AFRICAN 100 — INTRODUCTION TO AFRICAN CULTURAL EXPRESSION

3 credits.

An introduction to current research in African cultural studies, ranging from various literary genres and uses of discourse; to diverse media including screen media, music, cartoons, and journalism; and to other forms of popular expression like soccer and drama. Through an introduction to these forms, students will also gain an overview of the diverse methods used by scholars in this field, such as textual analysis, film criticism, ethnomusicology, discourse analysis, and ethnography; and to the cultural diversity of Africa and its diasporic cultures.

AFRICAN/​HISTORY  129 — AFRICA ON THE GLOBAL STAGE

3-4 credits.

Explores the interplay between Africa and the World from the 19th century to the present, covering subjects such as the slave- trade, repatriation, Africanizing of culture in the Americas and Europe, the spread and revival of world religions, colonialism, global capitalism, the rise of global popular culture such as pop music and video films, environmental concerns and global epidemics.

AFRICAN 201 — INTRODUCTION TO AFRICAN LITERATURE

3 credits.

Survey of African literary traditions and introduction to literary analysis.

AFRICAN/​FOLKLORE  210 — THE AFRICAN STORYTELLER

3 credits.

The oral tradition and the written word; the composition of stories, relationship between performer and audience, and transmission of tradition in various African societies.

AFRICAN 211 — THE AFRICAN AUTOBIOGRAPHY

3 credits.

The importance of autobiography in depicting social change in the lives of Africans.

AFRICAN 212 — INTRODUCTION TO AFRICAN POPULAR CULTURE

3-4 credits.

This course will use aspects of popular culture (such as popular literature, music, television, news media, movies, etc.) to introduce students to the African continent and its cultures, people, and anguages. Students will be exposed to a variety of texts from different regions on the continent, learning about differences and similarities across the continent at the level of aesthetics and context.

AFRICAN/​AFROAMER  220 — HIPHOP, YOUTH CULTURE, AND POLITICS IN SENEGAL

3 credits.

This course explores how HipHop, a quintessential manifestation of African American culture, is adopted and adapted by African youth to fight for social justice and democracy in their local contexts, while at the same time constructing a diasporic African sensibility and "cultural citizenship" that transcends boarders and oceans. Beginning with the history, culture, and politics of HipHop in the U.S., we compare and contrast HipHop's development in Africa with specific attention to Senegal. Students will develop a familiarity with youth culture and politics in Senegal and study the ongoing process of cross-cultural flows and hybridity.

AFRICAN 230 — INTRODUCTION TO YORUBA LIFE AND CULTURE

3 credits.

Introduction to some aspects of the life and culture of Yoruba-speaking people of West Africa, Cuba, Brazil, and Haiti, including the importance of Yoruba culture in the Americas.

AFRICAN 231 — INTRODUCTION TO ARABIC LITERARY CULTURE

3 credits.

Survey course on Arabic cultural production. Through the course, students will develop a historic and critical understanding of Arabic literary traditions, as well as related musical and visual arts, up to the twenty-first century.

AFRICAN 232 — INTRODUCTION TO SWAHILI CULTURES

3 credits.

A multi-disciplinary perspective on the identities, history, language, literature, and artistic heritage of Swahili speakers.

AFRICAN/​AFROAMER  233 — GLOBAL HIPHOP AND SOCIAL JUSTICE

3 credits.

Can HipHop culture help produce a more just world? If so, what theory and praxis best advance this aim? These are the questions that drive this conceptual course. Our critical interrogation of the relationship between HipHop and social justice considers the culture from its U.S. Black Power era underpinnings to its disparate contemporary "glocal" manifestations. We begin by asking what is "HipHop," what is "social justice," and what is their relationship, and proceed to consider how HipHop can be an effective force for social justice and what obstacles mitigate against this potential. These discussions will develop familiarity with important concepts in Black studies and social theory such as race and colonialism, imperialism and hegemony, structure and agency, identity and strategic essentialism. Weekly readings will typically pair writings specifically on HipHop with theory from across the humanities and social sciences including philosophy, sociology, cultural studies, and political economy. We will endeavor to consider the race/class/gender dimensions of our weekly topics. Students will acquire a broader familiarity with HipHop activism, and develop new conceptual tools and critical thinking skills.

AFRICAN/​FOLKLORE  270 — THE HERO AND TRICKSTER IN AFRICAN ORAL TRADITIONS

3 credits.

Two major characters in African oral tradition as treated in narrative, epic and heroic poetry.

AFRICAN/​AFROAMER/​ANTHRO/​GEOG/​HISTORY/​POLI SCI/​SOC  277 — AFRICA: AN INTRODUCTORY SURVEY

4 credits.

African society and culture, polity and economy in multidisciplinary perspectives from prehistory and ancient kingdoms through the colonial period to contemporary developments, including modern nationalism, economic development and changing social structure.

AFRICAN/​AFROAMER/​HISTORY/​POLI SCI  297 — AFRICAN AND AFRICAN-AMERICAN LINKAGES: AN INTRODUCTION

4 credits.

Analysis of retention of African elements in African-American oral, written, and material culture. Social, cultural, and political issues regarding race, self-definition, and self-determination in both Africa and North America will be examined.

AFRICAN 300 — AFRICAN LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION

3 credits.

Introduction to the literature, oral or written, of a coherent cultural area of Africa, for those for whom texts in the original language are not accessible. Not recommended for grad stdts

AFRICAN 301 — INTRODUCTION TO AFRICAN LINGUISTICS

3 credits.

African languages, including typology, comparative studies, sociolinguistic factors, and the relation of language to literature.

AFRICAN 303 — AFRICAN LITERATURE AND VISUAL CULTURE

3 credits.

An introduction to literature and visual culture of Africa in various periods and places; specific topics will vary.

AFRICAN/​LCA LANG  321 — FIRST SEMESTER ARABIC

4-5 credits.

An important Afro-Asiatic language; description, drills, reading, speaking. Open to Fr

AFRICAN/​LCA LANG  322 — SECOND SEMESTER ARABIC

4-5 credits.

Continuation of 321. 4 credits for Grads, 5 credits for Undergrads (4 cr only Summer). Open to Freshmen

AFRICAN/​LCA LANG  323 — THIRD SEMESTER ARABIC

4 credits.

Advanced grammar and conversational practice, reading contemporary Arabic literature and other writings.

AFRICAN/​LCA LANG  324 — FOURTH SEMESTER ARABIC

4 credits.

Continuation of 323.

AFRICAN 325 — COLLOQUIAL ARABIC

2 credits.

AFRICAN 326 — COLLOQUIAL ARABIC

2 credits.

AFRICAN/​LCA LANG  327 — ELEMENTARY SUMMER IMMERSION ARABIC

8 credits.

Elementary level Arabic language taught in an 8-week residential summer language immersion format. Open only to students who have been admitted separately to the summer Arabic immersion program.

AFRICAN 329 — FIFTH SEMESTER ARABIC

3 credits.

For advanced learners of Modern Standard Arabic; emphasis on proficiency through speaking, listening, reading, and writing, and on communication in cultural context.

AFRICAN 330 — SIXTH SEMESTER ARABIC

3 credits.

For advanced learners of Modern Standard Arabic; emphasis on proficiency through speaking, listening, reading, and writing, and on communication in cultural context.

AFRICAN 331 — FIRST SEMESTER SWAHILI

5 credits.

For beginning learners of Standard Swahili; emphasis on proficiency through speaking, listening, reading, and writing, and on communication in cultural context.

AFRICAN 332 — SECOND SEMESTER SWAHILI

4-5 credits.

Continuation of 331. 4 credit for Grads, 5 credit for Undergrads (4 cr only Summer). Open to Freshmen

AFRICAN 333 — THIRD SEMESTER SWAHILI

4 credits.

Continuation of AFRICAN 332. Four-skills approach (speaking, listening, writing, reading) centered around authentic texts, recordings, and images. Grammar review, concerted vocabulary expansion, and intensive practice.

AFRICAN 334 — FOURTH SEMESTER SWAHILI

4 credits.

Continuation of 333.

AFRICAN 335 — FIRST SEMESTER-A LANGUAGE OF SOUTHERN AFRICA

5 credits.

For beginning learners of a Southern African language; emphasis on proficiency through speaking, listening, reading, and writing, and on communication in cultural context.

AFRICAN 336 — SECOND SEMESTER-A LANGUAGE OF SOUTHERN AFRICA

4-5 credits.

Continuation of 335. 4 cr for Grads, 4 cr for Undergrads (4 cr only Summer). Open to Fr

AFRICAN 337 — THIRD SEMESTER-A LANGUAGE OF SOUTHERN AFRICA

4 credits.

Continuation of 336; More advanced speaking knowledge and grammatical analysis. Structure, reading, drills.

AFRICAN 338 — FOURTH SEMESTER-A LANGUAGE OF SOUTHERN AFRICA

4 credits.

Continuation of 337.

AFRICAN 353 — THIRD SEMESTER XHOSA

4 credits.

More advanced texts and emphasis on structural analysis and conversational practice.

AFRICAN 354 — FOURTH SEMESTER XHOSA

4 credits.

Continuation of 353.

AFRICAN 361 — FIRST SEMESTER HAUSA

5 credits.

For beginning learners of Hausa; emphasis on proficiency through speaking, listening, reading, and writing, and on communication in cultural context.

AFRICAN 362 — SECOND SEMESTER HAUSA

4-5 credits.

Continuation of 361. 4 cr for Grads, 5 cr for Undergrads (4 cr only Summer). Open to Fr

AFRICAN/​LCA/​RELIG ST  370 — ISLAM: RELIGION AND CULTURE

3-4 credits.

The emergence and development of Islam; schism; theology; asceticism; speculative and popular mysticism; literatures in diverse Islamic languages.

AFRICAN 371 — FIRST SEMESTER YORUBA

5 credits.

For beginning learners of Standard Yoruba; emphasis on proficiency through speaking, listening, reading, and writing, and on communication in cultural context.

AFRICAN 372 — SECOND SEMESTER YORUBA

5 credits.

Continuation of AFRICAN 371. For beginning learners of standard Yoruba; emphasis on proficiency through speaking, listening, reading, and writing, and on communication in cultural context.

AFRICAN 373 — THIRD SEMESTER YORUBA

4 credits.

Advanced grammar and conversational practice. Reading contemporary Yoruba literature and other writings.

AFRICAN 374 — FOURTH SEMESTER YORUBA

4 credits.

Continuation of AFRICAN 373, intended to continue to develop and refine competence and performance in linguistic skills that were developed in the first three semesters of Yoruba courses.

AFRICAN 391 — FIRST SEMESTER-A LANGUAGE OF WEST AFRICA

4-5 credits.

e.g. Ewe, Igbo, Mende, Twi, Yoruba: Speaking knowledge, description, structure, drills. Open to Fr

AFRICAN 392 — SECOND SEMESTER-A LANGUAGE OF WEST AFRICA

4-5 credits.

Continuation of 391. 4 cr for Grads, 5 cr for Undergrads (4 cr only Summer). Open to Fr

AFRICAN 393 — THIRD SEMESTER-A LANGUAGE OF WEST AFRICA

4 credits.

Continuation of 391 and 392.

AFRICAN 394 — FOURTH SEMESTER-A LANGUAGE OF WEST AFRICA

4 credits.

Continuation of 393.

AFRICAN 399 — DIRECTED STUDY OF AN AFRICAN LANGUAGE

3 credits.

Directed language study for students experienced in language self instruction. The instructor will continue to consult with the student and monitor progress.

AFRICAN 402 — THEORY OF AFRICAN LITERATURE

3-4 credits.

Approaches to the analysis of African oral narrative performances, heroic poetry, epic, and the genres of written literature: Aesthetic, symbolic, and structural analysis and their interrelationships.

AFRICAN 403 — THEORIES OF AFRICAN CULTURAL STUDIES

3 credits.

This course is a study of the many ways of understanding the entire spectrum of culture and cultural production, circulation, consumption, and meaning making in Africa. It foregrounds material and imaginative cultural forms and practices-their origins, languages, contents, forms, functions, genres, audiences-as well as how these have been conceived and theorized by practitioners and scholars in the context of Africa and the world. The course will also examine the uses to which particular meanings of culture and its forms are put, by whom, and to what purpose, and how meanings are fought over, reshaped, and reconstituted, and under what conditions those are or can be possible. This is what "theory of African cultural studies" means in its most robust and imaginative senses. We will survey the entrenched modes of both conceptual and critical apprehension of the cultural forms and practices (from Negritude to postcolonialism and postmodernism), explore their methods of reading, raise the issue of their linkages to sources in Euro-America, and assess the extent to which the unique concerns of the biography of culture in Africa (expressed by its creators and scholars) have tried to tame and refashion what are now globally shared critical tools of cultural reading.

AFRICAN 405 — TOPICS IN AFRICAN CULTURAL STUDIES

3 credits.

This course examines various mediated cultural forms such as broadcasting, news, performance, music, film, or social media created and used and across regions and countries in Africa, addressing issues such as cultural identity, nation building, constraints on expression, access, and reception, and the interaction of global and African cultural forms.

AFRICAN 406 — TOPICS IN AFRICAN LITERATURE

3 credits.

Provides a conceptual focus for the study of various forms of literature from around the African world. Literary forms studied may include novels, drama, poetry, short stories, cinema, and more. Depending on the conceptual focus, texts from a particular region, period, or language may be stressed, or they will coalesce around certain themes, such as modernity, cultural identity, nation building, ideology, globalization, and more.

AFRICAN 407 — TOPICS IN AFRICAN LANGUAGES

3 credits.

Topics in African languages, especially sociocultural linguistics and critical applied linguistics in Africa.

AFRICAN 409 — TOPICS IN US AND GLOBAL BLACK MUSIC STUDIES

3 credits.

This course will introduce students to the phenomenon of "musical blackness" as a US-based, transnational cultural form and practice. In each class (topics will vary), students will learn about how US-based, racially specified black musical forms, together with global forms also identified as "black," were constituted as part of the legacies of European colonial encounter and US imperial expansion; the categories of "traditional" music and popular style took shape and have been experienced as something part and parcel of this historical process. By giving close consideration to genre, style, and performance practice, the course will help students to understand the many ways in which musical sound and social/political ideas are inextricably linked.

AFRICAN/​FOLKLORE  411 — AFRICAN POETRY

3-4 credits.

Analysis of oral and written poetry from various African cultures.

AFRICAN 412 — CONTEMPORARY AFRICAN FICTION

3-4 credits.

A critical study of the major works.

AFRICAN/​AFROAMER  413 — CONTEMPORARY AFRICAN AND CARIBBEAN DRAMA

3-4 credits.

A critical study of the major works.

AFRICAN/​LCA LANG  427 — INTERMEDIATE SUMMER IMMERSION ARABIC

8 credits.

Intermediate level Arabic language taught in an 8-week residential summer language immersion format. Open only to students who have been admitted separately to the summer Arabic immersion program. Students must be admitted to the summer Arabic immersion program in order to enroll

AFRICAN 435 — ADVANCED STUDIES IN SWAHILI LANGUAGE-GRAMMAR

3 credits.

Reading, conversation and composition beyond the fourth semester level with emphasis on linguistic structure and the grammatical analysis of texts appropriate to the level of the student.

AFRICAN 436 — ADVANCED STUDIES IN SWAHILI LANGUAGE-READINGS

3 credits.

Reading, conversation and composition beyond the fourth semester level with emphasis on the literary tradition of the language and concentration on texts appropriate to the level of the student.

AFRICAN/​FRENCH  440 — AFRICAN/FRANCOPHONE FILM

3 credits.

Studies the construction of narratives in cinema and literature; teaches to analyze and write about cinema; explores links between cinema and national or regional politics and ideology; examines spectatorship in relation to questions of identity formation.

AFRICAN/​LCA LANG  445 — READINGS IN ADVANCED ARABIC TEXTS

3 credits.

Selection from Quranic and post-Quranic Arabic texts to meet the needs of the students.

AFRICAN/​LCA LANG  446 — READINGS IN ADVANCED ARABIC TEXTS

3 credits.

AFRICAN/​PORTUG  451 — LUSOPHONE AFRICAN LITERATURE

3 credits.

Chronological and thematic survey of major trends, authors, and works of Lusophone Africa since 1936.

AFRICAN 453 — MODERN AFRICAN LITERATURE IN ENGLISH

3-4 credits.

Chief emphasis on modern African poetry, novel, drama, and short story.

AFRICAN/​FOLKLORE  471 — ORAL TRADITIONS AND THE WRITTEN WORD

3-4 credits.

Analyses and comparisons of African oral narrative-performances and African written literatures.

AFRICAN 475 — FIFTH SEMESTER YORUBA

3 credits.

Advanced linguistic structures, literature and poetry. Introduction to Yoruba cultures in the works of Wole Soyinka.

AFRICAN 476 — SIXTH SEMESTER YORUBA

3 credits.

More complex linguistic structure. Proverbs. Yoruba cultural background in the works of Wole Soyinka.

AFRICAN 491 — FIFTH SEMESTER, A LANGUAGE OF CENTRAL AFRICA

3 credits.

Advanced linguistic structures and literature.

AFRICAN 493 — FIFTH SEMESTER, A LANGUAGE OF SOUTHERN AFRICA

3 credits.

Advanced linguistic structures and literature.

AFRICAN 494 — SIXTH SEMESTER, A LANGUAGE OF SOUTHERN AFRICA

3 credits.

Advanced linguistic structures and literature.

AFRICAN 495 — FIFTH SEMESTER, A LANGUAGE OF NORTHERN AFRICA

3 credits.

Advanced linguistic structures and literature.

AFRICAN 496 — SIXTH SEMESTER, A LANGUAGE OF NORTHERN AFRICA

3 credits.

Advanced linguistic structures and literature.

AFRICAN 497 — FIFTH SEMESTER, A LANGUAGE OF WEST AFRICA

3 credits.

Advanced linguistic structures and literature.

AFRICAN 498 — SIXTH SEMESTER, A LANGUAGE OF WEST AFRICA

3 credits.

Advanced linguistic structure and literature.

AFRICAN 500 — LANGUAGE AND SOCIETY IN AFRICA

3-4 credits.

Language use in African societies; multilingualism; language in politics, religion, socialization.

AFRICAN 501 — STRUCTURE AND ANALYSIS OF AFRICAN LANGUAGES

3-4 credits.

Emphasis on phonetics (including transcription), and on theories and problems of phonology, morphology, and syntax.

AFRICAN 503 — AFRICAN LINGUISTIC STRUCTURES-MORPHOLOGY AND SYNTAX

3-4 credits.

Morphological and syntactic characteristics of various African languages, with emphasis on noun-class systems, pluralization, verbal systems and word formation.

AFRICAN/​LCA LANG  527 — ADVANCED SUMMER IMMERSION ARABIC

8 credits.

Advanced level Arabic language taught in an 8-week residential summer language immersion format. Open only to students who have been admitted separately to the summer Arabic immersion program. Students must be admitted to the summer Arabic immersion program in order to enroll. A placement test may be required for admission

AFRICAN 605 — ADVANCED TOPICS IN AFRICAN CULTURAL STUDIES

3 credits.

This course will introduce students to foundational texts in the study of modern Africa and the social, political, and economic contexts of the continent's cultural production and productivity. We will organize our conceptual explorations around such interesting issues as the African encounter with Europe, anticolonialism, race, racialism, and subjectivity, African and European languages and epistemology, transformations in gendered structures, and the environment, and the circulation and consumption of cultural forms and practices. This course will encourage students to think about the long histories and theories of cultural production and practices in Africa, the local/global provenance of forms and styles, and the contexts of their local, national, and global circulation and consumption. The course will promote critical thinking by challenging students to put like and unlike texts together and pay attention to rhetoric and implied meanings, all in the context of Africa's interactive history with the world in the modern era.

AFRICAN 606 — ADVANCED TOPICS IN AFRICAN LITERATURE

3 credits.

A critical and historical study of selected topics in African literary studies.

AFRICAN 609 — ADVANCED TOPICS IN GLOBAL BLACK MUSIC STUDIES

3 credits.

This course will examine key critical concepts in the cultural study of racially specified "black music" as it has developed as a global phenomenon. Typically organized as a seminar, the course will pair major theories in black cultural analysis (postcolonial criticism, diaspora theory, global capitalism, etc.) with a body of literature pertaining to a particular musical topic, geographic area, or tradition. This pairing will provide the means by which students will develop critical skills for undertaking cultural music analysis. Throughout the semester, students will be encouraged to think about the long histories and theories of cultural production and practices in global Africa, the local/global provenance of forms and styles, and the contexts of their local, national, and global circulation and consumption.

AFRICAN 669 — SPECIAL TOPICS

3 credits.

AFRICAN 670 — THEORIES AND METHODS OF LEARNING A LESS COMMONLY TAUGHT LANGUAGE

2 credits.

A theoretical and practical exploration of second language acquisition (SLA) and self-instructional methods. Each student will test and/or modify one or more theories/methods by putting these self-instructional methods into practice in order to learn a less commonly taught language (LCTL). Intended for those with prior experience in the study of African languages, or advanced study of other foreign languages.

AFRICAN 671 — MULTILANGUAGE SEMINAR

4 credits.

Through weekly meetings, students discuss their use of self-instructional methods to learn a less commonly taught language (LCTL), get feedback on individualized syllabi and assessment plans, and present progress reports orally and in writing. Homework includes continuous self-instruction in the chosen LCTL including reading, writing, oral, and listening skills; work with a conversation partner; and cultural knowledge.

AFRICAN 681 — SENIOR HONORS THESIS

3 credits.

AFRICAN 682 — SENIOR HONORS THESIS

3 credits.

AFRICAN 697 — DIRECTED STUDY OF A LESS COMMONLY TAUGHT LANGUAGE

3-5 credits.

Monitored self-instruction of a less commonly taught language. Students will meet individually with the instructor. Requires development of an individualized study plan, bibliographic and online research, work with conversation partners online or in the community, and regular self-assessments.

AFRICAN 698 — DIRECTED STUDY

1-6 credits.

AFRICAN 699 — DIRECTED STUDY

1-6 credits.

AFRICAN 700 — READING AND WRITING AFRICAN CULTURAL STUDIES

3 credits.

This is a course on academic writing, designed to guide graduate students toward a full understanding of the craft of marshaling evidence to support an argument in the humanities, particularly African cultural studies. It covers the norms and expectations that inhere in academic writing as well as the mechanics of producing original scholarship.

AFRICAN 701 — ADVANCED TOPICS IN AFRICAN LINGUISTICS

3 credits.

Advanced study of a topic in African linguistics. Content will vary with each offering.

AFRICAN 702 — AFRICAN VERBAL STYLISTICS

3 credits.

Linguistic approaches to the vrbl arts of Africa, oral, written, and in performance.

AFRICAN 703 — TOPICS IN TEACHING AFRICAN LANGUAGES

1 credit.

Theories and teaching methodologies for second language acquisition plus practical classroom techniques for teaching and directing programs in African languages.

AFRICAN 704 — TOPICS IN AFRICAN CULTURAL STUDIES PEDAGOGY

1 credit.

This course is an exploration of key thematics in the teaching and understanding of African cultural studies. It is organized centrally around methodology and pedagogy: what is, how we know, name, and categorize; and how we teach, analyze, and communicate.

AFRICAN 705 — TEACHING PORTFOLIO

2 credits.

This course will develop graduate students' metacognitive skills and critical thinking about teaching as a scholarly activity, through the creation of a teaching portfolio that documents the ideas and objectives that have informed their teaching to date and potential future teaching. Designed for students who teach foreign languages but open to graduate students in other humanities disciplines.

AFRICAN 796 — TEACHING APPRENTICESHIP

3 credits.

Observation and discussion of undergraduate culture course. Consideration of pedagogical issues and limited opportunity for practice teaching.

AFRICAN 802 — THEORY AND CRITICISM OF AFRICAN LITERATURE

3 credits.

Through a wide range of theoretical texts, students will be trained to reflect critically on the ongoing conversation about cultural production and literary criticism in the context of African studies.

AFRICAN 803 — THEORIES OF AFRICAN CULTURAL STUDIES

3 credits.

This course is a study of the many ways of understanding the entire spectrum of culture and cultural production, circulation, consumption, and meaning making in Africa. It foregrounds material and imaginative cultural forms and practices-their origins, languages, contents, forms, functions, genres, audiences-as well as how these have been conceived and theorized by practitioners and scholars in the context of Africa and the world. The course will also examine the uses to which particular meanings of culture and its forms are put, by whom, and to what purpose, and how meanings are fought over, reshaped, and reconstituted, and under what conditions those are or can be possible. This is what "theory of African cultural studies" means in its most robust and imaginative senses. We will survey the entrenched modes of both conceptual and critical apprehension of the cultural forms and practices (from Negritude to postcolonialism and postmodernism), explore their methods of reading, raise the issue of their linkages to sources in Euro-America, and assess the extent to which the unique concerns of the biography of culture in Africa (expressed by its creators and scholars) have tried to tame and refashion what are now globally shared critical tools of cultural reading.

AFRICAN/​AFROAMER  813 — CONTEMPORARY AFRICAN AND CARIBBEAN DRAMA

3 credits.

Historical and critical study of the classics of contemporary African and Caribbean literary drama written in English. We will organize our survey around such interesting thematic issues as the African encounter with Europe, postcolonial disillusionment and the betrayal of ideals, and also stylistic matters as the relationship(s) between traditional drama and other performance forms, and modern drama written in European languages. We will also read theories and critical approaches to understanding the cross-continental drama traditions and their contexts.This course will encourage students to think about the long histories of cultural, performance, and theatrical relationships between Africa and the Caribbean and how the relationships have been shaped by race and economics, past and present. The course will promote critical thinking by challenging students to question conventional claims made by others and their own assumptions; it will invite students to think through the perspectives of others with empathy and respect, and stimulate analytical thinking about identity. Writers to be studied include Wole Soyinka, Derek Walcott, Aime Cesaire, Ama Ata Aidoo, Femi Osofisan, Sindiwe Magona, Mustapha Matura, and the Sistren Theatre Collective.

AFRICAN 901 — SEMINAR IN MODERN AFRICAN LITERATURE

3 credits.

Special topics.

AFRICAN 902 — SEMINAR IN TRADITIONAL AFRICAN LIT

3 credits.

Topics in oral art forms.

AFRICAN 903 — SEMINAR IN AFRICAN LINGUISTICS

3 credits.

AFRICAN 905 — SEMINAR IN AFRICAN CULTURAL STUDIES: TOPICS

3 credits.

This seminar examines various mediated cultural forms such as broadcasting, news, performance, music, film, or social media created and used and across regions and countries in Africa, addressing issues such as cultural identity, nation building, constraints on expression, access, and reception, and the interaction of global and African cultural forms.

AFRICAN 926 — SEMINAR IN RESEARCH METHODS IN AFRICAN CULTURAL STUDIES

3 credits.

Field methods, techniques, and analytical approaches for students doing research in African cultural studies. Topics vary but may include ethnography, narrative analysis, critical discourse analysis, and other research methods.

AFRICAN 935 — SEMINAR IN SOUTH AFRICAN ORAL & WRITTEN LITERATURES

3 credits.

One or more problems.

AFRICAN 955 — SEMINAR IN AFRICAN MYTHOLOGY

3 credits.

AFRICAN/​ANTHRO/​ECON/​GEOG/​HISTORY/​POLI SCI  983 — INTERDEPARTMENTAL SEMINAR-AFRICAN STUDIES

3 credits.

Interdisciplinary inquiry in African society and culture.

AFRICAN 990 — THESIS

1-9 credits.

AFRICAN 999 — INDEPENDENT READING AND RESEARCH

1-3 credits.