GENETICS 1 — COOPERATIVE EDUCATION/CO-OP IN GENETICS

1 credit.

Full-time off-campus work experience which combines classroom theory with practical knowledge of operations to provide students with a background upon which to base a professional career. Students receive credit only for the term in which they are actively enrolled and working. The same work experience may not count towards credit in GENETICS 399.

GENETICS 133 — GENETICS IN THE NEWS

3 credits.

The science of genetics is at the heart of many issues facing our society, and as such, genetics is often in the news. This course explores the underlying genetics and methodologies to gain a deeper understanding of the science behind the headlines so that we can make more informed decisions as citizens. This course is intended for non-biological science majors, but a high school or college-level biology course is recommended as a prerequisite.

GENETICS 155 — FRESHMAN SEMINAR IN GENETICS

1 credit.

This seminar will introduce freshman to the discipline of genetics, to the UW Laboratory of Genetics, to some of the research projects the faculty are pursuing, to resources available at UW-Madison, and to the career options open to an individual with a genetics undergraduate degree.

GENETICS 289 — HONORS INDEPENDENT STUDY

1-2 credits.

INTER-AG 288

GENETICS 299 — INDEPENDENT STUDY

1-3 credits.

Open to Freshmen

GENETICS 375 — SPECIAL TOPICS

1-4 credits.

GENETICS 399 — COORDINATIVE INTERNSHIP/COOPERATIVE EDUCATION

1-8 credits.

GENETICS 400 — STUDY ABROAD IN GENETICS

1-6 credits.

Provides an area equivalency for courses taken on Madison Study Abroad Programs that do not equate to existing UW courses. W.-Madison Study Abroad Program

GENETICS 466 — PRINCIPLES OF GENETICS

3 credits.

Genetics in eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Includes Mendelian genetics, mapping, molecular genetics, genetic engineering, cytogenetics, quantitative genetics, and population genetics. Illustrative material includes viruses, bacteria, plants, fungi, insects, and humans. Students may not enroll for GENETICS 466 and GENETICS 467/468.

GENETICS 467 — GENERAL GENETICS 1

3 credits.

Genetics of eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Includes Mendelian genetics, probability and hypothesis testing, genetic mapping, molecular genetics, gene expression and genetic engineering. Illustrative material includes viruses, bacteria, plants, fungi, insects, and humans. Students may not enroll for GENETICS 466 and GENETICS 467/468.

GENETICS 468 — GENERAL GENETICS 2

3 credits.

Genetic analysis, population genetics, evolution and quantitative genetics. Includes mutant screens, pathway analysis, mosaic analysis, reverse genetics, genomics, Hardy-Weinberg linkage equilibrium, inbreeding, genetic drift, natural selection, population structure, inheritance of complex traits, domestication and human evolution. Students may not enroll in GENETICS 466 and GENETICS 467/468.

GENETICS 470 — BASIC CYTOLOGY AND LABORATORY PROCEDURES

1 credit.

A comprehensive review of cellular biology, the study of optical methods with emphasis on the light microscope and the various techniques used in preparation and staining of specimens for cytologic and histologic study.

GENETICS 471 — ADVANCED LABORATORY PROCEDURES

1 credit.

Preparation of non-gynecologic cytologic specimens using several different instrument methodologies. Application of universal precautions and safety in the handling of unknown biologic hazards. Introduction to histologic preparatory techniques and special staining methods.

GENETICS/​BIOLOGY  522 — EVOLUTION SEMINAR SERIES-UNDERGRADUATE

1 credit.

The Evolution Seminar Series exposes students to diverse topics in contemporary evolutionary biology. Most weeks, one or more guest lecturers present their own primary research on a specialized topic in evolutionary biology. Diverse seminars include perspectives from genetics, ecology, geoscience, zoology, botany, microbiology, systematics, molecular biology, and integrative research. Some weeks feature special topics and discussions on pedagogical, legal, outreach, or other issues in evolutionary biology. Students learn to think critically about methodology, experimental design and interpretation, and how conclusions are reached in evolutionary biology by reading primary and secondary literature, attending seminars, discussing topics with speakers and other students, moderating discussions, and preparing a written report.

GENETICS 545 — GENETICS LABORATORY

2 credits.

Students gain practical experience in classical and molecular genetic laboratory techniques using plants, animals, and fungi. Topics include complementation and linkage analysis, gene mapping, library screening, yeast and bacterial transformation, restriction analysis, PCR, sequencing, and Southern blot analysis.

GENETICS/​HORT  550 — MOLECULAR APPROACHES FOR POTENTIAL CROP IMPROVEMENT

3 credits.

Introduction of basic concepts of plant molecular biology and molecular techniques in current use. Topics include: organization and regulation of plant genes, gene cloning and analysis, transformation systems for plants, and molecular techniques for crop improvement.

GENETICS/​BOTANY/​HORT  561 — INTRODUCTORY CYTOGENETICS

2-3 credits.

Mitosis, meiosis, variations in chromosome structure and number, cytological aspects of hybridity and apomixis; chromosomes as they affect breeding behavior.

GENETICS/​MD GENET/​ZOOLOGY  562 — HUMAN CYTOGENETICS

2 credits.

Fundamental principles of cytogenetics and special problems of human cytogenetics for biology and medical students.

GENETICS 564 — GENOMICS AND PROTEOMICS

3 credits.

The basic principles of genomics, proteomics and bioinformatics will be taught through readings of the scientific literature, class presentations, group projects and computer lab web-based experiences. Emphasis will be placed upon student participation in the learning process. Some topics covered will be: genomic sequencing, motif discovery, DNA microarray, high-throughput genetics, chemical genetics, mass spectrometry techniques and protein networks. Biochemistry 501 and Microbiology 303 are recommended

GENETICS/​MD GENET  565 — HUMAN GENETICS

3 credits.

Principles, problems, and methods of human genetics. Surveys aspects of medical genetics, biochemical genetics, molecular genetics, cytogenetics, quantitative genetics, and variation as applied to humans.

GENETICS 566 — ADVANCED GENETICS

3 credits.

Principles of classical and molecular genetic analysis taught through readings in the scientific literature. Required of all undergrad genetics majors

GENETICS 567 — COMPANION RESEARCH SEMINAR

1 credit.

Student-led discussions on scientific, societal, and professional topics relevant to Senior research and selected original research presentations. This course is a companion seminar for independent research and together will fulfill the Genetics major capstone requirement. Must be taken concurrently with independent research GENETICS 699 or GENETICS 681/682 series

GENETICS 568 — THE CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM

1 credit.

Anatomy, physiology, histology and pathology of the central nervous system and the corresponding cellular manifestations which provide diagnostic information. Cell changes related to specimen preparation. Correlation of the didactic information with the microscopic cellular patterns to provide a diagnosis.

GENETICS 569 — THE BREAST

1 credit.

Anatomy, histology, physiology and pathology of the breast and the corresponding cellular manifestations which provide diagnostic information. Cell changes related to specimen processing. Correlation of the didactic information with the microscopic cell patterns to provide a diagnosis.

GENETICS 570 — THE FEMALE REPRODUCTIVE SYSTEM

8 credits.

Anatomy, histology, physiology, and pathology of the female reproductive tract and the corresponding cellular manifestations which provide diagnostic information. Cellular changes due to therapy and specimen collection. Correlation of the didactic information with the microscopic cellular patterns to provide a diagnosis.

GENETICS 571 — CLINICAL PRACTICE I

1 credit.

Clinical practicum to develop diagnostic expertise involving the microscopic examination of routine gynecologic specimens (Pap smears). Observe the signout of abnormal cytologic specimens by cytopathologist staff.

GENETICS 572 — THE RESPIRATORY SYSTEM

3 credits.

Anatomy, histology, physiology and pathology of the respiratory tract and the corresponding cellular manifestations which provide diagnostic information. Cell changes related to specimen processing. Correlation of the didactic information with the microscopic cellular patterns to provide a diagnosis.

GENETICS 573 — THE GENITOURINARY SYSTEM

2 credits.

Anatomy, physiology, histology and pathology of the urinary tract and male reproductive systems and the corresponding cellular manifestations which provide diagnostic information. Cell changes related to specimen processing. Correlation of didactic information with microscopic cell patterns to provide a diagnosis.

GENETICS 574 — THE GASTROINTESTINAL SYSTEM

3 credits.

Anatomy, histology, physiology and pathology of the gastrointestinal system and the corresponding cellular manifestations which provide diagnostic information. Cell changes related to specimen processing. Correlation of the didactic information with the microscopic cellular patterns to provide a diagnosis.

GENETICS 575 — MISCELLANEOUS SYSTEMS

3 credits.

Anatomy, histology, physiology and pathology of skin, thyroid, lymph nodes and other sites and the corresponding celluular manifestations which provide diagnostic information. Emphasis on specimen collection by fine needle aspiration. Correlation of the didactic information with the microscopic cellular patterns to provide a diagnosis.

GENETICS 576 — EFFUSIONS

2 credits.

Anatomy, physiology, histology and pathology of the body cavities. Cytologic manifestations which provide diagnostic information. Cell changes related to specimen processing. Correlation of the didactic information with the microscopic cellular patterns to provide a diagnosis.

GENETICS 577 — APPLIED CYTOLOGY I

1 credit.

Written and practical application of the comprehensive body of knowledge to all aspects of preparation, evaluation, correlation and diagnosis of cytologic speciments.

GENETICS 578 — APPLIED CYTOLOGY II

1 credit.

Written and practical application of the advanced comprehensive body of knowledge to all aspects of preparation, evaluation, correlation and diagnosis of cytologic specimens. Practice in nationally offered cytologic examinations.

GENETICS/​MICROBIO  607 — ADVANCED MICROBIAL GENETICS

3 credits.

Molecular genetic methods and related aspects of prokaryotic and lower eukaryotic biology, as well as critical analysis of the scientific literature. Approximately two-thirds of the course will focus on prokaryotes and one-third on lower eukaryotic microbes.

GENETICS/​AN SCI  610 — QUANTITATIVE GENETICS

3 credits.

An advanced approach with emphasis on statistical foundations. Classical theory with extensions to maternal and paternal effects. Selection theory is considered in depth.

GENETICS/​BIOCHEM/​MICROBIO  612 — PROKARYOTIC MOLECULAR BIOLOGY

3 credits.

Molecular basis of bacterial physiology and genetics with emphasis on molecular mechanisms; topics include nucleic acid-protein interactions, transcription, translation, replication, recombination, regulation of gene expression.

GENETICS/​BIOCHEM/​MD GENET  620 — EUKARYOTIC MOLECULAR BIOLOGY

3 credits.

This course focuses on the basic molecular mechanisms that regulate DNA, RNA, and protein metabolism in eukaryotic organisms. This course is intended for advanced undergraduates and first year graduate students with a firm knowledge of basic biochemistry.

GENETICS/​ENTOM/​ZOOLOGY  624 — MOLECULAR ECOLOGY

3 credits.

Basic principles of molecular ecology. Lecture topics include population genetics, molecular phylogenetics, rates and patterns of evolution, genome evolution, and molecular ecology.

GENETICS/​CHEM  626 — GENOMIC SCIENCE

2 credits.

This course is designed to bring cutting-edge topics in the genomic sciences into the reach of traditionally "pure" chemistry, biology, engineering, computer science statistics students. It is also designed for enabling biologically-oriented students to deal with the advances in analytical science so that they may incorporate new genomic science concepts into their own scientific repertoires. Intended for graduate students and for undergraduates with extensive research experience.

GENETICS 627 — ANIMAL DEVELOPMENTAL GENETICS

3 credits.

Advanced Genetics course focusing on genetic mechanisms of animal embryonic development, with particular emphasis on central molecular circuitries that control development and genetic analytical tools used to reveal them. Using a combination of lectures and primary research literature reading/student-led seminars, we will address topics including maternal and epigenetic inheritance, the egg-to-embryo transition, pattern formation, organogenesis, coordination of cellular and molecular mechanisms, and animal models of human congenital disorders. ZOOLOGY 470 is recommended

GENETICS/​BOTANY/​MD GENET  629 — EVOLUTIONARY GENETICS

3 credits.

Basic principles of phylogenetics, population genetics and quantitative genetics including the construction of gene trees, forces affecting the amount and distribution of genetic variation in populations, and the inheritance and evolution of multifactorial characters. Knowledge of intro calc stats or cons inst

GENETICS 631 — PLANT GENETICS

2 credits.

This is a graduate-level course in plant genetics. We will cover the basic concepts of genetics and genomics as applied to plants, including discussions on breeding systems (modes of reproduction, sex determination, self incompatibility and crossing barriers), linkage analysis, genome structure and function (structure, function and evolution of nuclear and organellar chromosomes; haploidy and polyploidy; expression regulation and epigenetics), and a description of current methodologies used in the analysis of these processes. Our objective is to instigate in students a broader knowledge and understanding of the principles and methodologies used in plant genetics such that they can adopt them most effectively in their own research projects, and can describe and discuss them more thoroughly with the general public. This course is based on lectures and in-class discussions of assigned readings..

GENETICS 633 — POPULATION GENETICS

3 credits.

This is a graduate-level(and upper-level undergraduate) course in population genetics, aimed at preparing students to initiate research in this field. We will explore how genetic variation is influenced by mutation and recombination, population size changes and migration, and natural selection for or against new mutations. Undergraduates who have completed GENETICS 468, GENETICS 466, or BIOCORE 587 may contact the instructors to discuss the appropriateness of this course for their curriculum.

GENETICS/​BOTANY/​ZOOLOGY  645 — MODELING IN POPULATION GENETICS AND EVOLUTION

3 credits.

Introduction to mathematical techniques and approaches for predicting evolutionary change within populations. Concentrates on classic population genetic models and results, including selection on one and several loci; mutation; non-random mating; drift. Evaluation based on periodic problem sets and independent projects.

GENETICS/​BOTANY/​M M & I/​MICROBIO/​PL PATH  655 — BIOLOGY AND GENETICS OF FILAMENTOUS FUNGI

3-4 credits.

Fungal genetics, genomics, and physiology using plant pathogenic fungi and the genetic models Aspergillus nidulans and Neurospora crassa as model systems to explore the current knowledge of fungal genetics and plant/fungal interactions.

GENETICS 660 — EVOLUTIONARY GENOMICS

2 credits.

We will present and discuss modern topics in evolutionary genomics, including genomic approaches, their application to evolutionary biology, and insights gleaned from such studies. Topics include evolution of genome architecture, gene content, and sequences. The course also covers molecular evolution as applied to the genome scale.

GENETICS 662 — CANCER GENETICS

2 credits.

Cancer remains one of the most difficult health issues facing our society. There is hope in the horizon due to an increasing understanding of both genetic and epigenetic alterations in cancer. In particular, DNA sequencing of human cancers is becoming more common in major health care centers, and there is expectation that this technology will allow for personalized medicine. Thus, there has been a rapid increase in this knowledge over the last decade. It is expected that students will become aware of the current major issues in cancer research and will be able to critically evaluate the cancer genetics literature.

GENETICS 670 — SEMINAR IN CLINICAL CYTOGENETICS

1 credit.

Overview of the basic features of chromosome structure and behavior including karyotyping clinical correlates of numerical and structural chromosome aberrations, sex chromosome abnormalities, breakage syndromes and the chromosomal changes associated with the development of cancer.

GENETICS 671 — ADVANCED CLINICAL PRACTICE

8 credits.

Clinical practicum to develop diagnostic expertise of cytologic specimens. Examine challenging cases with emphasis on diagnostic pitfalls. Observe patient clinics related to cytologic specimen collection. Participate at clinical experiences in fine needle aspiration, histology, and a private cytology laboratory.

GENETICS 672 — SEMINAR IN LABORATORY OPERATIONS AND QUALITY CONTROL

1 credit.

Review the fundamentals of basic administrative functions and regulatory requirements including planning, organizing, supervising and controlling business management, record keeping, data processing and laboratory safety. Quality assurance procedures necessary for obtaining, processing, diagnosing and reporting cytologic specimens.

GENETICS 673 — SEMINAR IN CLINICAL CYTOLOGY

1 credit.

Preparation of a case study or clinical topic of choice by each student to present to a peer professional group of cytology staff and medical faculty. Preparation of a referenced scientific term paper or participation in an approved research or class project pertaining to cliniccal cytology.

GENETICS/​MD GENET  677 — ADVANCED TOPICS IN GENETICS

1-3 credits.

Contents vary; consideration of subjects not included in the curriculum.

GENETICS 681 — SENIOR HONORS THESIS

2-4 credits.

GENETICS 682 — SENIOR HONORS THESIS

2-4 credits.

Continuation of 681.

GENETICS 699 — SPECIAL PROBLEMS

1-3 credits.

Advanced work not covered in regular courses.

GENETICS 701 — ADVANCED GENETICS

3 credits.

Advanced Genetics is the first semester course of a 2-semester core series (GENETICS 701 and GENETICS 702) for first-year graduate students in the Genetics doctoral degree program. This series provides professional level training in genetic mechanisms and analysis as applied to genetic transmission, gene expression, forward and reverse genetics, population and quantitative genetics, molecular genetics, genomics, developmental genetics and epigenetics. Lectures are coupled with assigned readings of peer-reviewed literature that serve as the basis for graded in-class presentations and discussion, homework questions and essays.

GENETICS 702 — ADVANCED GENETICS II

3 credits.

Advanced Genetics II is the second semester course of a 2-semester core series for first-year graduate students in the Genetics doctoral degree program. This series provides professional level training in genetic mechanisms and analysis as applied to genetic transmission, gene expression, forward and reverse genetics, population and quantitative genetics, molecular genetics, genomics, developmental genetics and epigenetics. Lectures are coupled with assigned readings of peer-reviewed literature that serve as the basis for graded in-class presentations and discussion, homework questions and essays.

GENETICS/​BIOCHEM  703 — TOPICS IN EUKARYOTIC REGULATION

2 credits.

Design and interpretation of experiments addressing molecular mechanisms of eukaryotic regulation. For first year graduate students with firm knowledge of basic biochemistry, molecular biology and genetics.

GENETICS/​MD GENET  708 — METHODS AND LOGIC IN GENETIC ANALYSIS

3 credits.

Contemporary issues in genetic, developmental, cell, and molecular biology are addressed in a discussion format. Invited speakers give researech lectures and reading material is taken from the primary literature. The discussion fucuses on evaluating genetic approaches to biological problems.

GENETICS/​MD GENET/​NURSING/​PEDIAT  731 — ADVANCED CLINICAL GENETICS CONCEPTS

3 credits.

An advanced course covering clinical genetic concepts including phenotype, genetic mechanisms, approach to diagnosis (medical, clinical and genetic testing protocols), and natural history (including management approaches). While specific for Genetic Counselor Studies students other healthcare providers are allowed if they have sufficient genetic background knowledge.

GENETICS/​BOTANY/​ENTOM/​ZOOLOGY  820 — FOUNDATIONS OF EVOLUTION

2 credits.

Through reading and analysis of the primary literature, this course will explore some of the most important themes and debates that have permeated evolutionary biology over the last 50 years. Students will read key papers related to each controversial topic, will debate the pros and cons of competing viewpoints, and will reflect on the relevance of the issues to contemporary evolutionary biology. Students will also write a paper that analyzes one topic in more detail. This course is intended for graduate students who plan to specialize in evolutionary biology, broadly construed.

GENETICS/​BIOCHEM/​BOTANY  840 — REGULATORY MECHANISMS IN PLANT DEVELOPMENT

3 credits.

Molecular mechanisms whereby endogenous and environmental regulatory factors control development; emphasis on stimulus perception and primary events in the signal chain leading to modulated gene expression and cellular development; lecture.

GENETICS/​AN SCI/​POP HLTH  849 — GENETIC EPIDEMIOLOGY

3 credits.

This course will provide an introduction to genetic epidemiology. Topics will include a general overview of genetics and Mendelian and complex inheritance, as well as various elements of study design, including participant ascertainment; phenotype definition; biologic sample selection; genotyping, sequencing, and quality control; measurement of covariates, and choice of analytic methods. We will briefly discuss some of the original study designs and then focus on current study designs for the remainder of the class. Additional emerging topics will be briefly touched upon. Students will complete short homework assignments to enforce concepts learned during lectures, discuss journal articles, and prepare a very short grant application for the mid-term project. In the final weeks of class, students will work together to analyze data from a real genetic study, prepare tables, interpret the findings, and present their project to their peers.

GENETICS 875 — SPECIAL TOPICS

1-4 credits.

Special topics of current interest to graduate students.

GENETICS 885 — ADVANCED GENOMIC AND PROTEOMIC ANALYSIS

3 credits.

With the availability of genome sequences and high-throughput techniques, organismal physiology can now be examined on a global scale by monitoring the behavior of all genes or proteins in a single experiment. This course will present modern techniques in genomics and proteomics, with particular focus on analyzing the data generated by these techniques. Course material will cover genomic sequencing, comparative sequence analysis, phylogeny construction and phylogenomics, transcription factor motif discovery, DNA microarray analysis, techniques in mass spectrometry, proteomic screening methods, and protein-interaction network analysis. In addition to lecture time, the course consists of a 2-hour per week computer lab where students get hands-on experience analyzing genomic and proteomic datasets. In addition, students conduct a semester-long computational project of their choice that uses multiple computational methods discussed in class. Class enrollment is limited to 20 students due to computer lab space.

GENETICS/​MD GENET/​POP HLTH  888 — PUBLIC HEALTH GENOMICS

1 credit.

Public health genomics uses knowledge gained from genetic and molecular research along with a consideration of ethical, legal, and social implications (ELSI) to prevent disease and improve the health of the population. Students enrolled in this course will be provided an introduction to public health genomics through a review of fundamental principles of genetics, followed by lectures and discussions on the use of genetic information in clinical and research settings and its implications for disease management and prevention. Students will also gain an awareness of policies that guide public health and will be able to discuss current ethical, legal, and social implications of these policies. These learning objectives will be met through readings and videos, lectures, and discussions of recent journal articles and current topics in public health genomics.

GENETICS/​B M E/​B M I/​BIOCHEM/​CBE/​COMP SCI  915 — COMPUTATION AND INFORMATICS IN BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE

1 credit.

Participants and outside speakers will discuss current research in computation and informatics in biology and medicine. This seminar is required of all CIBM program trainees.

GENETICS/​AN SCI/​DY SCI  951 — SEMINAR IN ANIMAL BREEDING

1 credit.

GENETICS/​AGRONOMY/​HORT  957 — SEMINAR-PLANT BREEDING

1 credit.

GENETICS 990 — RESEARCH

1-12 credits.

GENETICS 993 — SEMINAR IN GENETICS

1 credit.

Sections deal with various aspects of genetics: Drosophila, maize, immunogenetics, developmental genetics, or other special topics. Students may enroll in two or more sections if they wish.