HDFS 299 — INDEPENDENT STUDY

1-3 credits.

Directed study projects for freshmen and sophomores as arranged with a faculty member.

HDFS 362 — DEVELOPMENT OF THE YOUNG CHILD

3 credits.

This course provides a basic foundation for understanding development from conception through middle childhood. Content includes theoretical foundations, research findings, and practical applications.

HDFS 363 — DEVELOPMENT FROM ADOLESCENCE TO OLD AGE

3 credits.

This course provides a basic foundation for understanding development from adolescence through old age. Content includes theoretical foundations, research findings, and practical applications.

HDFS 425 — RESEARCH METHODS IN HUMAN DEVELOPMENT AND FAMILY STUDIES

3 credits.

Basics of research design used in studying family studies and individual development over the life course. Quantitative and qualitative research designs, participatory action research, and evaluation research, how research informs intervention and prevention programs.

HDFS 464 — PLAY-DEVELOPMENT AND ROLE ACROSS THE LIFESPAN

3 credits.

The role and function of play (and playfulness) in promoting development across the lifespan.

HDFS/​CNSR SCI  465 — FAMILIES & POVERTY

3 credits.

This course introduces students to research at the intersection of family and poverty studies. We will learn how family behaviors vary by socioeconomic status; how romantic relationships, childbearing, and childrearing may be implicated in poverty; what the consequences of poverty are for family functioning and children; and about the role of policy in influencing families and poverty.

HDFS 469 — FAMILY AND COMMUNITY INFLUENCES ON THE YOUNG CHILD

3 credits.

Interaction of child in socialization settings, especially the family; socialization processes in the social system of child-family-community.

HDFS 471 — PARENT - CHILD RELATIONS

3 credits.

Parents' interaction with their children, programs for parents, and parents' interactions with other institutions.

HDFS 474 — RACIAL ETHNIC FAMILIES IN THE U.S.

3 credits.

Examines the diversity of family life and human development across and within racial ethnic groups in the United States as shaped by race, ethnicity, culture, biculturalism, and the social contexts of history, economics, immigration, and socio-political conditions.

HDFS 478 — DEVELOPMENT OF BLACK CHILDREN AND THEIR FAMILIES: RESEARCH AND POLICY

3 credits.

Developmental and social change issues related to Black American children and their families. Race-related socialization of children, early development in rural and urban Black families, exploration of theoretical paradigms, as well as the impact of social change on empirical research and theoretical perspectives.

HDFS 501 — SPECIAL TOPICS

1-3 credits.

Specialized subject matter of current interest to undergraduate students.

HDFS 516 — STRESS AND RESILIENCE IN FAMILIES ACROSS THE LIFESPAN

3 credits.

Examines family stress and resilience across the life cycle from psychological, sociological, and biosocial perspectives. Explores research relating to normative and non-normative family stress and resiliency factors. Topics include parenting, poverty, violence, work-family balance, aging, health and wellness and others.

HDFS 517 — COUPLE RELATIONSHIPS

3 credits.

Romantic relationships are universally desired, and individuals around the globe agree about what successful intimacy entails: we all want to be loved, supported, and cared for by partners we hold in high esteem. Nevertheless, intimate relationships can be difficult to form and maintain. This course covers a range of theoretical perspectives and methodologies to understand how it is that intimate relationships develop, thrive, or deteriorate over time. The course will also connect intimate relationship science to real life experiences.

HDFS/​AFROAMER/​SOC WORK  521 — AFRICAN AMERICAN FAMILIES

3 credits.

Historical background; variations in contemporary family patterns; courtship and marriage, reproduction, and socialization stresses; "culture of poverty" theories; sources of stability and change.

HDFS/​AMER IND  522 — AMERICAN INDIAN FAMILIES

3 credits.

Interdisciplinary examination of American Indian families in historical and contemporary contexts. Emphasizes the changing experience and structure of Native families in response to changing political, economic, social, and cultural pressures and policies over the past 200 years and contemporary challenges.

HDFS 535 — A FAMILY PERSPECTIVE IN POLICYMAKING

3 credits.

Students will explore the relationship between family functioning and public/private policies at the local, state and federal levels; analyze the consequences of issues, policies or programs on family well-being; and, examine roles for professionals in influencing policy development.

HDFS 592 — RESEARCH EXPERIENCE IN HUMAN DEVELOPMENT AND FAMILY STUDIES

1-3 credits.

Research experience under the supervision of a faculty member in Human Development and Family Studies.

HDFS 601 — INTERNSHIP

1-8 credits.

Enables students with supervised internships to earn academic credit while engaged in a professional experience in human development and family studies related fields. Course intended for juniors and seniors in Human Development and Family Studies.

HDFS/​COM ARTS/​JOURN  616 — MASS MEDIA AND YOUTH

3 credits.

Children's and adolescents' use of mass media and mass media effects on them. Particular attention is given to changes in comprehension and other cognitive activities that give insights into media use and effects.

HDFS/​INTER-HE  650 — PARENT EDUCATION AND SUPPORT PROGRAMS

3 credits.

The purposes, contexts, and implementation of parenting support and education programs are studied. Some sections may include a service learning component.

HDFS 662 — ADVANCED STUDY OF THE YOUNG CHILD

3 credits.

Research literature and current theories; topics of individual interest.

HDFS 663 — DEVELOPMENTAL AND FAMILY ASSESSMENT

3 credits.

Introduces students to the process of family-focused developmental assessment with infants and young children, including family interviewing, taking developmental histories, observing children, and developmental screening.

HDFS 664 — PROSEMINAR: HUMAN DEVELOPMENT AND FAMILY STUDIES

1-3 credits.

Survey and introduction to children and families. Required of all first year graduate students in Human Development and Family Studies. Credit varies by semester.

HDFS 680 — SENIOR HONORS THESIS

2-4 credits.

Individual study for seniors completing theses for Human Ecology honors degrees as arranged with a faculty member.

HDFS 690 — SENIOR THESIS

2 credits.

Individual study for seniors completing theses as arranged with a faculty member.

HDFS 699 — INDEPENDENT STUDY

1-6 credits.

Directed study projects for juniors and seniors as arranged with a faculty member.

HDFS/​ED PSYCH  725 — THEORY AND ISSUES IN HUMAN DEVELOPMENT

3 credits.

This course covers both classic and contemporary theories, providing students with a firm grounding in the theoretical perspectives that have shaped and are shaping understandings of human development across the life-span. The course explores the historical roots of contemporary perspectives and examines the development of theoretical conceptualizations both within and across theoretical perspectives.

HDFS/​COUN PSY/​ED PSYCH  726 — ETHNIC AND RACIAL DIVERSITY IN SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT

3 credits.

Review of empirical and theoretical research on ethnic/racial diversity in social development across childhood, adolescence and early adulthood with emphasis on implications for counseling and school psychology.

HDFS 727 — CULTURE AND HUMAN DEVELOPMENT

3 credits.

This seminar examines a wide set of issues related to understanding the role of culture in processes of human growth and maturation, and a related set of issues dealing with how we research culture and human development.

HDFS 760 — INFANCY AND THE FAMILY

3 credits.

Understanding of infants' socio-emotional, language, cognitive, perceptual and motor development within the context of the family and other social settings. Issues related to early developmental psychopathology and intervention will also be covered.

HDFS 761 — CHILDHOOD AND THE FAMILY

3 credits.

Explores family socialization topics relevant to development issues in the early and middle childhood. Relevant contextual issues i.e. class, caste, culture and gender will be interfaced with traditional topics such as, sex stereotyping, racial identity, play, social competence, attachment, moral development and aggression.

HDFS 763 — AGING AND THE FAMILY

3 credits.

Psychological and social aspects of aging. Interaction of aged individual with the family and larger social systems. Developmental principles, methodological considerations, theoretical/empirical issues, and findings.

HDFS 765 — FAMILIES & POVERTY

3 credits.

Introduce students to research on families and poverty. Students learn how family behaviors vary by socioeconomic status; how romantic relationships, childbearing, and childrearing may be implicated in poverty; what the consequences of poverty are for family functioning and children; and about the role of policy in influencing families and poverty.

HDFS 766 — CURRENT TOPICS IN HUMAN DEVELOPMENT AND FAMILY STUDIES

1-3 credits.

Specialized subject matter of current interest to graduate students. Literature, research, and current trends, with implications for teaching, parent education, and other professions. Prerequisites vary by topic

HDFS/​COM ARTS  817 — COUPLE RELATIONSHIPS: THEORY, RESEARCH, AND APPLICATION

3 credits.

This course will review current research on the nature, dynamics, and developmental course of couple relationships and explore the implications of this scientific knowledge for prevention/intervention programs and policy. Contemporary theories and empirical research will be examined.

HDFS 818 — ATTACHMENT THEORY AND RELATIONSHIPS ACROSS THE LIFESPAN

3 credits.

Examines parent-child and intimate relationships using attachment theory and research (and critiques of this approach), focusing on relationships formed in infancy and across the lifespan.

HDFS/​CURRIC  841 — THE EDUCATIONAL ROLE OF THE FAMILY IN EARLY CHILDHOOD DEVELOPMENT

3 credits.

Socialization practices associated with development and education in early childhood; focus on parental teaching practices which influence techniques, communication styles, and cognitive styles within the context of social class and family structure; emphasis on theory, research, and educational applications.

HDFS 842 — PARENT-CHILD RELATIONS ACROSS THE LIFE COURSE

3 credits.

Parent-child relations as a dynamic reciprocal process from an interdisciplinary and multicultural perspective. Historical and contemporary views on parenthood across the life course will be covered in the context of traditional and nontraditional family forms.

HDFS 843 — FAMILY POLICY: HOW IT AFFECTS FAMILIES & WHAT PROFESSIONALS CAN DO

3 credits.

Covers how policies affect families and whether policies would be more effective if approached from a family perspective. Students will learn theories for conceptualizing family policy, how to conduct family impact analysis, and strategies for connecting research and policymaking.

HDFS 865 — FAMILY THEORY I (SURVEY)

3 credits.

An advanced course which surveys the current theories and models used in family research and theory development. Focus will be on structure-functional, interactional, developmental, systems, and exchange theory in relation to family research and application.

HDFS 869 — ADVANCED SEMINAR IN FAMILY STRESS AND COPING

3 credits.

Emphasis on theoretical explanations of family stress from various levels of analysis--individual, social network, family, community, and larger social context. Considers sources of stress and how families experience, respond to, cope with, and resolve stress.

HDFS 872 — BRIDGING THE GAP BETWEEN RESEARCH AND ACTION

3 credits.

Addresses the critical skills and methods needed to gather and apply research-based knowledge and theory to human development and family studies. Strategies for conducting research relevant to social policy, programs, and the general public will be discussed as well as techniques for communicating research.

HDFS/​ED PSYCH/​NURSING/​SOC WORK  880 — PREVENTION SCIENCE

3 credits.

This course provides a theoretical, empirical and practical foundation for prevention science as it relates to the prevention of human social problems. Research and evaluation methods, program design strategies, best practices and policy as they relate to the field of prevention are also examined. Intended for 2nd year graduate students.

HDFS/​ED PSYCH/​NURSING/​SOC WORK  881 — CAPSTONE SEMINAR IN PREVENTION SCIENCE

1 credit.

This course provides an opportunity for students to meet with prevention professionals and scholars from across campus and the community to explore current and emerging issues of prevention research and professional practice. Students must complete HDFS/​ED PSYCH/​NURSING/​SOC WORK  880 before taking this course.

HDFS 990 — RESEARCH AND THESIS

1-12 credits.

Independent research and writing for graduate students under the supervision of a faculty member.

HDFS 999 — INDEPENDENT STUDY

1-3 credits.

Directed study projects for graduate students as arranged with a faculty member.