demand Analysis (REDA) (https://next-guide.wisc.edu/graduate/agricultural-applied-economics/agricultural-applied-economics-ms/agricultural-applied-economics-resource-energy-demand-analysis-ms/#policiestext) for the policy information.

Probation

The Graduate School regularly reviews the record of any student who earned grades of BC, C, D, F, or Incomplete in a graduate course (300 or above), or grade of U in research credits. This review could result in academic probation with a hold on future enrollment or in being suspended from the Graduate School.

ADVISOR / COMMITTEE

See either the M.S. named option in Agricultural and Applied Economics (https://next-guide.wisc.edu/graduate/agricultural-applied-economics/agricultural-applied-economics-ms/agricultural-applied-economics-agricultural-applied-economics-ms/#policiestext) or the named option in Resource and Energy Demand Analysis (REDA) (https://next-guide.wisc.edu/graduate/agricultural-applied-economics/agricultural-applied-economics-ms/agricultural-applied-economics-resource-energy-demand-analysis-ms/#policiestext) for the policy information.

CREDITS PER TERM ALLOWED

15 credits

Time Constraints

Master's degree students who have been absent for five or more consecutive years lose all credits that they have earned before their absence. Individual programs may count the coursework students completed prior to their absence for meeting program requirements; that coursework may not count toward Graduate School credit requirements.

Other

Students in the Resource and Energy Demand Analysis program are not permitted to accept assistantships or seek dual or double degrees.

Graduate School Resources

Take advantage of the Graduate School's professional development resources to build skills, thrive academically, and launch your career. 

1. Articulates and critiques theories and empirical methods for quantitative analysis relevant to agricultural, environmental, international development, or community economics.

2. Identifies data sources, applies appropriate econometric methodologies, and evaluates quantitative evidence relevant to questions in agricultural, environmental, international development, or community economics.

3. Clearly communicates applied economics issues, methods, and empirical analysis using both written and oral strategies.

4. Recognizes and applies principles of ethical, collegial and professional conduct.

Faculty: Professors Foltz (chair), Barham, Chavas, Coxhead, Deller, Gould, Mitchell, Phaneuf, Provencher, Rutherford, Stiegert; Associate Professors Alix-Garcia, Du, Grainger, Hueth, Schechter, Shi; Assistant Professors Conroy, Dower, Parker, Tjernström; Faculty Associate Dong

Lecturers: Beardmore, Glinsmann