E M A 1 — COOPERATIVE EDUCATION PROGRAM

1 credit.

Work experience which combines classroom theory with practical knowledge of operations to provide students with a background upon which to base a professional career in industry.

E M A 110 — INTRODUCTION TO PRIVATE PILOT

4 credits.

The first course of a two-course series to earn a private pilot's license. This first course will teach students all of the ground- school subjects necessary to become a private pilot. Lecture topics include aircraft structure, mechanical systems, flight instruments and avionics, aerodynamics, aircraft performance, aviation meteorology, airport operations, navigation, aeromedical factors, rules and regulations. In-class discussion will center around PC-based simulation scenarios that feature classroom demonstrations of the theory taught online. Students will be charged flight fees for this course. Flight fees may vary, dependent on skill of student and instructor fees. See the class notes for information about fees.

E M A 201 — STATICS

3 credits.

Principles of mechanics, force systems, equilibrium, structures, distributed forces, moments of inertia of areas, and friction. Open to Freshmen

E M A 202 — DYNAMICS

3 credits.

Kinematics, force-mass-acceleration relations, work and energy, impulse and momentum, moments of inertia and mass.

E M A 291 — PROJECTS IN ENGINEERING MECHANICS & ASTRONAUTICS

1-3 credits.

Individual engineering projects under staff supervision.

E M A 303 — MECHANICS OF MATERIALS

3 credits.

Stress and strain, torsion, bending of beams, shearing stresses in beams, compound stresses, principal stresses, deflections of beams, statically indeterminate members, columns. For civil engineers.

E M A/​M E  307 — MECHANICS OF MATERIALS LAB

1 credit.

Data processing, tension/compression tests, creep stress concentrations, fatigue, fracture, composite materials, combined stress, beam flexure, dynamic loads, buckling.

E M A/​CIV ENGR  395 — MATERIALS FOR CONSTRUCTED FACILITIES

3 credits.

Properties and tests of materials used in the initial construction or repair of facilities (including buildings, transportation systems, utility systems, and reinforced earth). Introduction to laboratory and field measurement techniques to assess material performance capabilities. Technical report preparation.

E M A 405 — PRACTICUM IN FINITE ELEMENTS

3 credits.

Use of finite elements (FE) for solving practical problems in mechanics. Elementary theory of FE is discussed. A commercial computer program is used for applications. Major emphasis is on behavior of FE, modeling, and evaluation of results for correctness.

E M A/​CBE/​CHEM/​M E  425 — UNDERGRADUATE RHEOLOGY SEMINAR

1 credit.

Rheology seminar course encouraged for all interested in professions related to polymers, suspensions or rheology; will not count toward credit requirement of the major.

E M A 469 — DESIGN PROBLEMS IN ENGINEERING

3 credits.

The design philosophy is presented. Students will be required to apply their knowledge of elementary mechanics, engineering and basic science to arrive at acceptable solutions to a variety of design problems.

E M A/​E P  471 — INTERMEDIATE PROBLEM SOLVING FOR ENGINEERS

3 credits.

Use of computational tools for the solution of problems encountered in engineering physics applications. Topics covered include orbital mechanics, structural vibrations, beam and plate deformations, heat transfer, neutron diffusion, and criticality. Emphasis will be on modeling, choice of appropriate algorithms, and model validation.

E M A/​E P  476 — INTRODUCTION TO SCIENTIFIC COMPUTING FOR ENGINEERING PHYSICS

3 credits.

Basic tools of professional scientific computation for UNIX environments are taught. Programming skills in a compiled language are developed through engineering examples. Applications reinforce engineering problem-solving skills first examined in introductory courses, while motivating progressively more advanced computational methods.

E M A 489 — HONORS IN RESEARCH

1-3 credits.

Undergraduate research and senior honors thesis in engineering mechanics and astronautics.

E M A 506 — ADVANCED MECHANICS OF MATERIALS I

3 credits.

Analysis and design of load-carrying members, shear center, unsymmetrical bending, curved beams, beams on elastic foundations, energy methods, theories of failure, thick-walled cylinders, stress concentrations, design to prevent failure by excessive elastic deformation, plastic deformation and fracture.

E M A/​CIV ENGR./​M E  508 — COMPOSITE MATERIALS

3 credits.

Physical properties and mechanical behavior of polymer, metal, ceramic, cementitious, cellulosic and biological composite systems; micro- and macro-mechanics; lamination and strength analyses; static and transient loading; fabrication; recycling; design; analytical-experimental correlation; applications.

E M A 519 — FRACTURE MECHANICS

3 credits.

Introduction to the mechanics of fracture of linear and nonlinear materials. Crack stress and deformation fields; stress intensity factors; crack tip plastic zone; fracture toughness testing; energy release rate; J-integral. Criteria for crack growth initiation/stability; application to design.

E M A 521 — AERODYNAMICS

3 credits.

Potential flow theory; stream functions; vortex filaments and sheets. Two- and three-dimensional wing theory. Doublet and panels methods. Propeller theory.

E M A 522 — AERODYNAMICS LAB

3 credits.

Teams of two or three students perform case study of a wing using computer simulations and lab experiments. Experimental and computational results are compared against theoretical predictions developed in prerequisite class. Results are presented in three oral and three written reports.

E M A 523 — FLIGHT DYNAMICS AND CONTROL

3 credits.

Aircraft longitudinal and lateral static stability. Aircraft equations of motion. Stability derivatives. Longitudinal and lateral dynamic stability of uncontrolled motion. Open-loop aircraft control. Closed-loop aircraft control.

E M A/​M E  540 — EXPERIMENTAL VIBRATION AND DYNAMIC SYSTEM ANALYSIS

3 credits.

Application of digital data aquisition to the investigation of mechanical components, structures and systems using time histories, transforms and response functions to characterize free, forced and transient inputs. Introduction to sensors, instrumentation and methods appropriate for dynamic system response.

E M A/​M S & E  541 — HETEROGENEOUS AND MULTIPHASE MATERIALS

3 credits.

Principles of the mechanics of solid multiphase systems. Role of heterogeneity and anisotropy in determining physical properties including elastic, dielectric and piezoelectric properties. Applications in lightweight structures, ultrastrong materials, materials for protection of the body, and materials for the replacement of human tissues. Materials with fibrous, lamellar, particular, and cellular structures. Heterogeneous materials of biological origin. Biomimetic and bio-inpired materials.

E M A 542 — ADVANCED DYNAMICS

3 credits.

Kinematics and kinetics of plane and three-dimensional motion, Coriolis acceleration, general methods of linear and angular momentum, central force motion, gyrodynamics, generalized coordinates. Lagrange's equations.

E M A 545 — MECHANICAL VIBRATIONS

3 credits.

General theory of free, forced, and transient vibrations; vibration transmission, isolation, and measurement; normal modes and generalized coordinates; method of matrix equation formulation and solution. The application of theory and methods to the analysis, measurement and design of dynamic systems.

E M A/​E P  547 — ENGINEERING ANALYSIS I

3 credits.

Methods of higher mathematics; stress on problem solving rather than rigorous proofs; linear algebra, calculus of variations, Green's function.

E M A/​E P  548 — ENGINEERING ANALYSIS II

3 credits.

Function of complex variable, series solution of different equations, partial differential equations.

E M A/​ASTRON  550 — ASTRODYNAMICS

3 credits.

Coordinate system transformations, central force motion, two body problem, three and n-body problem, theory of orbital perturbations, artificial satellites, elementary transfer orbits, and elementary rocket dynamics.

E M A 569 — SENIOR DESIGN PROJECT

3 credits.

Students will select specific engineering design projects. These projects will be student team efforts supervised by individual faculty members.

E M A/​M E  570 — EXPERIMENTAL MECHANICS

3 credits.

Experimental methods for design and analysis of mechanical components, structures and materials. Electrically and optically recorded stress, strain and deformation data; computer aquisition/reduction/presentat techniques; applications to static and transient events, sensors, transducer design, NDT, fracture and residual stresses.

E M A 599 — INDEPENDENT STUDY

1-3 credits.

E M A 601 — SPECIAL TOPICS IN ENGINEERING MECHANICS

1-3 credits.

Selected topics in such areas as structural mechanics, dynamics, experimental mechanics, vibrations, engineering materials, soil mechanics, engineering analysis, rheology, etc.

E M A 605 — INTRODUCTION TO FINITE ELEMENTS

3 credits.

A first course in finite elements, with theory and applications in stress analysis and in areas related to structural mechanics. Practice in the use and/or development of computer programs.

E M A 610 — STRUCTURAL FINITE ELEMENT MODEL VALIDATION

3 credits.

An introduction to test-based validation of finite element models for the design and analysis of dynamic structures.

E M A 611 — ADVANCED MECHANICAL TESTING OF MATERIALS

3 credits.

Theory and use of servo-controlled, electro-hydraulic equipment for research of mechanical properties of engineering materials. Measurement of stress, strain, hysteresis energy, and material properties during deformation and at fracture. Analysis of four significant components of total strain.

E M A/​E P  615 — MICRO- AND NANOSCALE MECHANICS

3 credits.

An introduction to micro- and nanoscale science and engineering with a focus on the role of mechanics. A variety of micro- and nanoscale phenomena and applications covered, drawing connections to both established and new mechanics approaches.

E M A 622 — MECHANICS OF CONTINUA

3 credits.

Tensor analysis; analysis of stress, strain and rate of strain; application of Newtonian mechanics to deformable media; mechanical constitutive equations; field equations of fluid mechanics and elasticity.

E M A 630 — VISCOELASTIC SOLIDS

3 credits.

Linear theory of viscoelasticity; non-aging materials; Boltzmann superposition principle; time-temperature superposition boundary value problems. Applications: vibration damping, relaxation of stress, creep, droop, and sag in structural members, sound absorption, creep buckling, settlement of foundations, tire mechanics, and shock attenuation.

E M A 642 — SATELLITE DYNAMICS

3 credits.

Review of Euler's equations, torque-free motion, stability of rotation, energy dissipation effects, gyroscopic instruments, gyrodynamics of the Earth, gravity gradient stabilized satellites, spin stabilized satellites, dual spin satellites, tethered satellites, mass movement techniques, space vehicle motion and rocket dynamics.

E M A 690 — MASTER'S RESEARCH

1-9 credits.

E M A 700 — THEORY OF ELASTICITY

3 credits.

Equations of elasticity in curvilinear and rectangular coordinates; two dimensional problems; problems of prismatic bars; variational methods and energy principles; complex variable and numerical methods; thermal stress problems.

E M A 702 — GRADUATE COOPERATIVE EDUCATION PROGRAM

1-2 credits.

Work experience that combines classroom theory with practical knowledge of operations to provide students with a background on which to develop and enhance a professional career. The work experience is tailored for MS students from within the U.S. as well as eligible international students.

E M A 703 — LINEAR VISCOELASTICITY AND PLASTICITY

3 credits.

Linear theory of solid and fluid viscoelasticity. Solution of problems by transform techniques. Wave propagation. Thermoviscoelasticity. Yield criteria. Plastic stress-strain relations. Solution of problems for the perfectly plastic material and the elastoplastic material.

E M A 705 — ADVANCED TOPICS IN FINITE ELEMENTS

3 credits.

Finite element methods for problems with linear and nonlinear media. Stress analysis, heat transfer, and fluid dynamics. Vibration and transient analysis. Weighted residual methods. Material and geometric nonlinearity. Nonlinear iteration methods. Instructor may also select additional material.

E M A/​M E  706 — PLATES, SHELLS AND PRESSURE VESSELS

3 credits.

Stress and deflection analysis of structural plates and membranes under mechanical and thermal loads; variational and numerical methods; instability and vibrations; membrane shell theory; cylindrical shells; pressure vessel and piping design applications; ASME Pressure Vessel Code.

E M A/​M E  708 — ADVANCED COMPOSITE MATERIALS

3 credits.

Contemporary topics such as new materials; smart materials/structures/systems; fatigue; fracture; experimental techniques; nondestructive evaluation; transient, micro, three-dimensional, nonlinear, inelastic and environmental effects; manufacturing methods: repair and applications.

E M A 719 — ADVANCED FRACTURE MECHANICS

3 credits.

Rigorous, systematic development of principal concepts and theories of modern fracture mechanics. Topics include stress and deformation fields for stationary and growing cracks in linear elastic, nonlinear elastic, elastic-plastic and viscoelastic materials; J-integral theory and applications; criteria for crack growth, stability and fracture.

E M A/​M E  722 — INTRODUCTION TO POLYMER RHEOLOGY

3 credits.

Formulation of constitutive equations using embedded base vectors. Viscosity, normal stress differences, stress relaxation, elastic recoil. Polymer rheology; homogeneous strain history.

E M A 742 — THEORY AND APPLICATIONS IN ADVANCED DYNAMICS

3 credits.

Dynamical systems theory, advanced rigid body attitude dynamics, Lagrange's equations of motion, conservation laws, quasi-coordinates, Routh's method for ignorable coordinates, Hamilton's equations of motion, dynamic stability, Liapunov stability methods, angular momentum methods for systems of rigid bodies, modeling of rotating elastic systems, Kane's equations of motion, deterministic chaos.

E M A 745 — ADVANCED METHODS IN STRUCTURAL DYNAMICS

3 credits.

Emphasis is placed on techniques used to analyze aerospace structures. Variational principles, Hamilton's extended principle, Lagrange's equations, mathematical models for continuous systems, natural modes of vibrations, dynamic response using mode superposition, mode acceleration, residual flexibility, vibration analysis using finite element methods, advanced substructure representations, component mode synthesis, systems with rigid body modes for aeronautical and astronautical systems.

E M A 747 — NONLINEAR AND RANDOM MECHANICAL VIBRATIONS

3 credits.

Exact solutions and sectorial linearization; free and forced vibration of mechanical systems with nonlinear restoring force; self-excited mechanical vibrations and relaxation vibrations; subharmonic responses; nonlinear vibration of mechanical systems with more than one degree of freedom; nonlinear vibration of bounded continuous media; random excitation and random response, random vibrations of mechanical systems and structures; random vibrations of nonlinear mechanical systems; failure of materials under random vibrations.

E M A/​COMP SCI/​E C E/​E P/​M E  759 — HIGH PERFORMANCE COMPUTING FOR APPLICATIONS IN ENGINEERING

3 credits.

An overview of hardware and software solutions that enable the use of advanced computing in tackling computationally intensive Engineering problems. Hands-on learning promoted through programming assignments that leverage emerging hardware architectures and use parallel computing programming languages. Students are strongly encourage to have completed COMP SCI 367 or COMP SCI 400 or to have equivalent experience.

E M A 790 — MASTER'S RESEARCH AND THESIS

1-9 credits.

For Master's candidates only

E M A/​M E  825 — MOLECULAR NETWORK THEORIES FOR POLYMERIC MATERIALS

3 credits.

Stress-strain-birefringence relations for rubber-like solid derived from "Gaussian' network model. Birefringence theory from Maxwell's equations. Temporary-junction networks: constitutive equations for concentrated polymer solutions and molten polymers.

E M A 890 — PRE-DISSERTATOR RESEARCH

1-9 credits.

For pre-dissertator stdts only

E M A/​CBE/​CHEM/​M E  925 — RHEOLOGY RESEARCH SEMINAR

1 credit.

Exploration of the most recent research literature on viscoelasticity, constitutive equations, non-Newtonian flow systems, fluid metering devices, kinetic theory of macromolecules, and rheooptical phenomena. Periodic reports on recent advances made by research workers in the various rheology groups on the Madison campus.

E M A 990 — RESEARCH AND THESIS

1-12 credits.