PSYCH/​SOC  160 — HUMAN SEXUALITY: SOCIAL AND PSYCHOLOGICAL ISSUES

3-4 credits.

Biological, psychological and sociological aspects of sexual relationships and behavior. The course presents theoretical and empirical materials on sexuality throughout the life-course, including childhood, adolescence, adulthood, and later life. Attention is given to gender, religion, education and the law as they relate to sexual expression in society.

PSYCH 201 — INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY

4 credits.

Behavior, including its development, motivation, frustrations, emotion, intelligence, learning, forgetting, personality, language, thinking, and social behavior; lectures and discussions. Not open to students who have taken PSYCH 202 or 281

PSYCH 202 — INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY

3-4 credits.

Behavior, including its development, motivation, frustrations, emotion, intelligence, learning, forgetting, personality, language, thinking, and social behavior.

PSYCH 210 — BASIC STATISTICS FOR PSYCHOLOGY

3 credits.

Measures of central tendency, variability; probability, sampling distributions; hypothesis testing, confidence intervals; t-tests; Chi-square; regression and correlation (linear) and introduction to analysis of variance (1-way).

PSYCH 211 — FRESHMAN SEMINAR IN PSYCHOLOGY

3 credits.

The course will introduce students to research methods, theories, findings and current controversies in a focused area of psychology. See Timetable for topics.

PSYCH 225 — RESEARCH METHODS

4 credits.

General characteristics of scientific method; use of experimental, observational, and correlational research designs; research methods used in psychological science; illustration of core issues in research methods taken from several areas of psychology; lecture, demonstration, and experiments.

PSYCH 280 — HONORS BASIC STATISTICS FOR PSYCHOLOGY

4 credits.

PSYCH 281 — HONORS COURSE-INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY

4 credits.

PSYCH 285 — HONORS COURSE - RESEARCH METHODS

4 credits.

General characteristics of scientific method; use of experimental, observational, and correlational research designs; research methods used in psychological science; illustration of core issues in research methods taken from several areas of psychology; lecture, demonstration, and experiments.

PSYCH 310 — TOPICS IN PSYCHOLOGY: STUDY ABROAD

1-6 credits.

A course carried with a UW-Madison Study Abroad Program which has no equivalent on this campus.

PSYCH 311 — ISSUES IN PSYCHOLOGY

1-4 credits.

Topics vary with the instructor. Survey of topical issues. May be repeated.

PSYCH 325 — EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS

4 credits.

Experimental research techniques and methodology as applied to various areas of psychology; lectures, lab experiments. Grad level of 225.

PSYCH/​I SY E  349 — INTRODUCTION TO HUMAN FACTORS

3 credits.

This course conveys the importance of considering human capabilities and limits in system design and operation. This includes understanding human characteristics from the cognitive, physical, and psychosocial perspectives. Implications of these characteristics are explored through understanding the needs of people, designing to support these needs, and evaluating systems to ensure they serve the intended purpose. Case studies are used to identify the human role in accidents and to identify design improvements. Application domains include consumer product design, human-computer interaction, workplace safety, and complex systems such as healthcare delivery. Concurrent registration in ISyE 348 is required for ISyE majors.

PSYCH/​SOC  350 — HUMAN SEXUALITY

4 credits.

Provides an interdisciplinary introduction to biological, psychological, and sociological aspects of human sexuality. Not open to students who have taken Soc/PSYCH/​SOC  160

PSYCH 386 — TOPICS IN PSYCHOLOGY FOR HONORS STUDENTS

1 credit.

Current topics for honors students in psychology. Faculty will lead lecture/discussions about a wide range of topics such as child development, clinical psychology, perception, physiological psychology, and human learning.

PSYCH 399 — SERVICE LEARNING IN PSYCHOLOGY

1-4 credits.

An independent study course to provide students with opportunities to gain experience in community service work relevant to psychology.

PSYCH 405 — ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY

3-4 credits.

A survey course of psychopathology. In this breadth course, we will discuss the diagnosis and treatment of the major mental disorders. We will also consider the current thinking regarding the biological, psychological, and sociocultural factors that play contributing roles in the etiology and maintenance of these disorders. Historical trends as well as advances in neuroscience will be considered in terms of how they have affected our understanding of psychopathology.

PSYCH 406 — PSYCHOLOGY OF PERCEPTION

3-4 credits.

Survey the current knowledge about how the brain creates our conscious experience of a surrounding world and of our own bodies. We will consider contributions from various approaches, including neurophysiology, psychophysics, computer simulations, perceptual illusions, and patient studies.

PSYCH 408 — PSYCHOLOGY OF HUMAN EMOTIONS

3 credits.

Influence of emotions on goals, customs, interests, learning, reasoning, and behavior problems in children and adults.

PSYCH 412 — FIELD EXPERIENCE IN PSYCHOLOGY

3 credits.

Provides an opportunity for students to gain practical experience in the application of psychology in an organization serving social, mental health, educational, biological psychology, developmental, or industrial/organizational interests. Readings and discussions in the application of psychology will be required. Individual courses may be required for some placements

PSYCH 413 — LANGUAGE, MIND, AND BRAIN

3-4 credits.

Cognitive processes and brain mechanisms underlying language use. Topics include language acquisition, production, comprehension, bilingualism, human vs. computer speech perception, reading and dyslexia, human language vs. animal communication, aphasia and other language impairments, and the relationship between language and thought.

PSYCH 414 — COGNITIVE PSYCHOLOGY

3-4 credits.

The course attempts to answer questions about how people perceive, learn, remember, plan, solve problems, make decisions, and communicate. Although the main approach is psychological, we will also consider contributions from computer science, linguistics, and neurobiology.

PSYCH 430 — HISTORY OF PSYCHOLOGY

3 credits.

Theoretical and systematic psychology as represented by British empiricism, structuralism, functionalism, dynamic psychology, behaviorism, gestalt psychology, and psychoanalysis; implications for current trends in theory and systems.

PSYCH 449 — ANIMAL BEHAVIOR

3-4 credits.

Evolutionary and physiological mechanisms of animal behavior including aggressive, reproductive, communicative, and social behaviors, behavioral development.

PSYCH 450 — PRIMATES AND US: INSIGHTS INTO HUMAN BIOLOGY AND BEHAVIOR

3 credits.

Evolution from monkey to humans of intelligence, social behavior, emotion, growth, and bodily structure.

PSYCH 454 — BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE

3-4 credits.

Biological basis of human and animal behaviors, including perception, action, cognition, social interaction and disease. Weekly themes from "Cracking the Neural Code" to "Love and War". Students learn, develop and use neural mechanisms to explain and (attempt to) predict what they and others think and do in all facets of life."

PSYCH 455 — LABORATORY IN BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE

1 credit.

Introduction to research techniques and experimental methods of physiological psychology. Emphasis on the surgical, histological and electrophysiological techniques for studying the neural mechanisms of behavior.

PSYCH/​SOC  456 — INTRODUCTORY SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY

3-4 credits.

The systematic study of the individual in a social context, including social interaction, motivation, attitudes, conformity, communication, leadership, personal relationships, and behavior in small groups.

PSYCH 460 — DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY

3-4 credits.

Biological and behavioral foundations of human development, with an emphasis on experiments and data-driven approaches. Topics will include prenatal development, behavior genetics, motor development, perceptual development, language development, cognitive development, emotional development, social development, and atypical development.

PSYCH 464 — ADULT DEVELOPMENT AND AGING

3 credits.

Physical, cognitive, social, and personality development during the adult years.

PSYCH 481 — HONORS SEMINAR IN COGNITIVE PSYCHOLOGY

1-2 credits.

Students will read and discuss the professional literature in selected areas of cognitive psychology and cognitive science more generally. There will be opportunities to conduct library research, laboratory research, or construct computer simulations of cognitive processes.

PSYCH 483 — HONORS-LANGUAGE, MIND, AND BRAIN

1 credit.

Cognitive processes and research methods used to study language. Students will read and discuss professional literature in the areas of language acquisition, production, comprehension, bilingualism, the relationship between language and thought and other topics. Emphasis on brain bases of language.

PSYCH 484 — HONORS-BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCES

1 credit.

Physiological mechanisms and research methods used to study motor behavior; sensation and perception; complex motivated behaviors such as reproduction, eating, and sleep; learning; language; emotion; and psychopathological and neurological disorders.

PSYCH 486 — HONORS: PSYCHOLOGY OF PERCEPTION

1 credit.

Students will read and discuss the professional literature in selected areas of perceptual sciences. There will be opportunities to conduct library and laboratory research, or construct computer simulations of perceptual processes.

PSYCH 487 — HONORS ANIMAL BEHAVIOR

4 credits.

Honors course on the mechanisms and function of behavior of animals and the relationship between behavior of human and nonhuman animals.

PSYCH 488 — HONORS PSYCHOLOGY OF HUMAN EMOTIONS

3 credits.

An examination of five theoretical approaches to emotion. Study of facial expression, physiology, appraisal, and the lexicon of emotion as well as some cross cultural factors.

PSYCH 501 — DEPTH TOPIC

4 credits.

Provides an in-depth treatment of a specific topic in psychology, in a format that includes both lecture and discussion.

PSYCH 502 — COGNITIVE DEVELOPMENT

4 credits.

Covers the basics of cognitive development during childhood. Topics include theoretical approaches to cognitive development; perceptual, language, memory, and conceptual development; social cognition; problem solving, and academic performance.

PSYCH 503 — SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT

4 credits.

Explores how infants and children perceive, think about, and interact with the social world. Topics include theory of mind, emotions, early social relationships, peer influences, morality and pro-social behavior, aggression, and social categorization.

PSYCH 504 — AFFECTIVE NEUROSCIENCE

4 credits.

Focuses on the neural basis of emotion, including how the brain analyzes incoming sensory information, categorizes its motivational value, and initiates an ecologically appropriate response.

PSYCH 507 — PSYCHOLOGY OF PERSONALITY

3 credits.

Organization and development of the personality.

PSYCH 508 — PSYCHOLOGY OF HUMAN EMOTIONS: FROM BIOLOGY TO CULTURE

4 credits.

Emotional experience affects and defines every facet of our life, but it seems mysterious and unsuitable for scientific inquiry. This course shows how and why Emotion is not unsuited to scientific research. The Psychology of Human Emotion provides an in-depth examination of research from all sub-disciplines of the field of Psychology. This includes neuroscience and the biological bases of behavior, questions of the developmental curve for emotional phenomena and the relationship between feeling and thinking, all the way to the study of social groups and culture. Readings and discussion attempt to integrate existent theory and research and apply their implications to the individual, the group, and society. Students who have completed PSYCH 408 or 488 are not eligible to enroll for this course

PSYCH 511 — BEHAVIOR PATHOLOGY: NEUROSES

3 credits.

The nature, origins, assessment and treatment of neurotic, characterological, and psychosomatic behavioral abnormalities and psychopathology in adults and children. Those who take 511 may not receive credit for 509

PSYCH 512 — BEHAVIOR PATHOLOGY-PSYCHOSES

3 credits.

The nature, origins, assessment and treatment of psychotic and organic behavioral abnormalities; emphasis on the experimental analysis of Psychopathology.

PSYCH 513 — HORMONES, BRAIN, AND BEHAVIOR

4 credits.

Complex social behavior emerges from the interplay of hormones, the brain and environmental signals. This course is structured to introduce psychology and neurobiology students to how hormones and neurotransmitters shape brain and behavior in animals and humans. We will review the mechanisms by which hormones shape brain sex differences and its consequences on juvenile (i.e. play) and adult behavior. We will discuss how hormones influence sexual behavior using basic animal models, and extend this to human sex differences, including sexual orientation. Additional topics include how hormones shape competitive and affiliative behaviors, eating disorders, and stress and mental health. We will also discuss how individual variation occurs in response to the changing environment and genetic landscape, including epigenetics at an introductory level.

PSYCH 520 — HOW WE READ: THE SCIENCE OF READING AND ITS EDUCATIONAL IMPLICATIONS

4 credits.

Reading is one of the most advanced expressions of human intelligence, involving language, vision, memory, learning, thinking and other capacities. This course is an in-depth introduction to scientific studies of reading, which examine how reading relates to spoken language, how people learn to read, the processes involved in skilled reading, the causes of reading impairments (dyslexia), and the brain bases of reading. The course will also examine whether this science can help to address America's literacy problem. Many people (about 30% of the population) are unable to read or read poorly. How can reading science be brought to bear on this problem, which is of enormous importance to both the affected individuals and society? Students who have completed Psych 402 or 482 are not eligible to enroll for this course

PSYCH 521 — THE STRUCTURE OF HUMAN THOUGHT: CONCEPTS, LANGUAGE AND CULTURE

4 credits.

This class will take you on a tour of how humans conceptualize the world, focusing on the role of language in thought. We will begin by discussing the evolution of language and how it relates to other communication systems used by humans and nonhuman animals. We will then discuss the relationship between language, culture, and cognition in domains as varied as mathematics, visual perception, spatial navigation, and theory of mind. In the process, we will tackle questions such as: What is the role of language in making us human? Can speaking a particular language allow the speakers to better adapt to their environment? Can we create new languages to improve human thought? We will also address such issues as metaphors in political discourse and propaganda, and the role of information technologies in the spread of ideas. This class will draw heavily on empirical research in cognitive and developmental psychology as well as neuroscience.

PSYCH/​GEN&WS  522 — PSYCHOLOGY OF WOMEN AND GENDER

3 credits.

Examination of theories and research on the psychology of women and gender. Explores topics such as sex bias in psychological research; psychological aspects of female sexuality and reproduction; gender-based violence; female achievement and power; lifestyle choices of women; women and mental health; and psychological research with transgender individuals.

PSYCH/​ZOOLOGY  523 — NEUROBIOLOGY

3 credits.

Basic mechanisms in cellular neurophysiology: electrophysiology and chemistry of nerve signals, mechanisms in integration, simple nervous pathways and their behavioral correlates. We highly recommend entering students have a strong background in the principles of basic electricity (charge, voltage, current, resistance, capacitance), as provided by PHYSICS 104, 202, 208, or a strong high school physics program.

PSYCH/​NTP/​PHYSIOL/​ZOOLOGY  524 — NEUROBIOLOGY II: AN INTRODUCTION TO THE BRAIN AND BEHAVIOR

3 credits.

An introduction to studies of the human nervous system covering neuroanatomy of the brain, neuronal coding, sensory and motor systems, biological rhythms, arousal, attention, physiological regulation, reward, aversion, learning and memory.

PSYCH 526 — THE CRIMINAL MIND: FORENSIC AND PSYCHOBIOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVES

4 credits.

Criminal behavior is an extremely common and costly problem for society. The goal of the course is to provide an indepth understanding of criminal psychology and the relevant forensic and psychobiological processes in the field.

PSYCH 528 — INTRODUCTION TO CULTURAL PSYCHOLOGY

3 credits.

Cultural underpinning of psychological processes. The course will cover cultural influences on a wide range of psychological processes, including self-perception, motivation, relationship, cognition and perception, and will also deal with acculturation, within-cultural differences and cultural stability and change.

PSYCH 532 — PSYCHOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF THE INTERNET

4 credits.

Googling the question, "How is the Internet changing the way we think?," renders no shortage of opinions - or fears. In this course, students will examine empirical evidence for whether the Internet is changing the way we learn, communicate, socialize, attend, develop, and age. Students will read and synthesize original research literature, which will be augmented with readings and videos from the popular press.

PSYCH/​I SY E  549 — HUMAN FACTORS ENGINEERING

3 credits.

Analysis and design of man-machine systems using human performance models and data. Emphasis on systems involving communication and control. Projects using digital and analog computer simulation techniques for system design.

PSYCH/​ZOOLOGY  550 — ANIMAL COMMUNICATION AND THE ORIGINS OF LANGUAGE

3 credits.

Signals, contexts, and mechanism of social communication in animals. Speech and non-verbal communication in human beings and possible arguments for the evolution of speech and language.

PSYCH 556 — HORMONES AND BEHAVIOR

3 credits.

A survey of human and subhuman research findings relating behavioral events to endocrine function. Topics include stress, psychosis, intellectual development, memory, gender-identity differentiation, reproductive behavior, aggression, preceded by a review of basic and clinical endocrinology.

PSYCH 580 — HONORS SEMINAR IN CHILD PSYCHOLOGY

1 credit.

PSYCH 581 — HONORS DEPTH TOPIC

4 credits.

Provides an in-depth treatment of a specific topic in psychology, in a format that includes both lecture and discussion.

PSYCH 582 — HONORS COGNITIVE DEVELOPMENT

4 credits.

Covers the basics of cognitive development during childhood. Topics include theoretical approaches to cognitive development; perceptual, language, memory, and conceptual development; social cognition; problem solving, and academic performance.

PSYCH 583 — HONORS SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT

4 credits.

Explores how infants and children perceive, think about, and interact with the social world. Topics include theory of mind, emotions, early social relationships, peer influences, morality and pro-social behavior, aggression, and social categorization.

PSYCH 584 — HONORS AFFECTIVE NEUROSCIENCE

4 credits.

Focuses on the neural basis of emotion, including how the brain analyzes incoming sensory information, categorizes its motivational value, and initiates an ecologically appropriate response.

PSYCH 585 — HONORS SEMINAR IN SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY

1 credit.

This course is an honors discussion to be taken in conjunction with Psych 530.

PSYCH 586 — HONORS SEMINAR: THE CRIMINAL MIND: FORENSIC AND PSYCHOBIOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVES

4 credits.

Criminal behavior is an extremely common and costly problem for society. The goal of the course is to provide an indepth understanding of criminal psychology and the relevant forensic and psychobiological processes in the field.

PSYCH 587 — HONORS SEMINAR IN ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY

1 credit.

This course will provide a more in-depth exploration of abnormal psychology. It is intended to supplement the introductory Abnormal Psychology course (Psych 509).

PSYCH 588 — INTRODUCTION TO CULTURAL PSYCHOLOGY - HONORS

1 credit.

This honors seminar will serve to supplement the lecture course, Introduction to Cultural Psychology. It will allow students to delve more deeply into the issues discussed in the lecture by reading and evaluating empirical articles central to cultural psychology.

PSYCH 601 — CURRENT TOPICS IN PSYCHOLOGY

3 credits.

Special topics in Psychology at the advanced undergraduate level. May be repeated for credit with different titles.

PSYCH 602 — INTERMEDIATE STATISTICS FOR PSYCHOLOGY

3 credits.

Principles of psychological measurement and test theory, including reliability, validity, and test construction. Introduction to correlation, multiple regression, factor analysis, and other data analytic principles.

PSYCH 607 — INTRODUCTION TO CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY

3 credits.

Methods, rationale, and empirical foundations of clinical psychology. Emphasis is on therapy and behavior modification. Intended for advanced undergraduate majors and non clinical graduate students.

PSYCH 610 — STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF PSYCHOLOGICAL EXPERIMENTS

3 credits.

Statistical analysis of data obtained with various experimental designs, Chi-square, analysis of variance and covariance, factorial and repeated-measures, Latin and Greco-Latin square designs, tests of trend.

PSYCH/​ANATOMY/​NTP/​PHMCOL-M/​PHYSIOL  611 — SYSTEMS NEUROSCIENCE

4 credits.

Introduction to the anatomy and physiology of the mammalian nervous system. Lectures will cover the neuroanatomy of the major subdivisions of the human brain, the major sensory and motor systems, and higher order functions. Lab/discussion sections will emphasize readings from the primary literature and hands-on dissections.

PSYCH/​ANTHRO/​NTP/​ZOOLOGY  619 — BIOLOGY OF MIND

3 credits.

Origins and structures of mind, brain, and consciousness. Transitions from early mammalian through primate to hominid intelligence. Genetics and plasticity in brain development. Modern studies of human brain mechanisms and consciousness.

PSYCH 620 — CAPSTONE MENTORED RESEARCH AND SEMINAR

1-6 credits.

In this course, students will develop an understanding of primary research in a topic area and will participate in designing and conducting research that challenges and/or extends current understanding of the topic. Course reading will include published research studies relevant to the selected topic, and evaluation will include presentations in group meetings and or a paper based on the research conducted.

PSYCH 621 — MENTORED RESEARCH AND SEMINAR

1-6 credits.

In this course, students will develop an understanding of primary research in a topic area and will participate in designing and conducting research that challenges and/or extends current understanding of the topic. Course reading will include published research studies relevant to the selected topic, and evaluation will include presentations in group meetings and or a paper based on the research conducted.

PSYCH/​I SY E  652 — SOCIOTECHNICAL SYSTEMS

3 credits.

Sociotechnical systems theory with applications to the design of organizations and jobs. Open systems and organizational environments. Analysis of the technical and social systems and techniques for "whole" system consideration. Organizational design strategy. Field site analyses by student teams.

PSYCH/​I SY E  653 — ORGANIZATION AND JOB DESIGN

3 credits.

Design of productive organizations and people's roles within them. Issues including boundary location, organizational decision levels, autonomous work groups, implementation and diffusion. Roles of the union. Case studies.

PSYCH/​NEURODPT/​ZOOLOGY  674 — BEHAVIORAL NEUROENDOCRINOLOGY SEMINAR

2 credits.

Behavior results from a complex interplay among hormones, the brain, and environmental factors. Behaviors and their underlying neural substrates have evolved in response to specific environmental conditions, resulting in vast species diversity in behavioral and neuroendocrine solutions to environmental problems. This seminar is designed to explore the primary literature on the neuroendocrine underpinnings of behavior spanning from feeding to sex differences in complex social behaviors. A range of taxonomic groups will be discussed, including (but not limited to) mammals, birds, and fish. A background in neuroscience and/or endocrinology is strongly recommended.

PSYCH 681 — SENIOR HONORS THESIS

3 credits.

PSYCH 682 — SENIOR HONORS THESIS

3 credits.

PSYCH 686 — HONORS SEMINAR IN PSYCHOLOGY

1 credit.

PSYCH 691 — UNDERGRADUATE THESIS

1-6 credits.

Undergraduate research including completion of a thesis. Recommended for those intending to do graduate work in psychology.

PSYCH 692 — UNDERGRADUATE THESIS

1-6 credits.

Continuation of 691.

PSYCH 693 — ANIMAL BEHAVIOR PROBLEMS

1-12 credits.

Repeatable to a maximum of 12 credits. Individual experimental studies.

PSYCH 694 — PROBLEMS IN DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY

1-12 credits.

Repeatable to a maximum of 12 credits. Independent problems under supervision.

PSYCH 695 — PROBLEMS IN CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY

1-12 credits.

Repeatable to a maximum of 12 credits. Individual experimental studies.

PSYCH 697 — PROBLEMS IN HUMAN BEHAVIOR

1-12 credits.

Repeatable to a maximum of 12 credits. Independent work under supervision.

PSYCH 699 — DIRECTED STUDY

1-3 credits.

PSYCH 701 — PROSEMINAR IN EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY

1 credit.

Introductions to various aspects of experimental psychology such as sensory, learning, motivation, and experimental methodology.

PSYCH 703 — PROSEMINAR IN SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY

1 credit.

Weekly discussion of current topics in social psychology, especially as illustrated by the planned and ongoing research of the graduate students and faculty in social psychology. Recent journal articles will also be discussed. Others with cons soc psych area group chair. Req of all grads in soc psych

PSYCH 704 — PROSEMINAR IN CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY

1 credit.

Research and theoretical presentations by all class members as well as discussions and research critiques. Discussion of research articles. Six semesters of this course are required for all clinical graduate students.

PSYCH 706 — PROSEMINAR IN DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY

1 credit.

Weekly discussion of current topics in developmental psychology, especially as illustrated by the planned and ongoing research of the graduate students and faculty in developmental psychology. Recent journal articles will also be discussed.

PSYCH 707 — PROSEMINAR IN BIOLOGICAL PSYCHOLOGY (PERCEPTION/BIOLOGY OF BRAIN & BEHAVIOR)

1 credit.

Topical research-oriented presentations and discussions in the area of biological psychology. Each week the seminar will be led by a faculty member or advanced student in the biological psychology area group of the Department of Psychology.

PSYCH 710 — DESIGN AND ANALYSIS OF PSYCHOLOGICAL EXPERIMENTS

3 credits.

Structure of psychological experiments; measurement and control of variables in psychology; randomized, orthogonal, and balanced designs; trend analysis; distribution-free methods.

PSYCH 711 — CURRENT TOPICS IN PSYCHOLOGY

2-3 credits.

PSYCH 715 — LANGUAGE AND COGNITIVE DEVELOPMENT

3 credits.

The development of language and cognition with an emphasis on the review of research and theory.

PSYCH 728 — CLASSIC ISSUES IN SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY

3 credits.

A broad survey of theories and research from the field of social psychology. Areas may include: attitudes and attitude change, conformity and compliance, altruism, attribution theory.

PSYCH/​COUN PSY/​RP & SE  729 — ADVANCED SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY

3 credits.

Intensive examination of theoretical conceptions in contemporary social psychology, including learning-theoretic, reinforcement, incentive, cognitive, and psychodynamic approaches, and research in selected topic areas reflecting these approaches, such as aggression, attitude formation and change, conformity, limitation and modeling, interpersonal attraction, perception of others, prosocial behavior, and social influence.

PSYCH/​GEN&WS  732 — PSYCHOLOGY OF WOMEN

3 credits.

This course covers research and theory in psychology of women. Topics include nonsexist research methods, psychological gender differences, theories of moral development, women of color, mental health and feminist therapy, rape, sexual harassment, and public policy issues.

PSYCH 733 — PERCEPTUAL AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES

2 credits.

Lectures on current approaches to perceptual and cognitive sciences.

PSYCH 740 — CLINICAL I: ASSESSMENT, ETIOLOGY, AND TREATMENT

1 credit.

Lectures on current approaches to assessment, etiology, and treatment of topic material.

PSYCH 741 — CLINICAL II: ASSESSMENT, ETIOLOGY, AND TREATMENT

1 credit.

Lectures on current approaches to assessment, etiology and treatment of topic material.

PSYCH/​COMP SCI/​ED PSYCH  770 — HUMAN-COMPUTER INTERACTION

3 credits.

Principles of human-computer interaction (HCI); human subjects research methods and procedures, qualitative and quantitative data analysis; and semester-long research project situated in critical domains of HCI, including applications in ubiquitous, affective, assistive, social, and embodied computing.

PSYCH 776 — TEACHING OF PSYCHOLOGY

1-3 credits.

PSYCH 799 — INDEPENDENT READING

2-3 credits.

PSYCH 800 — COGNITIVE & NEUROPSYCHOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT FOR DIAGNOSIS

2 credits.

Introduction to the major approaches and techniques used in the psychological assessment of cognitive functioning of children, adolescents, and adults, with special emphasis on intellectual evaluation. Other cognitive areas to receive focus include; attention, memory, executive function, language, and academic achievement.

PSYCH 802 — ASSESSMENT OF PSYCHOPATHOLOGY & PERSONALITY

2 credits.

This course will introduce the use of structured and semi-structured interviews typically used in psychodiagnostic settings, including research. The assessment of major/common psychopathologies and personality diagnosis will be covered. Additionally, several of the most commonly used clinical self-report and personality measures will be introduced (e.g., PAI, MMPI, BASC).

PSYCH 803 — ADVANCED TECHNIQUES IN PSYCHOTHERAPY

3 credits.

This course will provide an overview of empirically supported psychotherapeutic movements and their associated history, philosophical underpinnings, and techniques. Students will be oriented toward the theoretical perspective, basic tenets, and the practical techniques/skills of each psychotherapy.

PSYCH 805 — FIELD WORK IN CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY

1-3 credits.

Supervised field work in practical clinical situations.

PSYCH 806 — PRINCIPLES OF PSYCHOTHERAPY RESEARCH

2 credits.

PSYCH 807 — INTRODUCTION TO CONDUCTING PSYCHOTHERAPY

3 credits.

This course will introduce and allow practice with the skills needed to conduct individual psychotherapy using a cognitive behavioral approach. The first half of the course focuses on interviewing skills, planning and initiating CBT interventions, and the administrative demands of clinical practice. The second half of the course involves conducting psychotherapy and participating in individual and group supervision of those therapeutic contacts. During supervision we will discuss the client's issues, goals, and progress, as well as the clinician's professional presentation, therapeutic approach and techniques, and communication skills.

PSYCH 809 — ETHICAL AND LEGAL ISSUES IN CLINICAL PRACTICE I

2 credits.

The purpose of this course is to provide an introduction to the legal and ethical issues inherent to the conduct and process of professional clinical psychology. To this end, the course will review selected theories of moral philosophy, the American Psychological Association (APA) Ethical Principles and Codes of Conduct for Psychologists, other APA Standards and Guidelines and Wisconsin legal statutes governing the practice of psychology. This course is integrated with group case discussions and students. Students are encouraged to use this as a forum to discuss ethical and legal issues pertinent to their ongoing clinical cases. Ethical Legal Issues in Clinical Practice I will focus on introducing ethical principles; Wisconsin statutes; ethics and legal obligations when clients report suicidal or homicidal thoughts/actions; reporting of neglect and abuse; and record keeping.

PSYCH 810 — CLINICAL SUPERVISION, CONSULTATION, & COMMUNITY PSYCHOLOGY I

2 credits.

Clinical Supervision, Consulation, Community Psychology I introduces students to supervision and consultation as unique practices. Students will increase their understanding of the purposes of clinical supervision and consultation, theoretical frameworks and models of supervision and consultation, the roles and relationships related to clinical supervision and consultation, and legal, ethical and multicultural issues associated with clinical supervision and consultation. Students will develop skills in building a working alliance with a supervisee; providing developmentally appropriate performance feedback; planning and communicating strategies to develop rapport and motivation to solve problems in clients; negotiation and mediation to reach consensus and move past barriers; understanding and appreciating the diverse cognitive, behavioral, and effective characteristics of supervisees; applying theoretical material to case presentations and related experiential activities.

PSYCH 811 — COGNITIVE BEHAVIOR THERAPY

1 credit.

This course examines the theory and practice of Cognitive-Behavior Therapy (CBT). Students will examine the core issues of CBT from both theoretical and applied perspectives through case conceptualization exercises, role-plays, and application of CBT exercises to themselves.

PSYCH 813 — ETHICAL AND LEGAL ISSUES IN CLINICAL PRACTICE II

2 credits.

The purpose of this course is to extend and deepen our discussion of a clinical psychologist's ethical and legal obligations. To this end, the course will review selected theories of moral philosophy, the American Psychological Association (APA) Ethical Principles and Codes of Conduct for Psychologists, other APA Standards and Guidelines and Wisconsin legal statutes governing the practice of psychology. This course is integrated with PRTC group case discussions. Students are encouraged to use this as a forum to discuss ethical and legal issues pertinent to their ongoing clinical cases. This course will focus on a more in depth examination of the ethical and legal responsibilities of psychotherapists; ethics in academic settings; liability and duties when supervising trainees; appropriate collegial and client relationships; forensic psychology; and the business of mental health including ethical marketing practices.

PSYCH/​B M I/​COMP SCI  841 — COMPUTATIONAL COGNITIVE SCIENCE

3 credits.

Studies the biological and computational basis of intelligence, by combining methods from cognitive science, artificial intelligence, machine learning, computational biology, and cognitive neuroscience.

PSYCH/​I SY E  854 — SPECIAL TOPICS IN ORGANIZATION DESIGN

1-3 credits.

PSYCH/​I SY E  859 — SPECIAL TOPICS IN HUMAN FACTORS ENGINEERING

1-3 credits.

PSYCH/​ANTHRO  906 — METHODS AND HYPOTHESIS-TESTING FOR BEHAVIORAL ECOLOGISTS

1-3 credits.

A detailed overview of field methods for behavioral ecologists, focusing specifically on behavioral and ecological sampling techniques. It addresses the challenging process of situating an empirical study within the context of theoretical paradigms.

PSYCH 910 — SEMINAR-PSYCHOMETRIC METHODS

2-3 credits.

PSYCH 913 — SEMINAR - HISTORY OF PSYCHOLOGY

2-3 credits.

Overview of the history of psychology and its relevance to current issues in the discipline.

PSYCH 916 — SEMINAR IN MATHEMATICAL PSYCHOLOGY

2-3 credits.

PSYCH 918 — SEMINAR-GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY

1-3 credits.

PSYCH 930 — SEMINAR-SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY

2-3 credits.

PSYCH/​ENTOM/​ZOOLOGY  950 — INTERDISCIPLINARY SEMINAR IN ANIMAL BEHAVIOR

1 credit.

Research methods in animal behavior studies in many disciplines.

PSYCH 954 — SEMINAR-PHYSIOLOGICAL PSYCHOLOGY

2-3 credits.

PSYCH 990 — RESEARCH

1-12 credits.

Independent experimental, observational, or statistical investigation under the supervision of a staff member.

PSYCH/​COUN PSY/​ED PSYCH/​RP & SE  995 — PREDOCTORAL INTERNSHIP

0 credits.

Registration for Ph.D. students who have successfully defended the dissertation and are in the process of completing the required predoctoral internship.