HISTORY 101 — AMER HIST TO THE CIVIL WAR ERA, THE ORIGIN & GROWTH OF THE U S

4 credits.

American political, economic, and social development from the founding of the colonies to the Civil War.

HISTORY 102 — AMERICAN HISTORY, CIVIL WAR ERA TO THE PRESENT

4 credits.

American political, economic and social development from the Civil War to the present.

HISTORY/​E A STDS  103 — INTRODUCTION TO EAST ASIAN HISTORY: CHINA

3-4 credits.

Survey of major developments in Chinese history from 1500 B.C. to the founding of the Communist state in 1949. Emphasis on patterns and themes; equal time devoted to the classical and traditional period and the modern era.

HISTORY/​E A STDS  104 — INTRODUCTION TO EAST ASIAN HISTORY: JAPAN

3-4 credits.

Survey of major cultural, social, political and economic developments in Japanese history from ancient to recent times.

HISTORY 105 — INTRODUCTION TO THE HISTORY OF AFRICA

3-4 credits.

Major historic and current problems in African life, as seen by Africans.

HISTORY/​ED POL  107 — THE HISTORY OF THE UNIVERSITY IN THE WEST

3-4 credits.

The history of the university in the Western world from its beginnings in the 10th century to the present. Concentrates on universities, students, and professors in Italy, France, England, Germany, and the United States.

HISTORY 108 — INTRODUCTION TO EAST ASIAN HISTORY - KOREA

3-4 credits.

Survey of major cultural, social, political, and intellectual developments in Korea from the 10th century to the 21st century.

HISTORY 109 — INTRODUCTION TO U.S. HISTORY

3-4 credits.

Exploration of a thematic or chronological area of United States history from a variety of critical historical perspectives. Topics vary by instructor.

HISTORY/​CLASSICS  110 — THE ANCIENT MEDITERRANEAN

4 credits.

An examination of the evolution of the human community in the Mediterranean Basin, from the beginning of the earliest civilizations in the Near East (3,000 B.C.E.) until the collapse of the Roman Empire in the West (500 C.E.).

HISTORY 111 — CULTURE & SOCIETY IN THE ANCIENT MEDITERRANEAN

3-4 credits.

This course provides students with a thematic and cross-cultural introduction to the ancient Mediterranean world from prehistoric times to Late Antiquity. Students will gain a sense of chronological change and cultural diversity by looking at a series of case studies arranged around a weekly theme. These examine the connectivity and isolation of communities across the Mediterranean world, varieties of political organization and social relations, as well as economic structures.

HISTORY/​MEDIEVAL/​RELIG ST  112 — THE WORLD OF LATE ANTIQUITY (200-900 C.E.)

4 credits.

History of the Mediterranean World from the late Roman Empire to the development of distinct European, Byzantine and Islamic civilizations (ca. 200-900 CE). Special attention will be paid to the rise and development of Christianity and Islam.

HISTORY 115 — MEDIEVAL EUROPE 410-1500

4 credits.

From the later Roman Empire to the end of the Middle Ages.

HISTORY 118 — EARLY MODERN WORLD

3-4 credits.

An introduction to world history, 1450-1800, when new connections were forged between continents and, arguably, "the world" became one place. We shall study travelers, merchants, refugees, and empires, and the objects that bound them together: Ming porcelain and silk, woolen blankets and calico, silver and cochineal. We shall explore changing understandings of boundaries, oceans, travel, and "the world" itself.

HISTORY 119 — THE MAKING OF MODERN EUROPE 1500-1815

4 credits.

Principal developments in the history of Europe from the Renaissance to the fall of Napoleon.

HISTORY 120 — EUROPE AND THE MODERN WORLD 1815 TO THE PRESENT

4 credits.

Political, economic, social, and cultural history of modern Western civilization.

HISTORY 123 — ENGLISH HISTORY: ENGLAND TO 1688

3-4 credits.

Political, economic, social, and cultural history from earliest historic times.

HISTORY 124 — BRITISH HISTORY: 1688 TO THE PRESENT

4 credits.

Political, economic, social, and cultural history of Great Britain.

HISTORY/​ENVIR ST/​HIST SCI  125 — GREEN SCREEN: ENVIRONMENTAL PERSPECTIVES THROUGH FILM

3 credits.

From Teddy Roosevelt's 1909 African safari to the Hollywood blockbuster King Kong, from the world of Walt Disney to The March of the Penguins, cinema has been a powerful force in shaping public and scientific understanding of nature throughout the twentieth and twenty-first century. How can film shed light on changing environmental ideas and beliefs in American thought, politics, and culture? And how can we come to see and appreciate contested issues of race, class, and gender in nature on screen? This course will explore such questions as we come to understand the role of film in helping to define the contours of past, present, and future environmental visions in the United States, and their impact on the real world struggles of people and wildlife throughout the world.

HISTORY/​AFRICAN  129 — AFRICA ON THE GLOBAL STAGE

3-4 credits.

Explores the interplay between Africa and the World from the 19th century to the present, covering subjects such as the slave- trade, repatriation, Africanizing of culture in the Americas and Europe, the spread and revival of world religions, colonialism, global capitalism, the rise of global popular culture such as pop music and video films, environmental concerns and global epidemics.

HISTORY 130 — AN INTRODUCTION TO WORLD HISTORY

3-4 credits.

Introduction to major themes in world history. Such themes might include: empire and imperialism, environmental impacts, global trade and globalization, war, migration, gender, race, religion, nationalism, class, and the like.

HISTORY/​RELIG ST  131 — INTRODUCTION TO CHRISTIANITY: JESUS TO THE PRESENT

4 credits.

Survey of Christianity from its beginnings to its diverse global manifestations today, including beliefs, institutions, ritual, lived experience, and interactions with broader culture and society.

HISTORY/​GEN&WS  134 — WOMEN AND GENDER IN WORLD HISTORY

3-4 credits.

A global (comparative and transnational) survey of women and gender from the ancient world to the modern period. Introduces students to key issues in the history of women and gender, including the historical construction of identities, roles, symbols, and power relationships.

HISTORY 135 — COLLOQUIUM IN COMPARATIVE WORLD HISTORY

4 credits.

HISTORY 136 — SPORT, RECREATION, & SOCIETY IN THE UNITED STATES

3-4 credits.

As much as we may try to convince ourselves that sport offers an escape from the "real world," constant news of players' strikes, stadium financing controversies, and the lack of diversity in league management remind us that we cannot separate the games we play and watch from the political, social, and cultural contexts in which they are embedded. With this in mind, this course explores how sport has shaped and been shaped by major trends in American social, political, and economic history. Lectures and discussion sections will not focus on player stats or the morning edition of SportsCenter. Instead, students will engage with serious historical arguments and debates about sport's relationship to American capitalism, social movements, and urban development. Readings also provide a diverse set of perspectives on the politics of race, gender, and class in American sport in the twentieth century. Non-sports fans are welcome and encouraged to enroll!

HISTORY 139 — THE MIDDLE EAST IN THE 20TH CENTURY

3-4 credits.

Partition of the Ottoman Empire; rise of independent states; French, British, United States, and Soviet involvement; the cold war; Arab-Israeli conflict.

HISTORY 142 — HISTORY OF SOUTH ASIA TO THE PRESENT

3-4 credits.

Survey of the development of societies within the Indian subcontinent. Equal segments for the ancient, medieval and modern periods. Open to all undergrads.

HISTORY/​LCA  144 — TRAVELING THE WORLD: SOUTH ASIANS IN DIASPORA

4 credits.

Millions of South Asians left their home in the Indian subcontinent to travel the world across the Indian Ocean to Africa, the Middle East and Southeast Asia; across the Atlantic Ocean to the Caribbean and Britain; and across the Pacific Ocean to Fiji and California. This course follows these Indian traders, political leaders, workers and pilgrims as they discovered the world beyond India. The cultural, social, economic and political experiences of these sojourners and settlers reveals an exciting transnational perspective on the history of migration, diaspora, nationalism and colonialism in India, Africa, Asia, America and Britain.

HISTORY 150 — AMERICAN HISTORIES: THE NINETEENTH CENTURY

4 credits.

An introduction to the major themes of U.S. history from nationhood to emergence as a world power. An exploration of the range of primary sources available to U.S. historians and the varieties of historical argument.

HISTORY/​ASIAN AM  160 — ASIAN AMERICAN HISTORY: MOVEMENT AND DISLOCATION

3-4 credits.

Examines the impact of colonialism, war, and capitalism on the movement of Asians to the U.S. Considers how racial, gendered, class, sexual, and national formations within the U.S. structured Asian immigration to North America.

HISTORY/​ASIAN AM  161 — ASIAN AMERICAN HISTORY: SETTLEMENT AND NATIONAL BELONGING

3-4 credits.

Examines the social, cultural, and political citizenship of Asians in the U.S. with particular emphasis on diaspora, transnationality, and place.

HISTORY 199 — DIRECTED STUDY

1-3 credits.

HISTORY 200 — HISTORICAL STUDIES

3-4 credits.

Introduction to historical studies at the research university. Emphasis on interpretation and critical thinking. Small-group discussion and intensive writing. Topics vary.

HISTORY 201 — THE HISTORIAN'S CRAFT

3-4 credits.

Students conduct original historical research and convey the results to others. Through engagement with archival materials, undergraduates become historical detectives; they practice defining important historical questions, collecting and analyzing evidence, presenting original conclusions, and contributing to ongoing discussions. Students confer individually with and receive feedback from instructors to improve their skills of historical analysis and communication in both written and spoken formats. Requirements include at least 30 pages of writing - including drafts - and two or more formal oral presentations, each totaling at least five minutes. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be prepared to undertake historical research and writing in a variety of courses, including the HIST 600 capstone seminar.

HISTORY/​LCA/​RELIG ST  205 — THE MAKING OF THE ISLAMIC WORLD: THE MIDDLE EAST, 500-1500

3-4 credits.

Development of society and culture in the Middle East and North Africa from the emergence of Islam (7th century) to early modern times.

HISTORY/​RELIG ST  208 — WESTERN INTELLECTUAL AND RELIGIOUS HISTORY TO 1500

3-4 credits.

Survey of key themes in Western intellectual history and religious thought from ancient Greece through the Renaissance, focusing on relationships among classical, Jewish, and Christian traditions.

HISTORY/​RELIG ST  209 — WESTERN INTELLECTUAL AND RELIGIOUS HISTORY SINCE 1500

3-4 credits.

A survey of major trends in Western intellectual history and religious thought in the modern era, a period that saw a new range of competing ideas about the divine, the human condition, justice and the social order, and the quest for meaning. The course explores shifts in Christian and Jewish thought as well as secular alternatives to religious outlooks. Topics include the impact of the Reformation, Scientific Revolution, and Enlightenment; radical critiques of religion; existentialism; theological responses to World Wars and the Holocaust; and civil rights and social justice. Sources include films, novels, autobiographies, essays, theological works, and political manifestos.

HISTORY/​RELIG ST  212 — THE HISTORY OF WESTERN CHRISTIANITY TO 1750

4 credits.

A survey of Christianity from being a small, persecuted sect in the Roman Empire to becoming the dominant religion of western Europe, penetrating into the lives of Europeans, fissuring into multiple churches, and spreading across the globe. Attention is given to doctrine, ritual, worship, architecture, images, and music.

HISTORY/​JEWISH  213 — JEWS AND AMERICAN POP. CULTURE

3-4 credits.

Explores the interplay between Jews and U. S. popular culture, covering such subjects as early 20th century vaudeville, the "golden age" of Hollywood, rhythm and blues music, television, and stand-up comedy.

HISTORY/​MEDIEVAL  215 — LIFE IN THE MIDDLE AGES: AN INTER-DEPARTMENTAL COURSE

3-4 credits.

An introduction to the life and culture of the Middle Ages with lectures from members of the departments offering courses within the Medieval Studies Program.

HISTORY/​JEWISH  219 — THE AMERICAN JEWISH EXPERIENCE: FROM SHTETL TO SUBURB

4 credits.

Surveys American Jews from the eighteenth century until after WW II, examining political behavior (radicalism, liberalism, and nationalism), class formation, social mobility, culture, inter-ethnic group relations, religion, and problems in community building.

HISTORY/​JEWISH  220 — INTRODUCTION TO MODERN JEWISH HISTORY

4 credits.

The history of the Jews in selected parts of the world since the 17th century. Particular attention will be paid to the fact that this is the history of a minority group whose life unfolds in relationship to a larger society.

HISTORY 221 — EXPLORATIONS IN AMERICAN HISTORY (H)

3-4 credits.

Topics vary reflecting the interests, expertise, and innovating intention of the instructor. May receive credit only once for each topic taken

HISTORY 223 — EXPLORATIONS IN EUROPEAN HISTORY (H)

3-4 credits.

Topics vary reflecting the interests, expertise, and innovating intention of the instructor. May receive credit only once for each topic taken

HISTORY 224 — EXPLORATIONS IN EUROPEAN HISTORY (S)

3 credits.

Topics vary reflecting the interests, expertise, and innovating intention of the instructor. May receive credit only once for each topic taken

HISTORY 225 — EXPLORATIONS IN THIRD WORLD HISTORY (H)

3-4 credits.

Topics vary reflecting the interests, expertise, and innovating intention of the instructor. May receive credit only once for each topic taken

HISTORY 227 — EXPLORATIONS IN THE HISTORY OF RACE AND ETHNICITY

3 credits.

Topics on racial/ethnic minorities in the US in historical perspective; or topics that intersect with race or ethnicity in the US; or comparative historical topics that address how racial/ethnic minorities in the US negotiate exclusion and marginalization.

HISTORY 228 — EXPLORATIONS IN TRANSNATIONAL/COMPARATIVE HISTORY (SOCIAL SCIENCE)

3 credits.

Explores topics that involve at least two continents. Topics vary reflecting the interests, expertise, and innovating intention of the instructor. May receive credit only once for each topic taken

HISTORY 229 — EXPLORATIONS IN TRANSNATIONAL/COMPARATIVE HISTORY (HUMANITIES)

3 credits.

Explores topics that involve at least two continents. Topics vary reflecting the interests, expertise, and innovating intention of the instructor. May receive credit only once for each topic taken

HISTORY/​RELIG ST  230 — JUDAISM, CHRISTIANITY, AND ISLAM: BRAIDED HISTORIES

3 credits.

An examination of the braided histories of Judaism, Christianity and Islam from 2000 BCE to 2000 CE, emphasizing their theological, cultural, and political relationships.

HISTORY 240 — COLONIAL LATIN AMERICA FROM CONQUEST TO INSURGENCY

4 credits.

Pre-Columbian cultures; conquests by Spain and Portugal; socioeconomic, cultural, and political dynamics of colonial life; background of independence crisis.

HISTORY 241 — LATIN AMERICA FROM 1780 TO 1940

4 credits.

Latin America from the Age of Revolution to the World Depression. Nation-state formation; rise of political conflict and socioeconomic inequality.

HISTORY 242 — MODERN LATIN AMERICA, 1898 TO THE PRESENT

4 credits.

Human and political dynamics of state-directed development; neoliberalism. Nature and consequences of foreign intervention.

HISTORY/​GEOG/​LCA/​POLI SCI/​SOC  244 — INTRODUCTION TO SOUTHEAST ASIA: VIETNAM TO THE PHILIPPINES

4 credits.

Southeast Asian history, religion, folklore and literatures, educational systems, and politics from the early classical states to contemporary social, literary, and political developments.

HISTORY/​CHICLA/​GEN&WS  245 — CHICANA AND LATINA HISTORY

3 credits.

Introduces the cultural, economic, social, and political history of Chicanas and Latinas in the U.S. and focuses on four major themes: contact between different ethnic/racial groups; ideas of nation and nationalism; constructions of identity; and struggles for social justice.

HISTORY/​ASIAN AM/​LCA  246 — SOUTHEAST ASIAN REFUGEES OF THE "COLD" WAR

4 credits.

In-depth study of the peoples, conflicts, and wars in Cambodia, Laos, and Vietnam, with emphasis on the Cold War ear (1945-1990) and on the resulting migration and resettlement of over one million Hmong, Khmer, Lao, and Vietnamese in the United States.

HISTORY 248 — GLOBALIZATION AND CRISES

3-4 credits.

Since 2008, leaders and politicians have constantly been defining, avoiding and responding to political, economic and cultural crisis. Concern about crises is not new and learning about how people around the world have responded to crises in the past could definitely help us respond to our present crises and perhaps pave the way to a better future. This course will examine various economic, political, cultural and intellectual crises from the early modern period to the present, and focus on how people have tried to make sense of them and go beyond them.At the same time, we will attempt to provide a historical framework that takes into account discussions of globalization avant la lettre, such as Janet Abu-Lugod's now well-known Beyond European Hegemony.

HISTORY/​GEOG/​LCA/​POLI SCI/​SOC  252 — THE CIVILIZATIONS OF INDIA-MODERN PERIOD

4 credits.

Contemporary India society as a joint product of the classical heritage and world-wide movements toward nationalism; social and economic development.

HISTORY/​GEOG/​POLI SCI/​SLAVIC  253 — RUSSIA: AN INTERDISCIPLINARY SURVEY

4 credits.

Comprehensive interdisciplinary survey of Russian civilization from its beginnings through the present day.

HISTORY/​GEOG/​POLI SCI/​SLAVIC  254 — EASTERN EUROPE: AN INTERDISCIPLINARY SURVEY

4 credits.

Comprehensive interdisciplinary survey of East European culture, society, politics, and literature from its beginnings to the present day.

HISTORY/​E A STDS/​POLI SCI  255 — INTRODUCTION TO EAST ASIAN CIVILIZATIONS

3-4 credits.

Multidisciplinary and historical perspectives on the East Asian civilizations of China, Japan, Korea, Tibet and Mongolia from prehistory to the present, including developments in philosophy, economy, governance, social structure, kinship, geography, etc.

HISTORY/​AFROAMER/​ANTHRO/​C&E SOC/​GEOG/​LACIS/​POLI SCI/​SOC/​SPANISH  260 — LATIN AMERICA: AN INTRODUCTION

3-4 credits.

Latin American culture and society from an interdisciplinary perspective; historical developments from pre-Columbian times to the present; political movements; economic problems; social change; ecology in tropical Latin America; legal systems; literature and the arts; cultural contrasts involving the US and Latin America; land reform; labor movements; capitalism, socialism, imperialism; mass media.

HISTORY/​LEGAL ST  261 — AMERICAN LEGAL HISTORY TO 1860

3-4 credits.

This course surveys the development of American law down to the U.S. Civil War. After a review of the English historical background, it examines how law changed in colonial America, culminating in the framing of the U.S. Constitution. It then explores how territorial expansion, democracy, and slavery shaped nineteenth-century American law. Emphasis is on how law interacts with political, social, and cultural change, with a focus on the origins of modern civil and constitutional rights.

HISTORY/​LEGAL ST  262 — AMERICAN LEGAL HISTORY, 1860 TO THE PRESENT

3-4 credits.

This course surveys the development of American law from the Civil War to the early Twenty-First Century. After a review of the U.S. Constitution and its modification by the Civil War amendments, it examines the legal dimensions of such topics as race relations and the Civil Rights movement, the growth of modern business, the New Deal, labor rights, the women's movement, the individual rights revolution of the postwar period, and the contemporary conservative reaction. Emphasis is on how law interacts with political, social, and cultural change.

HISTORY/​ANTHRO/​ART HIST/​DS/​LAND ARC  264 — DIMENSIONS OF MATERIAL CULTURE

4 credits.

This course introduces students to the interdisciplinary field of material culture studies. It is intended for students interested in any professional endeavor related to material culture, including careers in museums, galleries, historical societies, historic preservation organizations, and academic institutions. During the semester, students have varied opportunities to engage with and contemplate the material world to which people give meaning and which, in turn, influences their lives. Sessions combine in some way the following: presentations from faculty members and professionals who lecture on a phase of material culture related to his/her own scholarship or other professional work; discussion of foundational readings in the field; visits to collections and sites on campus and around Madison; discussion of readings assigned by visiting presenters or the professors; and exams and short papers that engage material culture topics.

HISTORY/​LCA  265 — AN INTRODUCTION TO CENTRAL ASIA: FROM THE SILK ROUTE TO AFGHANISTAN

3 credits.

Examination of human geography, ethnicity, nomadism and pastoralism, oases cultures, religion and international politics of the silk routes of central Asia.

HISTORY/​E ASIAN/​RELIG ST  267 — ASIAN RELIGIONS IN GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE

3-4 credits.

Comparative and thematic introduction to diverse Asian religious traditions, ideas and communities, and their relevance to human societies of the past and present..

HISTORY 269 — WAR, RACE, AND RELIGION IN EUROPE AND THE UNITED STATES, FROM THE SCRAMBLE FOR AFRICA TO TODAY

3-4 credits.

This course investigates the complex history of European and American violence and war-making through the lens of race and religion. Taking a comparative approach, we analyze several major conflicts of the twentieth century, from World War I to the wars of decolonization, and from the genocide of the Herero peoples to the Armenian Genocide, the Holocaust, and beyond. How did religious forces and racial claims shape these conflicts? How did these wars reinforce the modern notion of the nation-state, and strengthen both racist and anti-racist movements? Key topics in the class include the genealogy of the modern idea of "race" in Europe and the U.S.; the drive towards a world of more homogeneous nation-states after World War I; and the emergence of transnational protest movements opposed to racism, imperialism, antisemitism, and Islamophobia. Drawing on a range of texts, songs, and films, the course will investigate new connections between Europe and the United States. Join us as we take an international look at concepts like race and nation, and try to make sense of extreme violence, war-making, and the pre-requisites of peace.

HISTORY 270 — EASTERN EUROPE SINCE 1900

3-4 credits.

This class introduces students to the dramatic history of twentieth-century Eastern Europe, a place where imperialism, Nazism, Communism, genocide, democracy, and capitalism all left their mark. The course revolves around three interrelated themes--war, revolution, and society--all of which allow us to place Eastern Europe within broader comparative contexts. In addition to exploring significant political, economic, and cultural changes, we'll discover how ordinary people--including workers, peasants, women, and children--experienced attempts to change the region and its people. Throughout, we will discuss how East Europeans continue to wrestle with the ghosts of their past today.

HISTORY 271 — HISTORY STUDY ABROAD: EUROPEAN HISTORY

1-4 credits.

Topics vary reflecting the specializations, expertise, and curricula of study abroad programs.

HISTORY 272 — HISTORY STUDY ABROAD: UNITED STATES HISTORY

1-4 credits.

Topics vary reflecting the specializations, expertise, and curricula of study abroad programs.

HISTORY 273 — HISTORY STUDY ABROAD: NON-WESTERN HISTORY

1-4 credits.

Topics vary reflecting the specializations, expertise, and curricula of study abroad programs.

HISTORY 274 — HISTORY STUDY ABROAD: TRANSNATIONAL/GLOBAL HISTORY

1-4 credits.

Topics vary reflecting the specializations, expertise, and curricula of study abroad programs.

HISTORY 275 — TOPICS IN LGBT HISTORY

3 credits.

Topics in the major issues and themes in lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender history, considered across race, class, nationality, and time.

HISTORY/​ASIAN AM/​E A STDS  276 — CHINESE MIGRATIONS SINCE 1500

3-4 credits.

Introduces the comparative history of Chinese migrations to the U.S. and world. Examines patterns of movement; imagined communities through cultural identity, citizenship, queerness, heritage tourism, studying abroad, and transnational adoption; as well as sites of cultural production such as food, literature, architecture, and cinema.

HISTORY/​AFRICAN/​AFROAMER/​ANTHRO/​GEOG/​POLI SCI/​SOC  277 — AFRICA: AN INTRODUCTORY SURVEY

4 credits.

African society and culture, polity and economy in multidisciplinary perspectives from prehistory and ancient kingdoms through the colonial period to contemporary developments, including modern nationalism, economic development and changing social structure.

HISTORY 278 — AFRICANS IN THE AMERICAS, 1492-1808

3-4 credits.

Topics include demography and structure of the slave trade, but major focus on continuities and transformations of African cultures and social structures in the Americas--ethnicity, religion, kinship, gender, oral tradition, creolization, etc.

HISTORY 279 — AFRO-ATLANTIC HISTORY, 1808-PRESENT

3-4 credits.

Emphasis on the history of political, social, and intellectual movements. Topics include slave resistance, freedom, black nationalism, socialism, anti-colonialism, gender, religion, art, literature, race, and medicine.

HISTORY 283 — INTERMEDIATE HONORS SEMINAR-STUDIES IN HISTORY

3 credits.

Honors, intermediate-level exploration of selected topics, featuring intensive reading, writing, and small-group discussion. Topics vary reflecting the interests, expertise, and innovating intention of the instructor.

HISTORY/​AFRICAN/​AFROAMER/​POLI SCI  297 — AFRICAN AND AFRICAN-AMERICAN LINKAGES: AN INTRODUCTION

4 credits.

Analysis of retention of African elements in African-American oral, written, and material culture. Social, cultural, and political issues regarding race, self-definition, and self-determination in both Africa and North America will be examined.

HISTORY 302 — HISTORY OF AMERICAN THOUGHT, 1859 TO THE PRESENT

3-4 credits.

How thinkers have coped with the intellectual shocks of Darwin, Marx, and Freud, and with cultural shocks ranging from Gilded Age industrialization to the changing mores and nuclear realities of contemporary mass society.

HISTORY 303 — A HISTORY OF GREEK CIVILIZATION

3-4 credits.

From the Bronze Age to the Hellenistic Age. Special emphases may vary with each offering.

HISTORY 304 — UNITED STATES, 1877-1914

3-4 credits.

The rise and impact of modern industrialism, organization of labor and farmers, disappearance of the frontier, growth of American imperialism, and the resulting political, intellectual, and social changes in America.

HISTORY 305 — UNITED STATES 1914-1945

3-4 credits.

Political, social, economic, and cultural changes in America during World War I, the Twenties, the Age of the Great Depression, World War II.

HISTORY 306 — THE UNITED STATES SINCE 1945

3-4 credits.

Political, social, economic, and cultural changes in the U.S. from World War II to the present.

HISTORY 307 — A HISTORY OF ROME

3-4 credits.

Roman civilization from the monarchy through the collapse of the Roman Empire in the west.

HISTORY/​E ASIAN/​LCA/​RELIG ST  308 — INTRODUCTION TO BUDDHISM

3-4 credits.

The basic thought, practices and history of Buddhism, including selflessness and relativity, practices of meditation, merit-making and compassion from both local and translocal perspectives. Includes a discussion of Buddhism as a contemporary, North American religion.

HISTORY/​MEDIEVAL/​RELIG ST  309 — THE CRUSADES: CHRISTIANITY AND ISLAM

3-4 credits.

An examination of the Crusades from both Christian and Islamic perspectives; the historical, social, and religious context and significance of the Crusades for both Christians and Muslims.

HISTORY/​MEDIEVAL/​RELIG ST  312 — THE MEDIEVAL CHURCH

3-4 credits.

The course covers the formation and development of exxlesiastical institutions and religious life in Western Europe from the fourth century to the Protestant Reformation.

HISTORY/​MEDIEVAL  313 — INTRODUCTION TO BYZANTINE HISTORY AND CIVILIZATION

3-4 credits.

Topical consideration of the entire scope of the history of the Byzantine Empire, from the fourth to the fifteenth centuries, and selected aspects of its culture.

HISTORY/​MEDIEVAL  314 — PROBLEMS IN BYZANTINE HISTORY AND CIVILIZATION

3-4 credits.

Intensive study of specific areas of the Byzantine Empire's history and culture, selected by agreement between instructor and students, stressing individual research efforts.

HISTORY/​GEN&WS  315 — GENDER, RACE AND COLONIALISM

3 credits.

Investigates how gender and race were socially constructed in cultural encounters between Europeans and "other" peoples in Africa, Asia, and the Americas.

HISTORY/​MEDIEVAL/​RELIG ST  318 — MEDIEVAL SOCIAL AND INTELLECTUAL HISTORY, 1200-1450

3-4 credits.

Emphasis on social change and intellectual developments.

HISTORY 319 — THE VIETNAM WARS

3-4 credits.

Explores the prolonged cycle of wars in Vietnam and its neighbors, 1940 to date, with due regard for both local and U.S. perspectives.

HISTORY 320 — EARLY MODERN FRANCE, 1500-1715

3-4 credits.

Social, cultural and political history of France (1500-1715): Renaissance; Reformation and Wars of Religion; Rise of absolutist monarchy; Popular culture and peasant life; Colonization and New France.

HISTORY/​AFROAMER  321 — AFRO-AMERICAN HISTORY SINCE 1900

3-4 credits.

Survey of African American history from 1900 to the present. Topics covered include segregation, the Civil Rights Movement, the political, social and cultural changes of the late 20th century, and the Obama presidency.

HISTORY/​AFROAMER  322 — AFRO-AMERICAN HISTORY TO 1900

3-4 credits.

Survey of African American history from its roots in Africa to the end of the 19th century. Topics considered include the slave trade, the political and cultural practices of enslaved communities, forms of resistance, Reconstruction, and systems of segregation.

HISTORY/​HIST SCI  323 — THE SCIENTIFIC REVOLUTION: FROM COPERNICUS TO NEWTON

3 credits.

An introduction to the formative period of modern science, including major ideas and events in the physical and life sciences from Copernicus to Newton. Grads enroll concurrently in HIST SCI 623

HISTORY/​HIST SCI  324 — SCIENCE IN THE ENLIGHTENMENT

3 credits.

Development and triumph of Newton's gravitational law; the conceptual revolution in chemistry; earth history and the move from religious to natural cosmologies. 4th credit requires extra work.

HISTORY/​ENVIR ST  328 — ENVIRONMENTAL HISTORY OF EUROPE

3 credits.

This class explores a new approach to a part of the world with a very old history, but one that is now as 'modern' as any. The changing, complex relations between Europeans and their environments from antiquity to the twenty-first century offer instructive comparison with American and current global environmental concerns. Approaching Mediterranean and Western civilizations from an environmental viewpoint also offers fresh perspective on these enduring cultures.

HISTORY 329 — HISTORY OF AMERICAN CAPITALISM

4 credits.

Survey of political, social, and economic change in the history of American capitalism from the late colonial period to the near-present.

HISTORY 332 — ISLAM REFORM AND REVOLUTION IN CENTRAL ASIA

3-4 credits.

Muslim societies of Central Asia and the caucasus in relationship to Russia and later the U.S.S.R., China, Iran, and Afghanistan among other states. The focus is the process of socio-cultural and political change from 1800 to the present.

HISTORY 333 — THE RENAISSANCE

3-4 credits.

Emphasis on the transition from medieval to early modern thought in Italy, 1300-1525.

HISTORY/​RELIG ST  334 — THE REFORMATION

3-4 credits.

The division of Western Christendom, 1500-1650, and its impact on Europe and the world.

HISTORY 335 — KOREAN HISTORY, 1945 TO PRESENT

3-4 credits.

A historical examination of North and South Korea politics, society, and culture from 1945 to present.

HISTORY 336 — CHINESE ECONOMIC AND BUSINESS HISTORY: FROM SILK TO IPHONES

3-4 credits.

This is an intermediate-level course on Chinese economic and business history that covers both pre-modern and modern China. The approach is historical; no prior knowledge of economics is required. Topics addressed include: how people thought about property, labor, and value, money and the banking and financial systems, development of domestic and international markets and trade, major industries, the search for resources, agricultural economy, the connection of law and economy, organizations that affected the economy, systemic changes during the Republic and People's Republic, China's participation in international economic institutions, and more.

HISTORY/​E A STDS  337 — SOCIAL AND INTELLECTUAL HISTORY OF CHINA, 589 AD-1919

3-4 credits.

The culture of the literati in the T'ang; major trends of Neo-Confucianism during the Sung and Ming; the Confucian response to the West in the nineteenth century; the emergence of the modern Chinese intelligentsia and iconoclasm in the early May Fourth period.

HISTORY 340 — CULTURAL HISTORY OF KOREA

3-4 credits.

The culture and society of Korea have evolved hand in hand with the country's transformation from the Choson dynasty, a relatively isolated Confucian kingdom built on an agrarian economy, to South Korea and North Korea, two modern, industrialized nation-states in the globalized present. This course explores key aspects of Korea's great cultural and social transformation from the 15th century to the 21st century. We will delve into recent studies on gender history and on the constructed notion of "national culture." We will also analyze primary sources from different historical periods, as well as cinematic representations of Korea's past and present.

HISTORY/​E A STDS  341 — HISTORY OF MODERN CHINA, 1800-1949

3-4 credits.

The disintegration of traditional Chinese society under the impact of Western imperialism, the rise of modern Chinese nationalism, and the emergence of modern revolutionary movements and ideologies.

HISTORY/​E A STDS  342 — HISTORY OF THE PEOPLES REPUBLIC OF CHINA, 1949 TO THE PRESENT

3-4 credits.

The social, economic and political transformation of China under Communism; the role of ideology in contemporary Chinese historical development; the nature of that historical development in the comparative perspective of other post-revolutionary histories.

HISTORY 343 — COLONIAL BRITISH NORTH AMERICA

3-4 credits.

The development of Britain's North American colonies c. 1550-1763 in trans-Atlantic perspective. Topics include the natural environment; British imperial and cultural institutions; relations with other European settlers and Amerindians; Africans and slavery; community life; religious diversity; economic enterprise; and politics. Satisfies either the Social Studies or the Humanities breadth requirement.

HISTORY 344 — THE AGE OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION, 1763-1789

3-4 credits.

Structure of American society, Britain and the Colonies; the revolutionary movement for independence; the war for independence; social, political, and constitutional change.

HISTORY 345 — MILITARY HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES

3-4 credits.

The founding and growth of the military establishment, the exercise of the military art, and military policies treated in connection with relevant political, social, and economic factors. Students that have previously taken HISTORY 427 or HISTORY 428 are not eligible to enroll for this course.

HISTORY/​GEN&WS  346 — TRANS/GENDER IN HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE

3-4 credits.

Throughout recorded history, humans have conceptualized categories of sex and gender in a variety of ways; some have elaborated just two main sex/genders, others have elaborated more than two categories. At the same time, regardless of how a given culture has defined sex and gender and the behaviors and appearances deemed appropriate, humans have always exceeded those definitions. Quite simply, the determination of male and female and any other sex or gender category is neither obvious nor simple: what is sex, what is gender? Do they reside in the body, behavior, psyche, clothing, or social processes such as racialization? To make matters still more complicated, cultural beliefs about sex/gender have changed across time. How have contacts across cultures through migration and colonization affected people's understanding of sex/gender possibilities and norms? This course focuses on sex/gender crossing and variation in historical contexts including Japan, South Africa, Europe, the African diaspora, and North America. We will consider perspectives of people who themselves passed, crossed, transitioned, transed, or otherwise exceeded their culture's definitions of normative sex/gender. Alongside, we will consider the ways that dominant social institutions reinforced norms, recognized, tolerated, punished and/or celebrated gender variation. We will examine popular culture, medical and legal perspectives, memoir, queer and trans theory, and social movement treatises.

HISTORY/​AFROAMER  347 — THE CARIBBEAN AND ITS DIASPORAS

3 credits.

Major topics in the history of Caribbean societies from the European conquest to the present. Emphasis on colonial rule, slavery, and the diaspora communities created by Caribbean peoples in the United States and Europe.

HISTORY 348 — FRANCE FROM NAPOLEON TO THE GREAT WAR, 1799-1914

3-4 credits.

Politics, society and culture in nineteenth century France. Emphasis on France's revolutionary heritage and problems of establishing a democratic regime.

HISTORY 349 — CONTEMPORARY FRANCE, 1914 TO THE PRESENT

3-4 credits.

Social, political, and cultural history of twentieth century France, especially the Great War, the Popular Front, the Vichy Regime, DeGaulle and the Fifth Republic, Mitterrand's socialist experiment, France's changing role in the world and the European Community.

HISTORY 350 — THE FIRST WORLD WAR AND THE SHAPING OF TWENTIETH-CENTURY EUROPE

3-4 credits.

The experience and legacy of the First World War has been linked to nearly every social, cultural, and political transformation that marked the short century that followed: mobilization and the experience of total war transformed the relations between governments and citizens, between men and women, and between social classes. Europeans experienced death on an unprecedented scale and came to terms with new forms of industrialized warfare, from the use of poison gas to modern practices of genocide. Europeans now learned to live with violence, both during as well as after the war, and found new ways to mourn or remember the dead. This course will explore such themes. Using a wide variety of contemporary sources -- memoirs, essays, poems, or cinematic representations -- we will try to situate the upheaval of 1914-1918 within the larger framework of twentieth-century European history.

HISTORY 351 — SEVENTEENTH-CENTURY EUROPE

3-4 credits.

Intellectual, social and political developments during the seventeenth century. Impact of the Scientific Revolution and Rationalism on traditional beliefs. Revolts against Absolutism. The so-called "general crisis".

HISTORY 352 — EIGHTEENTH CENTURY EUROPE

3-4 credits.

Political, cultural, and social transformations in eighteenth century Europe.

HISTORY/​GEN&WS  353 — WOMEN AND GENDER IN THE U.S. TO 1870

3-4 credits.

An advanced and comparative study of the roles of gender, class, and race in American history and historiography. Themes include women as agents of social change and as builders of community.

HISTORY/​GEN&WS  354 — WOMEN AND GENDER IN THE U.S. SINCE 1870

3-4 credits.

See 520.

HISTORY/​CHICLA/​LACIS/​POLI SCI  355 — LABOR IN THE AMERICAS: US & MEXICO IN COMPARATIVE & HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE

3 credits.

Provides a critical examination of the history of labor and working people in the Americas, from the colonial era to the present. It focuses on the experience of the United States and Mexico, offering a comparative perspective on their distinct but also shared (and increasingly linked) histories. The seminar proceeds chronologically, highlighting major episodes in the evolution of labor systems in the two countries, beginning with the colonial labor systems implemented by the Spanish and British empires following the European conquest of the Western Hemisphere. Among other topics, we will examine the pivotal role of slavery and other forms of forced labor, the impact of the industrial revolution, the emergence and expansion of corporate capitalism and the labor unrest it provoked in the post-civil war U.S., the role of labor in the Mexican Revolution and its aftermath, the impact of the Great Depression and labor incorporation on the post-WWII social and political order of both countries, the breakdown of that order and the move to neo-liberalism in the 1970s and 1980s, and the emergence of an increasingly integrated North American production system and its consequences for labor and working people on both sides of the US-Mexico border.

HISTORY 357 — THE SECOND WORLD WAR

3-4 credits.

Background and history of World War II. Problems of peacemaking and international organizations; rise of Fascism, National Socialism, and Japanese imperialism; breaking the peace; World War II.

HISTORY 358 — FRENCH REVOLUTION AND NAPOLEON

3-4 credits.

Explores the French Revolution and the Age of Napoleon. Why did Revolution break out in one of the most powerful and traditional monarchies of Europe? What were the roots of discontent and the sources of revolutionary ideas? Probes the exciting twists and turns of revolutionary politics and the attempt to spread "liberty equality" into ordinary life, even abolishing slavery in response to massive slave revolt in the French colonies. Asks how the French interacted with a transnational revolutionary movement across Europe, the US, and the Atlantic world. Though focused on a specific revolutionary era, the course also aims to reflect on timeless questions: Why is it so difficult to create democracy? Is violence ever justified to overcome oppression and injustice? Finally, why did this experiment in radical democracy also unleash the Terror and launch Napoleon Bonaparte, the politician and general who built an astonishing European Empire? And how did he pull it off for as long as he did?.

HISTORY 359 — HISTORY OF EUROPE SINCE 1945

3-4 credits.

Political, cultural, and social history of Europe from the Second World War to the present.

HISTORY/​ENGL/​RELIG ST  360 — THE ANGLO-SAXONS

3 credits.

Life and literature during the Old English period (c450-c1100). Primary emphasis on the vernacular and Latin writings of the Anglo-Saxons themselves. Extensive historical and archaeological background; attention to the development and character of monasticism, to the production of manuscripts, etc. All reading in translation. Students who have taken English 360 prior to fall 2014 may not enroll in the course.

HISTORY 361 — THE EMERGENCE OF MOD BRITAIN: ENGLAND 1485-1660

3-4 credits.

Cultural, economic, political, and social issues and developments, foreign relations; the background of empire.

HISTORY/​E A STDS  363 — CHINA AND WORLD WAR II IN ASIA

3-4 credits.

This course is intended to help students understand World War II from the perspective of Asia. The focus is not only on the American and Japanese roles in the war but also on lesser, often overlooked participants such as China, Korea, and Southeast Asia. The course will focus not only on the diplomatic, political, and military situation of wartime Asia, but also on perceptions and experiences of the war from those most heavily affected by it: those experiencing it on the ground. Understanding this war is critical for helping us understand contemporary Asia. The foundations of the Cold War and the post-Cold War world that we live in today were forged on battlefields in mainland China, Burma, small islands in the Pacific, and in the skies over the archipelago of Japan. In order to provide the background and understand the legacies, this course covers an extended time frame, beginning in the 19th century with the arrival of the West in Asia and continues into the 1950s.

HISTORY 367 — SOCIETY AND IDEAS IN SHAKESPEARE'S ENGLAND

3-4 credits.

Explores the relationship between social change and the major systems of thought in Tudor and Stuart England. Popular magic and religion, astrology, witchcraft, the varieties of Anglican protestantism and puritan dissent, the scientific revolution and political thought.

HISTORY/​JEWISH/​MEDIEVAL/​RELIG ST  368 — THE BIBLE IN THE MIDDLE AGES

3 credits.

Medieval Bible and its shaping effect on medieval culture.

HISTORY/​JEWISH  373 — MODERN POLITICAL HISTORY OF THE JEWS: 1655-1919

4 credits.

Focuses on the politics of emancipation (the acquisition of civil rights). Analyzes Jewish politics from the beginnings of political integration into European society (1695) to the completion of the process in the aftermath of World War I.

HISTORY/​JEWISH  374 — MODERN POLITICAL HISTORY OF THE JEWS: ERA OF MASS MOVEMENTS, 1870-1970

4 credits.

This course will focus on Jewish socialist and nationalist political movements, analyzing their origins in imperial Russia in the late 19th century and their development in the Soviet Union, Poland, Palestine/Israel, and the U.S. in the 20th century.

HISTORY 377 — HISTORY OF AFRICA, 1500 TO 1870

3-4 credits.

Studies of Ottoman and European expansion into Africa. The slave trade and unique internal dynamics in African cultures and societies during the period 1500-1870.

HISTORY 378 — HISTORY OF AFRICA SINCE 1870

3-4 credits.

From the European conquest: resistance movements, African social history, the politics of independence. Emphasis on Africa south of the Sahara.

HISTORY/​RELIG ST  379 — ISLAM IN IRAN

3 credits.

History of Islam in Iran from Arab conquest in the seventh century to the Islamic Revolution in 1978-89.

HISTORY 391 — THE AGE OF JEFFERSON AND JACKSON, 1789-1848

3-4 credits.

Establishment of the national government, growth of democracy and the nature of party development, westward expansion, economic change, slavery, and social reform.

HISTORY/​GEN&WS  392 — WOMEN IN HISTORY

3-4 credits.

An examination of the cultural, social, economic, and political activities of women. Geographical or chronological emphasis varies with instructor.

HISTORY/​AFROAMER  393 — SLAVERY, CIVIL WAR, AND RECONSTRUCTION, 1848-1877

3-4 credits.

African-American slavery and its impact on mid-19th century social, political, and economic life; the causes, course, and consequences of the Civil War; the rise and fall of postwar Reconstruction and non-racial citizenship; the impact of these histories on contemporary American society.

HISTORY/​HIST SCI/​MED HIST  394 — SCIENCE IN AMERICA

3 credits.

From the colonial period to the present; emphasis on the development of scientific institutions and the influence of science on American life.

HISTORY 403 — IMMIGRATION AND ASSIMILATION IN AMERICAN HISTORY

3-4 credits.

Survey of immigration to the U.S. from colonial times to the present with analyses of the roles of ethnic and racial groups in economics and politics, the reactions of earlier arrivals to their successors, the extent of assimilation and contemporary ethnic and racial consciousness.

HISTORY 408 — AMERICAN LABOR HISTORY: 1900-PRESENT

3-4 credits.

An examination of work, workers, and working class culture in twentieth century America.

HISTORY 410 — HISTORY OF GERMANY, 1871 TO THE PRESENT

3-4 credits.

Political and social development of Central Europe from the establishment of the German Empire to the post-World War II period.

HISTORY/​ED POL  412 — HISTORY OF AMERICAN EDUCATION

3 credits.

This course examines the history of education in America from the colonial period to the present, including the rise of common (public) schools; the education of populations differing by race, ethnicity, gender, language, religion, and social class; the development of school curricula; the politics of desegregation, bilingual education, and special education; and the evolving federal role in American education.

HISTORY/​JEWISH  416 — EASTERN EUROPEAN JEWS IN THE UNITED STATES, 1880S-1930S

3-4 credits.

Analyzes the culture and community of the two million Jews who migrated to the United States between 1880 and 1930.

HISTORY 417 — HISTORY OF RUSSIA

3-4 credits.

Origins and evolution of the Russian people and state; political, economic, and social history; foreign relations as they affect domestic policy; from the ninth century to 1800.

HISTORY 418 — HISTORY OF RUSSIA

3-4 credits.

Russian political, economic, and social history from 1800 to 1917; foreign relations as they affect domestic policy.

HISTORY 419 — HISTORY OF SOVIET RUSSIA

3-4 credits.

Major political, economic and social developments in Russia since 1917.

HISTORY 420 — RUSSIAN SOCIAL AND INTELLECTUAL HISTORY

3-4 credits.

Main currents of Russian social thought in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Recommended that students have some knowledge of modern Russian history or of modern European cultural history.

HISTORY/​CHICLA/​POLI SCI  422 — LATINO HISTORY AND POLITICS

3 credits.

Students will examine the historical, social, political, economic, and cultural experiences and conditions of Latinos, one of the largest US racial/ethnic minority groups. Course focus is on people who trace their origins to Mexico, the Caribbean, and countries of Latin America.

HISTORY 424 — THE SOVIET UNION AND THE WORLD, 1917-1991

3-4 credits.

Surveys Soviet foreign relations from 1917-1991, examining the causes, course, and outcome of the Cold War. Topics include: Soviet-US relations, World War II, the Socialist Bloc, espionage, the space race, Sino-Soviet relations, and Soviet intervention in the 'Third World.'

HISTORY 425 — HISTORY OF POLAND AND THE BALTIC AREA

3-4 credits.

Northern part of East Central Europe, the territory included in the former Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth.

HISTORY/​LEGAL ST  426 — THE HISTORY OF PUNISHMENT

3-4 credits.

This course examines punishment across a vast range of historical traditions, examining how wrongdoing and punishment have been figured in law, literature, art and philosophy. Through the semester we will examine ancient, medieval and modern traditions.

HISTORY 427 — THE AMERICAN MILITARY EXPERIENCE TO 1902

3-4 credits.

A survey of American military experience from the 16th century through the development of a nascent American "empire" at the turn of the 19th and 20th centuries, examining the influence of warfare on all aspects of American society.

HISTORY 428 — THE AMERICAN MILITARY EXPERIENCE SINCE 1899

3-4 credits.

A survey of American military experience in the 20th and 21st centuries, examining the influence of warfare on all aspects of American society.

HISTORY/​ENVIR ST/​LEGAL ST  430 — LAW AND ENVIRONMENT: HISTORICAL AND CONTEMPORARY PERSPECTIVES

3 credits.

Explores environmental studies through a focus on law and legal history. Although its main concentration is on U.S. environmental law, the course will begin and end with broader historical and global perspectives. Topics include a survey the English, European, and early American legal approaches to land use, natural resources, and pollution through World War II as well as an examination of the development and practice of contemporary U.S. environmental law and consideration of the recent emergence of international environmental law.

HISTORY/​SCAND ST  431 — HISTORY OF SCANDINAVIA TO 1815

3 credits.

Political, social, economic and cultural developments of Scandinavia through the "Viking Age" to the break-up of Sweden-Finland and Denmark-Norway; emphasis on the interplay between social and political forces and institutions and the area's relationship with the rest of Europe.

HISTORY/​SCAND ST  432 — HISTORY OF SCANDINAVIA SINCE 1815

3 credits.

Political, social, economic, and cultural development: political realignments and rise of nationalism, industrialization and rise of liberalism and socialism, democratization, independence struggles and social conflict, evolution of welfare states, World War II and its aftermath.

HISTORY 434 — AMERICAN FOREIGN RELATIONS, 1901 TO THE PRESENT

3-4 credits.

America's relations with the world, emphasizing the economic, political and ideological elements determining policy.

HISTORY/​CHICLA  435 — COLONY, NATION, AND MINORITY: THE PUERTO RICANS' WORLD

3 credits.

A historical introduction to the Puerto Rican experience, from island to mainland. Varieties of colonial rule, social institutions, cultural processes, and ethnic and national identity. Migration to the U.S. and social dynamics of stateside communities.

HISTORY/​RELIG ST  437 — WESTERN CHRISTIANITY FROM AUGUSTINE TO DARWIN

4 credits.

A survey of Christianity from the fourth century through the nineteenth. Explores the culture of Christianity--architecture, literature, images, and mosic--in orner to understand how Christianity has become a world religion.

HISTORY/​LCA/​RELIG ST  438 — BUDDHISM AND SOCIETY IN SOUTHEAST ASIAN HISTORY

3-4 credits.

Therevada Buddhism in Southeast Asia; ideas and basic tenets; history and its impact on social and political institutions; the monastic order and relations with the states; roles in the early history up to the present; focus on Thailand and Burma.

HISTORY/​RELIG ST  439 — ISLAMIC HISTORY FROM THE ORIGIN OF ISLAM TO THE OTTOMAN EMPIRE

3-4 credits.

Political action and organization in medieval Islam (ca 600-1500), with focus on selected states.

HISTORY 441 — REVOLUTION AND CONFLICT IN MODERN LATIN AMERICA

3-4 credits.

Comparative analysis of the relationship between socio-economic structure and political conflict in nineteenth and twentieth century Latin America. Cases, chosen to illustrate such outcomes as social revolution, authoritarian repression and electoral stalemate, vary each year.

HISTORY 444 — HISTORY OF EAST AFRICA

3-4 credits.

Formation of ethnic groups, state building, the development of pre-colonial trade institutions, and African social and political history in the colonial period.

HISTORY 445 — HISTORY OF EQUATORIAL AFRICA

3-4 credits.

Area south of Lake Chad and north of Southwest Africa and Zambia from the advent of the Iron Age to the present.

HISTORY/​LCA  450 — MAKING OF MODERN SOUTH ASIA

3-4 credits.

Everything you ever hear about South Asia is true. But the exact opposite is also true. Tradition and modernity, development and stagnation, the past and the future all exist simultaneously, at times in harmony and at other times in conflict with one another. Through an exploration of the political, social and economic history of this region from the 18th century to the present day, students will learn about the making of modern South Asia and attempt to understand this paradox.

HISTORY/​ENVIR ST/​F&W ECOL  452 — WORLD FOREST HISTORY

3 credits.

Examines world forest history, with attention to links between societal change and forest change. Examines how different peoples have used or abused the forest, how societies have struggled to establish policies governing forests, and how perceptions of forests have evolved.

HISTORY/​E A STDS  454 — SAMURAI: HISTORY AND IMAGE

3-4 credits.

Japanese warriors, their ideals, and their images from the tenth century to the present.

HISTORY/​E A STDS  456 — PEARL HARBOR & HIROSHIMA: JAPAN, THE US & THE CRISIS IN ASIA

3-4 credits.

Events leading to the Pearl Harbor attack, the conduct of World War II in the Pacific, the nature of the wartime Japanese state and effects of the war on Japanese society, the dropping of the atomic bombs, and Japan's decision to surrender. The war as an epoch in Japanese history.

HISTORY/​LCA  457 — HISTORY OF SOUTHEAST ASIA TO 1800

3-4 credits.

Formation and development of classical Indian and Chinese influenced societies in the area comprising present-day Burma, Thailand, Cambodia, Laos, Vietnam, Malaysia, Indonesia, and the Philippines, and their meeting with Islam and the early Europeans.

HISTORY/​LCA  458 — HISTORY OF SOUTHEAST ASIA SINCE 1800

3-4 credits.

Effects of the modern Western revolution on the established societies of Southeast Asia through colonial rule and economic and cultural change.

HISTORY/​LEGAL ST  459 — RULE OF LAW: PHILOSOPHICAL AND HISTORICAL MODELS

3-4 credits.

From the perspectives of history and political theory, this course examines the multiple meanings of the idea of the rule of idea, and its uses in American history. We then explore prominent critiques of the rule of law ideal.

HISTORY/​ENVIR ST/​GEOG  460 — AMERICAN ENVIRONMENTAL HISTORY

4 credits.

Survey of interactions among people and natural environments from before European colonization to present. Equal attention to problems of ecological change, human ideas, and uses of nature and history of conservation and environmental public policy.

HISTORY/​CHICLA  461 — THE AMERICAN WEST TO1850

3-4 credits.

North American frontiers through the period of the Mexican War. Major Indian cultures of North America; the frontiers and differing imperial systems of Spain, France, and England; and the westward movement of the United States through 1850.

HISTORY/​CHICLA  462 — THE AMERICAN WEST SINCE 1850

3-4 credits.

The West as frontier and region since 1850. Indian-white and other interethnic relations; federal policies; the development of a resource-intensive economy, its environmental effects, and political conflicts accompanying it; and the ideology of the frontier in American culture.

HISTORY 463 — TOPICS IN SOUTH ASIAN HISTORY

3 credits.

Topics vary.

HISTORY/​ART HIST/​DS  464 — DIMENSIONS OF MATERIAL CULTURE

3 credits.

Approaches to the interdisciplinary study of the material world in order to analyze broader social and cultural issues. Guest speakers explore private and public objects and spaces from historic, ethnographic, and aesthetic perspectives.

HISTORY/​ECON  465 — THE AMERICAN ECONOMY TO 1865

3-4 credits.

Survey of the forces underlying American economic development and the distribution of income; rise of regional economies; origins of manufacturing; effects of slavery; influence of government and politics on growth.

HISTORY/​ECON  466 — THE AMERICAN ECONOMY SINCE 1865

3-4 credits.

Emergence of the large corporation; growth and instability since the mid-nineteenth century; increasing government participation in the economy; the impact of war, depression, discrimination, and international responsibilities.

HISTORY 467 — ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL HISTORY OF EUROPE 1500-1750

3-4 credits.

Population trends, technology, and the level of economic activity; overseas expansion and its impact on Europe; the northward shift of economic power; wealth and poverty in early modern society.

HISTORY/​CHICLA  468 — POPULAR CULTURE IN THE MULTI-RACIAL UNITED STATES

3-4 credits.

Origins and development of widely distributed popular culture in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries with emphasis on race and racialization. Exploration of production/performance and consumption of minstrel shows, wild west shows, film, radio, television, music in topical units.

HISTORY/​ENVIR ST/​GEOG  469 — THE MAKING OF THE AMERICAN LANDSCAPE

4 credits.

Surveys the historical geography and environmental history of the United States by tracing the evolution of the American landscape from precolonial times to the present, with special emphasis on teaching students skills they can use to interpret landscape history themselves.

HISTORY/​RELIG ST  470 — RELIGIOUS THOUGHT IN MODERN EUROPE

3-4 credits.

History of religious thought in modern Europe (19th and 20th centuries) as reflected in theology, philosophy, literature, and political and social theory. Major emphasis on Protestant and Roman Catholic traditions but with additional discussion of Judaism and Orthodoxy.

HISTORY/​GEN&WS/​LCA  472 — WOMEN IN TURKISH SOCIETY

3 credits.

Interdisciplinary analysis of women's issues in Turkish society from the Ottoman era imperial harem to Islamist feminist movements in the secular Republic of Turkey today. Emphasis on the critical use of a comprehensive set of disciplinary lenses.

HISTORY 474 — EUROPEAN SOCIAL HISTORY, 1830-1914

3-4 credits.

Societal change in an age of revolution; bourgeois culture and its discontents; class, gender, religion, region, and nation; formation of political ideologies, including liberalism, conservatism, socialism, anarchism, imperialism, and racism.

HISTORY 475 — EUROPEAN SOCIAL HISTORY, 1914-PRESENT

3-4 credits.

State, class, gender, and culture from he world wars to the present. Democracy, communism, fascism. Emphasis on everyday life, consumption, leisure, technology, and Americanization.

HISTORY/​LEGAL ST  476 — MEDIEVAL LAW AND SOCIETY

3 credits.

The course is intended to introduce students to the central historical developments of law and legal institutions in the European middle ages (400-1500).

HISTORY/​ED POL  478 — COMPARATIVE HISTORY OF CHILDHOOD AND ADOLESCENCE

3 credits.

Growth of modern childhood and adolescent sub-cultures, class differences, literary and pictorial representations, legal and demographic developments, and the growth of educational theories and institutions.

HISTORY/​AMER IND  490 — AMERICAN INDIAN HISTORY

3-4 credits.

HISTORY 500 — READING SEMINAR IN HISTORY

3 credits.

Advanced exploration of selected topics, featuring intensive reading, writing, and small-group discussion. Topics vary.

HISTORY/​LEGAL ST  502 — LAW AND COLONIALISM

3 credits.

Historical introduction to the role of law in the context of empire, with special emphasis on 19th-20th C British imperialism; explores themes of class, race and gender through fields of law including criminal, property, family, contract and labor law.

HISTORY 503 — IRISH AND SCOTTISH MIGRATIONS

3 credits.

An examination of migrations into, out of, and between Ireland and Scotland from Roman times to the present. Particular attention paid to migrant and ethnic experiences in the United States, Canada, England, Australia, New Zealand, as well as other destinations.

HISTORY/​HIST SCI/​MED HIST  504 — SOCIETY AND HEALTH CARE IN AMERICAN HISTORY

3 credits.

Lecture-seminar. Health care in America since the colonial period; emphasis on social developments.

HISTORY 505 — HISTORY AT WORK: PROFESSIONAL SKILLS OF THE MAJOR

1-2 credits.

This seminar is intended to help history majors understand how their History degree applies to the world of work. Students will explore how their history skills relate to the needs of professional employers. Students will be guided in the process of finding and obtaining professional internships. Students will polish written and oral communication skills in forms appropriate for professional situations. Students will also learn from the experiences of guest speakers from a variety of fields.

HISTORY 506 — HISTORY AT WORK: HISTORY INTERNSHIP SEMINAR

3 credits.

This seminar is intended to help History majors understand how their History degree applies to the world of work. Intended to supplement students' internship experiences, class hours will be dedicated to discussing issues that arise in students' internships, polishing written and oral communication skills in forms appropriate for professional situations, and exploring how students' historical skills apply to the workplace. Students will also learn from the experiences of guest speakers from a variety of fields. Students must be participating in an internship at the beginning of the term for which they enroll. Students who are not able to get internships for that semester should enroll in Hist 505.

HISTORY/​HIST SCI/​MED HIST  507 — HEALTH, DISEASE AND HEALING I

3-4 credits.

Medicine in Europe from antiquity to the 18th century, investigating changes in medical ideas, institutions, practices, and organization.

HISTORY/​HIST SCI/​MED HIST  508 — HEALTH, DISEASE AND HEALING II

3-4 credits.

Medicine in Europe from the 18th century to mid-20th century, investigating changes in disease and demography, state interest in health care, the medical professions, and both scientific and alternative medical ideas.

HISTORY/​LEGAL ST  510 — LEGAL PLURALISM

3 credits.

Historical and anthropological perspectives on non-state "law," or systems of rules generated by normative orders that lay beyond the state; case studies include the mafia, Tokyo tuna traders' court, orthodox Jewish diamond merchants, California gold miners' courts, Inuit song dueling.

HISTORY/​RELIG ST  512 — THE ENLIGHTENMENT AND ITS CRITICS

3 credits.

European intellectual history in the 17th and 18th centuries, from the Wars of Religion to the French Revolution. The course examines the rise of Enlightenment thought in relation to political and religious conflict, revolutions in science and philosophy, and the emergence of the public sphere. Special attention is devoted to the Enlightenment's relationship to religion and to critiques made of Enlightenment thinking, including by early Romanticism.

HISTORY 514 — EUROPEAN CULTURAL HISTORY SINCE 1870

3-4 credits.

The fin de siecle and the main cultural trends of the twentieth century.

HISTORY/​CURRIC/​JEWISH  515 — HOLOCAUST: HISTORY, MEMORY AND EDUCATION

3 credits.

This course explores the ways in which Holocaust history, memory and education are mutually entangled, politically charged and morally complex. Using primarily American sites of memory, students will critically analyze a variety of representations of the Shoah--in literature, films, memoirs, monuments, museums and classrooms.

HISTORY/​CLASSICS/​RELIG ST  517 — RELIGIONS OF THE ANCIENT MEDITERRANEAN

3 credits.

Ancient religions in their political, social and cultural contexts; topics include ritual, literary and artistic representations, religious persecutions, and/or modern approaches to the study of ancient religions. Chronological and geographical focus will vary between Greece, Rome, Judaea and Egypt.

HISTORY/​JEWISH  518 — ANTI-SEMITISM IN EUROPEAN CULTURE, 1700-1945

3 credits.

A critical review of major theories of anti-Simitism and a history of modern anti-Semitism.

HISTORY/​GEN&WS  519 — SEXUALITY, MODERNITY AND SOCIAL CHANGE

3 credits.

A history of sexuality approach to a period of major social, economic, and political change in US history, 1880-1930; medical, legal, and popular discourses shaping urbanization, reform, nationalism and colonialism.

HISTORY 525 — THE WORLD AND THE WEST FROM 1492

3-4 credits.

How and why of major recurring types of relations between Westerners and other peoples of the world during five centuries of intensifying contact. Patterns considered: trading post empires (Eastern spices, Northern furs), slave plantation colonies, true empires (minute Western ruling elites), creole empires (Latin America, South Africa), settlement colonies, and informal empire (neocolonialism).

HISTORY/​JEWISH/​RELIG ST  529 — INTELLECTUAL AND RELIGIOUS HISTORY OF EUROPEAN JEWRY, 1648-1939

4 credits.

Main movements and trends of thought, religion, and culture as European Jewry gained emancipation and adjusted to mass society.

HISTORY 533 — MULTI-RACIAL SOCIETIES IN LATIN AMERICA

3-4 credits.

Genesis, evolution, and contradictions of racially heterogeneous societies, from European conquest to the present. Social history of Indians, Blacks, and Asians; relationships between racial, sexual, and class oppressions. Regional emphasis may vary.

HISTORY 540 — BALKANS AND MIDDLE EAST, 1700-1918: THE RISE OF NATIONAL STATES

3-4 credits.

Survey of political, economic and cultural organizations and their transformation under the market economy and relations with England, France and Russia.

HISTORY/​HIST SCI/​MED HIST  543 — DOCTORS AND DELUSIONS: MADNESS AND MEDICINE IN THE MODERN ERA

3 credits.

Medical approaches to mental illness from 1750 to the present. Emphasis on how tension between biomedical and socio-environmental theories about psychopathology have marked modern psychiatry. Focus on Europe and the United States with global and comparative dimensions.

HISTORY/​LCA/​RELIG ST  547 — RELIGION, COLONIALISM & MODERNITY IN SOUTHEAST ASIA

3 credits.

Examines changes in Southeast Asian religions (Buddhism, Confucianism, Islam) and experiences of modernity during the colonial period. Focus on religious and literary expressions from Thailand, Cambodia, Vietnam and Indonesia.

HISTORY/​CLASSICS/​FRENCH/​ITALIAN/​MEDIEVAL  550 — ADVANCED INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES IN MEDIEVAL CIVILIZATION

3 credits.

An integrated treatment of a specific theme, to be announced by a group of specialists in different fields.

HISTORY 555 — HISTORY OF BRAZIL

3-4 credits.

The evolution of Brazil's society, economy, and political institutions since the arrival of the Portuguese court in 1808. Attention to the forces that have supported or opposed modernization.

HISTORY/​JOURN  560 — HISTORY OF MASS COMMUNICATION

4 credits.

Evolution of the mass media in the United States in the context of political, social, and economic change.

HISTORY/​CLASSICS/​HIST SCI/​MED HIST/​S&A PHM  561 — GREEK AND ROMAN MEDICINE AND PHARMACY

3 credits.

Greek and Roman medicine and drug lore from the Pre-Socratics to Oribasius (c. 600 B.C. - A.D. 350), including the backgrounds of ancient Egyptian and Mesopotamian medicine.

HISTORY/​HIST SCI/​MED HIST/​MEDIEVAL/​S&A PHM  562 — BYZANTINE MEDICINE AND PHARMACY

3 credits.

Byzantine and Islamic medicine and drug lore from Oribasius to the beginnings of the Italian Renaissance (c. 350 - c. 1400 A.D.).

HISTORY/​HIST SCI/​MED HIST  564 — DISEASE, MEDICINE AND PUBLIC HEALTH IN THE HISTORY OF LATIN AMERICA AND THE CARIBBEAN

3 credits.

This course examines the history of illness and medical practice in Latin America and the Caribbean from the colonial era until the present. Using an interdisciplinary set of sources, students will explore the different meanings of disease, body normativity, medical practice, and ideas about public health across different historical circumstances in the region. Include Graduate and Professional level

HISTORY/​L I S  569 — HISTORY OF AMERICAN LIBRARIANSHIP

3 credits.

Development of American librarianship from Colonial times to the present, with special reference to the relationship of library institutions to their contemporary social, economic, cultural and political environments.

HISTORY/​SCAND ST  577 — CONTEMPORARY SCANDINAVIA: POLITICS AND HISTORY

3-4 credits.

Social, economic, and ideological changes, institutions, and movements and their relationships with the political processes and structures in the Nordic states.

HISTORY 600 — ADVANCED SEMINAR IN HISTORY

3 credits.

Development and application of advanced research skills to a specific historical topic. Intensive writing and small group discussion results in a project demonstrating original or creative analysis of primary and secondary sources.

HISTORY 601 — HISTORICAL PUBLISHING PRACTICUM

3 credits.

Hands-on instruction and experience in historical publishing. Discussion of the nature of historical research and writing.

HISTORY 607 — THE AMERICAN IMPACT ABROAD: THE HISTORICAL DIMENSION

3 credits.

Repeatable (as topic changes) with cons inst. Analysis of diplomatic, economic, cultural, and social interaction of Americans with foreign peoples and nations.

HISTORY/​ED POL  622 — HISTORY OF RADICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL EDUCATION IN THE US AND UK

3 credits.

Examines the comparative history of radical and experimental education in the United States and United Kingdom since 1800. It focuses on the social, cultural, and intellectual history of diverse educational experiments, including experiments related to socialism, abolitionism, anarchism, and religious fundamentalism.

HISTORY/​AFROAMER  628 — HISTORY OF THE CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT IN THE UNITED STATES

3 credits.

Civil rights history from 1930-1970. Legal, historical and economic origins of the civil rights movement. Study of the movement's impact on United States culture, politics, and international relations.

HISTORY/​ART HIST/​JOURN/​L I S  650 — HISTORY OF BOOKS AND PRINT CULTURE IN EUROPE AND NORTH AMERICA

3 credits.

History of books and print culture in the West from ancient times to the present. Focus on the influence of reading and writing on social, cultural, and intellectual life. Methodologies, theories, and sources for study of book and print culture history.

HISTORY/​ED POL  665 — HISTORY OF THE FEDERAL ROLE IN AMERICAN EDUCATION

3 credits.

This course examines the history of federal aid to education, emphasizing the post-World War II period. It addresses such topics as desegregation; bilingual, special, and compensatory education; policy implementation and evaluation; and the connections between executive, legislative, and judicial actions.

HISTORY/​SOC  670 — CAPITALISM, SOCIALISM, AND DEMOCRACY IN AMERICA SINCE 1890

3-4 credits.

Political institutional arrangements which have emerged since 1890 and how they have influenced social and economic policies implemented since the Second World War. Why the working class has been politically weak in America; policy consequences of this weakness.

HISTORY 680 — HONORS THESIS COLLOQUIUM

2 credits.

Colloquium for honors thesis writers. Stdts must register concurrently for HISTORY 681 or 682

HISTORY 681 — SENIOR HONORS THESIS

1-3 credits.

Stdts must register concurrently in HISTORY 680

HISTORY 682 — SENIOR HONORS THESIS

1-3 credits.

Continuation of HISTORY 681. Stdts must register concurrently in HISTORY 680

HISTORY 690 — THESIS COLLOQUIUM

2 credits.

Colloquium for thesis writers. Stdts must register concurrently for HISTORY 691 or 692

HISTORY 691 — SENIOR THESIS

1-3 credits.

Research and writing on an original topic. Stdts pursuing distinction must register concurrently in Hist 690

HISTORY 692 — SENIOR THESIS

1-3 credits.

Continuation of HISTORY 691. Stdts pursuing distinction must register concurrently in Hist 690

HISTORY 698 — DIRECTED STUDY

1-4 credits.

Graded on a Cr/N basis; requires cons inst previous or conc exposure to the subject

HISTORY 699 — DIRECTED STUDY

1-4 credits.

Graded on a lettered basis; requires cons inst prev or con exposure to the subject

HISTORY 700 — PROSEMINAR: TRADITIONAL & EARLY MODERN CHINESE INTELLECTUAL HISTORY

3 credits.

The major problems of historical interpretations in Chinese intellectual history from the classical period to 1840 on the basis of English translations of primary sources and English-language secondary sources. Topics vary. Lin.

HISTORY 701 — HISTORY IN A GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE

1 credit.

Introduction to the ways of thinking characteristic of historical study and to the questions and methods that motivate the research fields in which department faculty work. Required of all graduate students in their first year.

HISTORY 703 — HISTORY AND THEORY

3 credits.

Explorations of the role of theory in historical research and writing. Content varies.

HISTORY 704 — TOPICS IN CONTEMPORARY HISTORY

3 credits.

This seminar studies two or more nations or defined regions through a comparison of a single theme or set of themes in their history.

HISTORY 705 — TOPICS IN GLOBAL HISTORY

3 credits.

This seminar examines the significance of a particular historical phenomenon from the perspective of its importance world-wide.

HISTORY 706 — TOPICS IN TRANSNATIONAL HISTORY

3 credits.

This seminar examines the significance of a particular event, phenomenon or question across national borders and in terms of the history of nation-state formation.

HISTORY 707 — PROSEMINAR IN EARLY MODERN EUROPEAN HISTORY, 1500-1789

3 credits.

HISTORY 710 — PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SEMINAR

3 credits.

Topics in professional development for historians with an emphasis on building skills that are valuable both inside and outside the academy, such as managing the writing process, teaching college history, or communicating historical research to a broad, nonspecialist audience. Content varies.

HISTORY/​AFROAMER/​ED POL  712 — EDUCATION AND THE CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT

3 credits.

Explores the historical relationship between education and the African American freedom struggle from the early twentieth century to the present. Topics include school segregation, desegregation, and resegregation; high school and college student activism; Black Power; civil rights protest strategies and tactics, and the role of the federal government.

HISTORY/​ED POL  713 — HISTORY OF HIGHER EDUCATION IN EUROPE AND AMERICA

3 credits.

Development of colleges, universities, and higher learning in Europe and America.

HISTORY/​MEDIEVAL  720 — SELECTED TOPICS IN MEDIEVAL HISTORY

1-3 credits.

HISTORY/​POLI SCI/​PUB AFFR  724 — THE POLITICS OF PERSUASION: SOFT POWER IN EUROPE AND THE U.S.

1-3 credits.

How powerful is non-military power? What are its vectors and its limits? International relations theorists have defined soft power as "the ability to get what you want through attraction rather than coercion." This graduate seminar will put this notion to the test. We will investigate how elites, interest groups, religious bodies, and nation-states seek to exercise hegemony in the international order through non-violent means. How was "soft power" implemented on the ground in the 20th century- and how did its use transform international relations? To probe these questions, we will focus on a series of case studies in European and U.S. international history. Topics covered include the expansion of capitalism and consumer culture; the globalization of international legal instruments and human rights claims; and de-secularization, religious radicalism, and counter-insurgency. In the process of analyzing our case studies, we will refine our analytical vocabulary. Drawing on recent work in international relations, political theory, and international history, we will probe the meaning and utility of concepts like normative power, hegemony, cultural capital, and public diplomacy.

HISTORY 725 — SEMINAR IN EAST ASIAN HISTORY

1-3 credits.

Major problems of historical interpretation in the early modern and recent histories of China, Japan, and Korea. Topics and periods of emphasis vary each year.

HISTORY 730 — PROSEMINAR IN LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY

1-3 credits.

Historical literature of significant topics in Latin American history. The colonial period, Brazilian history, and Spanish-America in the national period. Offered in alternate semesters.

HISTORY/​L I S  734 — INTRODUCTION TO ARCHIVES AND RECORDS MANAGEMENT

3 credits.

An introduction to the archives profession and basic theory and practice of archives and records administration, including the uses of primary sources in research, appraisal, access, and preservation.

HISTORY 751 — PROSEMINAR IN THE HISTORY OF AFRICA

1-3 credits.

Historical literature of Africa through comparative topics which vary each term.

HISTORY 752 — SEMINAR IN TRANSNATIONAL GENDER HISTORY

3 credits.

Themes in Gender and Women's History within a transnational context.

HISTORY 753 — SEMINAR-COMPARATIVE WORLD HISTORY

1-3 credits.

Topics significant for the histories of Latin America, Africa, Islamic core, South Asia and Southeast Asia. A single topic chosen each semester for a series of comparative essays by seminar members.

HISTORY 755 — PROSEMINAR IN SOUTHEAST ASIAN HISTORY

1-3 credits.

Introductory seminar in modern Southeast Asian history; work mostly in English-language sources.

HISTORY/​ANTHRO/​ART HIST/​DS/​LAND ARC  764 — DIMENSIONS OF MATERIAL CULTURE

4 credits.

This course introduces students to the interdisciplinary field of material culture studies. It is intended for students interested in any professional endeavor related to material culture, including careers in museums, galleries, historical societies, historic preservation organizations, and academic institutions. During the semester, students have varied opportunities to engage with and contemplate the material world to which people give meaning and which, in turn, influences their lives. Sessions combine in some way the following: presentations from faculty members and professionals who lecture on a phase of material culture related to his/her own scholarship or other professional work; discussion of foundational readings in the field; visits to collections and sites on campus and around Madison; discussion of readings assigned by visiting presenters or the professors; and exams and short papers that engage material culture topics.

HISTORY/​ANTHRO  774 — METHODS FOR HISTORICAL RESEARCH IN NON-LITERATE SOCIETIES

3 credits.

Techniques and critical analysis applied to written, oral, archaeological, linguistic and cultural data. Stresses problems of synthesis. Exercises.

HISTORY 795 — QUANTITATIVE METHODS FOR HISTORICAL RESEARCH

3 credits.

Types and use of quantitative techniques in historical research; introduction to basic methods, their application; discussion of kinds and sources of measurable historical data.

HISTORY 800 — RESEARCH SEMINAR IN HISTORY

3 credits.

Research seminar designed for students in all fields of history. Seminar is structured to enable students to complete the research paper requirement for the MA. It will introduce students to the life of a professional historian, to different styles and methods of history, and give them the opportunity to present their findings in a conference-type setting.

HISTORY/​CLASSICS  801 — SEMINAR-ANCIENT HISTORY

1-3 credits.

Special problems in Greek and Roman history studied in alternate years.

HISTORY/​FRENCH/​GERMAN/​POLI SCI/​SOC  804 — INTERDISCIPLINARY WESTERN EUROPEAN AREA STUDIES SEMINAR

3 credits.

HISTORY 805 — SEMINAR-MEDIEVAL HISTORY

1-3 credits.

Topics in intellectual history.

HISTORY/​JOURN  808 — MASS COMMUNICATION HISTORY

3 credits.

Intensive reading and discussion designed to introduce students to literature of mass communication.

HISTORY 813 — SEMINAR-BYZANTINE HISTORY & CIVILIZATION

1-3 credits.

Problems in historical, historiographical and cultural research in periods between the age of Diocletian and 1453.

HISTORY 822 — STUDIES IN ECONOMIC HISTORY

3 credits.

Topics vary each year.

HISTORY 829 — RESEARCH SEMINAR IN LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY

1-3 credits.

Research on topics in Latin American history. Special attention to methods of source analysis.

HISTORY 837 — SEMINAR-HISTORY OF MODERN BRITAIN AND IRELAND

1-3 credits.

Emphasis on social and political movements as well as on economic development.

HISTORY 845 — SEMINAR-CENTRAL EUROPEAN HISTORY

1-3 credits.

Modern German history and the history of Central Europe.

HISTORY 849 — SEMINAR-TOPICS IN HISTORY OF IMPERIAL RUSSIA, 1649-1917

1-3 credits.

Historiography and problems in the domestic, political, social, economic and cultural history of the Russian Empire to 1917 and of Southeast Europe to the present. Reading knowledge of Russian recommended but not required

HISTORY 850 — SMR-HIST OF THE SOVIET UNION & MODERN HIST OF E CENTRAL EUROPE

1-3 credits.

Development of the Soviet Union since 1917 and the political and diplomatic history of the nations lying between Russia and Germany.

HISTORY/​LCA  851 — SEMINAR ON OTTOMAN AND MIDDLE EAST HISTORY

1-3 credits.

Concepts applicable to the study of social, economic and institutional movements and developments in the area within a broad historical framework.

HISTORY 854 — SEMINAR IN MODERN CHINESE HISTORY

1-3 credits.

Chinese history in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, with emphasis on intellectual history and the history of Chinese Communism.

HISTORY 855 — SEMINAR IN JAPANESE HISTORY

1-3 credits.

Research seminar in Japanese history. Focus varies each year. Required for M.A. and Ph.D. candidates in Japanese history, but open to students with no Japanese language background.

HISTORY/​LCA  857 — SEMINAR-HISTORY OF INDIA (SOUTH ASIA)

1-3 credits.

Emphasis upon handling of research problems. Focus upon methods, resources, intellectual approaches, and changing interpretations. Appropriate language(s).

HISTORY/​RELIG ST  858 — SEMINAR IN PROBLEMS OF ISLAMIC HISTORY

2-3 credits.

Social and economic history of North Africa and the Middle East in Islamic and modern times.

HISTORY 861 — SEMINAR-THE HISTORY OF AFRICA

1-3 credits.

Research studies in aspects of African history with emphasis on field research techniques and interpretation of non-archival data.

HISTORY 867 — SEMINAR-EUROPEAN SOCIAL & INTELLECTUAL HISTORY

1-3 credits.

Subject matter varies every semester and alternates between the early modern and modern period.

HISTORY 868 — SEMINAR IN MODERN FRENCH HISTORY

1-3 credits.

Social, political, and cultural history of France, 1800 to the present.

HISTORY 891 — PROSEMINAR IN MODERN EUROPEAN HISTORY

1-3 credits.

History of Europe since 1500.

HISTORY 900 — INTRODUCTION TO HISTORY FOR U.S. HISTORIANS

3 credits.

A survey of U.S. history by period and field, designed to introduce new graduate students to U.S. history faculty members and each other. Extensive discussion of how to plan a successful career as a historian. S. history

HISTORY 901 — STUDIES IN AMERICAN HISTORY

1-3 credits.

Reading seminar in American history. Topics and periods of emphasis vary.

HISTORY 902 — RESEARCH SEMINAR IN AMERICAN HISTORY

1-3 credits.

Research topics and period of emphasis announced in advance by the professor in charge.

HISTORY/​ED POL  903 — HISTORY OF EDUCATION OF MULTICULTURAL AMERICA

3 credits.

Selected topics, issues and themes concerning the history of education of various groups of people of color in the United States, as well as selected issues, topics and themes focusing on immigration and ethnicity.

HISTORY/​ED POL  906 — PROSEMINAR ON THE HISTORY OF EDUCATION

1-3 credits.

Reading in European or American educational history.

HISTORY/​ED POL  907 — SEMINAR-HISTORY OF EDUCATION

1-3 credits.

Studies in European and American educational history.

HISTORY 910 — HISTORY OF COLONIAL NORTH AMERICA

3 credits.

The history of North America from the fifteenth through eighteenth centuries, with the primary focus on Anglo-America.

HISTORY/​JOURN  919 — SEMINAR-HISTORY OF MASS COMMUNICATION

3 credits.

Seminar in the history of mass communication in which students are expected to produce original research based on primary documents.

HISTORY 925 — SEMINAR-AMERICA IN THE CIVIL WAR ERA

2-3 credits.

Politics, society, and economics from the sectional crisis through the fall of southern reconstruction.

HISTORY 929 — LABOR AND WORKING CLASS HISTORY IN THE UNITED STATES

3 credits.

This course is a reading seminar intended to introduce students to key topics, seminal works, and historiographic controversies in U.S. working class and labor history from the post-Civil War period to the present.

HISTORY/​GEOG  932 — SEMINAR IN AMERICAN ENVIRONMENTAL HISTORY

3 credits.

Surveys recent and classic works on American environmental history to introduce students to the methods and historiography of the field.

HISTORY 936 — THE HISTORY OF WOMEN AND GENDER IN THE U.S., TO 1870

3 credits.

Surveys key theoretical work and secondary literature on the history of women and gender in the United States to 1870.

HISTORY 937 — THE HISTORY OF WOMEN AND GENDER IN THE U.S. SINCE 1870

3 credits.

Examines major and path breaking scholarship in the field of U.S. women's history, focusing on the era post 1870. Pays particular attention to race, class and sexuality as students learn to conduct a historical, gender analysis. Seminar format.

HISTORY/​GEN&WS  938 — HISTORY OF SEXUALITY

3 credits.

Using sexuality as a category of historical analysis, examines historiographical, methodological, and theoretical contributions to understanding all aspects of the past.

HISTORY 940 — SEMINAR-AMERICAN HISTORY 1900-1945

3 credits.

HISTORY/​AMER IND  941 — INDIANS AND EMPIRES

3 credits.

Examining the centuries of imperial competition in Native America, this seminar explores recent developments in early American Indian history.

HISTORY/​AMER IND  942 — AMERICAN INDIAN HISTORY, 1800-PRESENT

3 credits.

A readings course on American Indian resistance, adaptation, and revival during the U.S. National period.

HISTORY 943 — RACE & NATIONALISM: COMPARATIVE & THEORETICAL PERSPECTIVES

3 credits.

Graduate seminar on historical intersections of race and nationalisms. Explores questions of the origin of race and nationalisms, the position and status of a variety of nationalisms and anti-colonial nationalisms; and the contemporary debates over postmodernism, postindustrialism, postcolonialism, and multiculturalism.

HISTORY 945 — SEMINAR-AMERICAN HISTORY 1929 TO THE PRESENT

1-3 credits.

HISTORY 951 — SEMINAR-INTELLECTUAL HISTORY OF AMERICA

1-3 credits.

HISTORY 952 — SEMINAR IN COMPARATIVE HISTORY

2-3 credits.

HISTORY 958 — SEMINAR-AMERICAN MILITARY HISTORY

1-3 credits.

HISTORY/​RELIG ST  963 — AMERICAN RELIGIOUS HISTORY TO 1860

3 credits.

The creation of a national religious culture from the earliest settlements to the mid-nineteenth century.

HISTORY 965 — SEMINAR IN THE HISTORY OF THE AMERICAN WEST

1-3 credits.

HISTORY 974 — SEMINAR IN AMERICAN HISTORY FOR ADVANCED PLACEMENT TEACHERS

1-2 credits.

Graduate-level seminar for high school teachers attending the UW-Madison Summer AP Institute. Reading and discussion designed to deepen teachers' knowledge of historical issues and historiography, and introduce new perspectives into their classes.

HISTORY 975 — PRACTICUM IN AMERICAN HISTORY FOR ADVANCED PLACEMENT TEACHERS

1-2 credits.

Graduate-level practicum for high school teachers attending the UW-Madison Summer AP Institute. How to improve techniques for teaching college-level courses in American history, with an emphasis on integrating primary sources into the curriculum.

HISTORY/​L I S  976 — SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN ARCHIVES-MANUSCRIPTS ADMINISTRATION

3 credits.

A research seminar. Contemporary problems in archives administration, with special types of archival institutions and special classes of archival material.

HISTORY/​L I S  977 — THE PRACTICE OF ARCHIVES-MANUSCRIPTS ADMINISTRATION

3 credits.

Practical training in the collecting and accessioning, arrangement, describing and servicing of archives and manuscript holdings in the Division of Archives and Manuscripts of the State Historical Society under the direct supervision of the chief archivist or a member of the professional staff.

HISTORY 978 — TEACHING COLLEGE HISTORY: INTRODUCTION TO UNDERGRADUATE PEDAGOGY

2 credits.

Embracing the art of teaching as a key skill, and acknowledging that the desire to teach is one of the main motivations for graduate study, this course aims to translate passion for history and humanities education into practical skills for classroom success. We will explore how research on learning and teaching can be leveraged to maximize positive impact on student learning, create meaningful leaning experiences for all students, grade effectively, fairly, and efficiently while minimizing time commitments and frustrations. This course should lessen the burden of graduate student teaching by helping students learn how to preemptively avoid problems and enable undergraduate success. We will develop techniques for reaching all students where they are and helping them develop as historians and thinkers.

HISTORY/​SOC/​URB R PL  979 — SEMINAR IN URBAN HISTORY

3 credits.

Causes and consequences of urbanization, stressing social and economic aspects of major population movements, with particular attention to the United States.

HISTORY/​A A E/​ANTHRO/​C&E SOC/​GEOG/​LACIS/​POLI SCI/​PORTUG/​SOC/​SPANISH  982 — INTERDEPARTMENTAL SEMINAR IN THE LATIN-AMERICAN AREA

1-3 credits.

Interdisciplinary inquiry in Latin American society and culture.

HISTORY/​AFRICAN/​ANTHRO/​ECON/​GEOG/​POLI SCI  983 — INTERDEPARTMENTAL SEMINAR-AFRICAN STUDIES

3 credits.

Interdisciplinary inquiry in African society and culture.

HISTORY 990 — RESEARCH AND THESIS

1-9 credits.

HISTORY 999 — INDEPENDENT WORK

1-6 credits.

Properly qualified graduate students may, by agreement with the major professor, undertake special out-of-class work, generally upon research problems, during the recesses of the University. This special work available only to graduate students who have the master's degree or equiv.