JOURN 162 — MASS MEDIA IN MULTICULTURAL AMERICA

3 credits.

An introduction to the roles and functions of print, film, electronic and digital media in multicultural America. International comparisons highlight differences and commonalities in the social and cultural position of mass media in societies with racially and ethnically diverse populations.

JOURN 175 — MEDIA FLUENCY FOR THE DIGITAL AGE

3 credits.

The media landscape has changed vastly over the last 20 years, and it has major ramifications for how we see the practice and professions of journalism and strategic communication. Through discussions in class and a group media fluency blog, students will examine and engage with this contemporary media landscape.

JOURN 176 — SPECIAL TOPICS IN MASS COMMUNICATION

3 credits.

Special focus on a specific conceptual issue or topic involving mass communication.

JOURN 201 — INTRODUCTION TO MASS COMMUNICATION

4 credits.

How the mass media are organized and how they function in modern society; their technological basis, economic and political foundations, and social implications.

JOURN 202 — MASS COMMUNICATION PRACTICES

6 credits.

Communication as a process involving sender and receiver, message and medium. Course provides students with a foundation of basic communication skills, helps students develop an appreciation of how different media influence the nature of information presented, and introduces students to technical skills.

JOURN 335 — PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICES OF REPORTING

4 credits.

Basic reporting for print and electronic media. Students will bring together technical and conceptual skills by creating a variety of print, audio, and web-based news stories on a current public issue.

JOURN 345 — PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE OF STRATEGIC COMMUNICATION

4 credits.

Introduction to strategic communication for students interested in advertising, public relations, health communications, and political campaigns.

JOURN/​POLI SCI/​URB R PL  373 — INTRODUCTION TO SURVEY RESEARCH

3 credits.

Theory and practice of survey research; planning, sampling, questionnaire construction, interviewing, content analysis, machine tabulation, analysis of data; two hours lecture; two hours lab or field work. Not open to students with credit for POLI SCI 544 prior to fall 2017

JOURN 401 — IN-DEPTH REPORTING

4 credits.

Advanced reporting with emphasis on critical evaluation of evidence and on recognizing the complex effects of government actions. Students will explore and develop community context stories that originate in a range of venues from the courts to the schools.

JOURN 404 — INTERPRETATION OF CONTEMPORARY AFFAIRS

4 credits.

Preparing and writing of editorials, columns and news analyses.

JOURN 405 — CREATIVE NONFICTION

4 credits.

Creative elements of non-fiction story telling to develop skills necessary for writing across the journalistic spectrum, from newspapers to magazines to books.

JOURN 411 — MULTIMEDIA DESIGN

4 credits.

This course focuses on visual communication and graphic design in multimedia contexts. Students build design and production techniques to relay creative messages through print and digital media. Content explores design theory and techniques, as well as the effects and ethics of visual media messages.

JOURN 415 — SCIENCE AND ENVIRONMENTAL JOURNALISM

4 credits.

Instruction and practice in strategies for communicating science to the public. Emphases include (1) how to explain difficult concepts and prrocesses; (2) skills for telling interesting and artful stories; and (3) strategies for making reasonable judgments about scientific evidence.

JOURN 417 — MAGAZINE PUBLISHING

4 credits.

This course takes an integrated, in-depth approach to magazine management, writing, editing and design. It covers the magazine industry from both the editorial and business ends, bringing together journalism and strategic communication students. The course produces Curb magazine in print, online and mobile formats.

JOURN 420 — INVESTIGATIVE REPORTING

4 credits.

This class will teach the techniques of investigative and long-form enterprise reporting. Students will engage in extensive reporting in the field, and produce a final project.

JOURN 425 — VIDEO JOURNALISM

4 credits.

Video journalism is widespread, thanks to online news and sources such as YouTube. In this course, students will create news stories using the techniques of videography, digital editing, writing and producing. Video journalism is unique in its language, requiring engaging material, a fast start, sharp focus, short narrative and natural voices. Students will focus on capturing stories with strong visuals and ambient sound of the people affected by issues and events.

JOURN 426 — COMMUNITY-BASED REPORTING

4 credits.

Provides advanced, targeted instruction in reporting that pays close attention to neighborhoods or very small communities (subcommunities), also known as hyperlocal reporting. These small communities can be defined by geographic boundaries or boundaries of shared topical interest. The course will locate community-based reporting's place in the larger media ecology of mainstream media (newspapers, TV, weekly papers, magazines, independent websites, etc.), and investigate how local journalism's place in changing media ecologies helps (or discourages) people from becoming active citizens in a democracy.

JOURN 445 — CREATIVE CAMPAIGN MESSAGES

4 credits.

Introduction to the creative aspects of message development for advertising, public relations, and other strategic communications.

JOURN 447 — STRATEGIC MEDIA PLANNING

4 credits.

Introduction to media planning for students interested in careers in advertising, public relations, or other forms of strategic communication.

JOURN 449 — ACCOUNT PLANNING AND STRATEGY

4 credits.

Process of planning, implementing, and analyzing strategic communication campaigns.

JOURN 453 — STRATEGIC MEDIA RELATIONS

4 credits.

This course will give students the advanced practical skills and conceptual understanding necessary to function impressively as an entry-level professional in media relations, i.e., transmitting news to mass communicators in traditional and interactive media on behalf of a client or organization.

JOURN 463 — DIGITAL MEDIA STRATEGIES

4 credits.

Provides an overview of digital media from an objective, strategy, and tactical planning perspective within strategic communication media and promotion campaigns. This course is geared toward students with an interest in careers in advertising, public relations, or other forms of strategic communication. Because of the rapid growth of digital communications, students will benefit from knowing more about digital media whether working in account, media or creative at an agency or corporation.

JOURN 464 — PUBLIC RELATIONS STRATEGIES

4 credits.

Provides an overview of public relations from an objective, strategy, and tactical planning perspective within strategic communication campaigns. A depth course; it takes one core element of a strategic communications campaign, and provides an in-depth study into the topic area of public relations. This course is geared toward students with an interest in careers in advertising, public relations, or other forms of strategic communication.

JOURN 470 — STRATEGIC COMMUNICATION CAMPAIGNS CAPSTONE

4 credits.

Provides a grounding in advanced principles of strategic communication campaign development and execution, further developing skills used in creating advertising and marketing communications, focusing on research, strategy, copy and design, media, and public relations/promotions. This course is designed as a capstone experience ('concluding achievement') within the strategic communications track of the Journalism major.

JOURN 475 — SPECIAL TOPICS IN ADVANCED CONCEPTS AND SKILLS

1-4 credits.

Exploration of a particular set of concepts and skills in more depth. Subject will vary.

JOURN/​COM ARTS  558 — PUBLIC, COMMUNITY, AND ALTERNATIVE MEDIA

3 credits.

Examination of media outside the dominant commercial model, especially local and alternative practices, and their cultural role.

JOURN/​HISTORY  560 — HISTORY OF MASS COMMUNICATION

4 credits.

Evolution of the mass media in the United States in the context of political, social, and economic change.

JOURN 561 — MASS COMMUNICATION AND SOCIETY

4 credits.

Relationships between mass communications and society; analysis and evaluation of media performance and of suggestions for change.

JOURN 563 — LAW OF MASS COMMUNICATION

4 credits.

Freedom of speech and press with particular emphasis on major legal issues confronting media practitioners; introduction to such areas of law as censorship, libel, invasion of privacy, access to information, regulation of electronic media and commercial speech.

JOURN 564 — MEDIA AND THE CONSUMER

4 credits.

Advertising and other mass media content from the consumer's viewpoint; consumer's need and opportunities for information, and use of opportunities; consumer evaluation of media performance, guidelines for effective use; alternative means for obtaining information; implications of consumer movement.

JOURN 565 — EFFECTS OF MASS COMMUNICATION

4 credits.

Use and effects of mass communication for individuals and societies. Course examines who is affected, what effects occur and how much, what different media content is involved and what situations make effects more or less likely.

JOURN 566 — COMMUNICATION AND PUBLIC OPINION

4 credits.

The role of the mass media of communication in the formation of public opinion. Propaganda goals of government, political, economic, and social groups.

JOURN 601 — COLLOQUIUM IN PROFESSIONAL COMMUNICATION CAREERS

1 credit.

Weekly colloquium on current issues and career options in journalism mass communication, featuring professional speakers from academia, industry, government, and the non-profit sector.

JOURN/​COM ARTS/​HDFS  616 — MASS MEDIA AND YOUTH

3 credits.

Children's and adolescents' use of mass media and mass media effects on them. Particular attention is given to changes in comprehension and other cognitive activities that give insights into media use and effects.

JOURN/​COM ARTS/​LSC  617 — HEALTH COMMUNICATION IN THE INFORMATION AGE

3 credits.

This course will examine the role of communication in health, how the revolution in information technology has affected health communication, and the assumptions about health information and communication that drive current efforts to use technologies.

JOURN 618 — MASS COMMUNICATION AND POLITICAL BEHAVIOR

4 credits.

Interrelationships of news media, political campaigning, and the electorate. Impact of media coverage and persuasive appeals on image and issue voting, political participation and socialization.

JOURN 620 — INTERNATIONAL COMMUNICATION

4 credits.

Historical, political, economic and cultural trends in global mass communication systems.

JOURN 621 — MASS COMMUNICATION IN DEVELOPING NATIONS

4 credits.

Development, structure, and role of mass communication systems in Africa, Asia, and Latin America.

JOURN/​ART HIST/​HISTORY/​L I S  650 — HISTORY OF BOOKS AND PRINT CULTURE IN EUROPE AND NORTH AMERICA

3 credits.

History of books and print culture in the West from ancient times to the present. Focus on the influence of reading and writing on social, cultural, and intellectual life. Methodologies, theories, and sources for study of book and print culture history.

JOURN 658 — COMMUNICATION RESEARCH METHODS

4 credits.

Survey of methods for investigating mass communication process and effects.

JOURN/​ASIAN AM  662 — MASS MEDIA AND MINORITIES

4 credits.

Representations of minority groups in U.S. news and entertainment mass media. Historical, social, political, economic, and other factors influencing the mass mediated depictions of minorities.

JOURN 664 — SOCIAL NETWORKS IN COMMUNICATION

3 credits.

Examines key concepts in social network theory and develops and applies them to the field of communication. Attention is paid to the differences between social and online networks, as well as their relationships. This class will explore major concepts and questions in social network theory and analysis, including the elements that make up a network; network relationships (e.g. homophily, knowing others like ourselves); the construction of whole social networks out of dyads (two people) and triads (three); strong and weak ties; roles and positions; groups, cliques, and clusters; as well as small worlds and communities. Emphasis will be on what these concepts mean and how they work. There will be minimal introduction to technical network analysis and hands- on work.

JOURN 666 — PROFESSIONAL RESPONSIBILITY IN MASS COMMUNICATION

3 credits.

Explores concept of "professionalism" in journalism and strategic communication, with emphasis on societal expectations for media and ethical systems. Applies theory to specific cases.

JOURN 669 — LITERARY ASPECTS OF JOURNALISM

3 credits.

Critical reading of the best reporting and writing.

JOURN 670 — COMMUNITY SERVICE LEARNING: TECHNOLOGY FOR SOCIAL CHANGE

3 credits.

The course is an upper-level undergraduate/graduate service learning course that integrates the study of the social impact of new communication technologies into community engagement practices. The course will illuminate social, political, psychological, and policy implications of the adoption and use of new and emerging technologies and provide an educational opportunity to apply the knowledge and skills obtained from the class to a local, community-based collaborative project (i.e. integrated social media campaign) that aims to strengthen the community. This collaborative project is a hands-on experiment that demonstrates how to use new communication technologies for social change.

JOURN 675 — TOPICS IN GOVERNMENT AND MASS MEDIA

3 credits.

Analysis of political and legal relationships between mass communication and government with emphasis on current problems and issues.

JOURN 676 — SPECIAL TOPICS IN MASS COMMUNICATION

1-4 credits.

Analysis of a conceptual mass communication issue in more depth than is available in existing courses. Subject will vary.

JOURN/​L I S  677 — CONCEPTS AND TOOLS FOR DATA ANALYSIS AND VISUALIZATION

3 credits.

Ours has become a data society. Like at no other time, our world--the natural world, from storm systems to diseases; governments and companies; and our conversations with friends and relatives, even our movements--is recorded in digital format. A few years ago, Google CEO Eric Schmidt famously stated that "There was 5 exabytes of information created between the dawn of civilization through 2003, but that much information is now created every 2 days, and the pace is increasing." (An exabyte is 1 trillion megabytes.) The result is that professional communicators in journalism and mass communication, as well as researchers and private firms, now literally have more data than they know what to do with. There is tremendous need across our society for people who are able to use data to investigate important questions, draw useful insights from those data, and communicate those insights to others--and also to be realistic and honest about what data can and cannot do. That is what this class is for: it is an introduction to the world of data, how data can be used to answer questions and those answers can be effectively and ethically communicated. More specifically, we will offer a combination of conceptual training, instruction in specific tools for data analysis and visualization, and the opportunity to put new skills to use in a final project. This course is intended for Juniors, Seniors and Graduate students and by instructor permission. Research methods experience preferred.

JOURN 678 — LEGAL & ETHICAL DIMENSIONS OF EMERGING MEDIA

3 credits.

Examines the legal ethical questions surrounding digital media and their effects on society and individuals.

JOURN 681 — SENIOR HONORS THESIS

3 credits.

JOURN 682 — SENIOR HONORS THESIS

3 credits.

JOURN 691 — SENIOR THESIS

3 credits.

JOURN 692 — SENIOR THESIS

3 credits.

JOURN 697 — INTERNSHIP

1-3 credits.

Students may earn no more than three internship credits as a part of their degree program.

JOURN 698 — DIRECTED STUDY

1-6 credits.

Graded on Cr/N basis; requires cons inst

JOURN 699 — DIRECTED STUDY

1-6 credits.

Graded on a lettered basis; requires cons inst

JOURN 800 — ADVANCED MASS MEDIA PRACTICE

3 credits.

Advanced projects in professional practice in mass media. When course focuses on journalism, it typically emphasizes advanced projects in specialized reporting. Course is designed for professional-track M.A. students. Emphasis varies with instructor. Course may be repeated with different instructor.

JOURN 801 — MASS COMMUNICATION AND THE INDIVIDUAL

3 credits.

Theory and research on individuals' use of mass communication and effects of mass communication. Topics include choice, selection and functions of mass media use, attention and cognitive processing, information effects, persuasion and emotion/involvement, and social and behaviroal effects.

JOURN 802 — MASS COMMUNICATION AND SOCIETY

3 credits.

This course examines systematic procedures for theory building and comparison of theories of communication processes between mass media and other societal institutions and their relationships with both individuals and micro-social systems.

JOURN 803 — MASS COMMUNICATION AND CULTURE

3 credits.

Intensive readings focusing on the critical studies and/or cultural studies traditions in mass communication theory and research.

JOURN/​HISTORY  808 — MASS COMMUNICATION HISTORY

3 credits.

Intensive reading and discussion designed to introduce students to literature of mass communication.

JOURN/​LSC  811 — CONCEPTUALIZATION AND DESIGN OF MASS COMMUNICATION RESEARCH

2-3 credits.

Assists students in turning research questions into substantive research designs with understanding of the concepts involved. For most students, the final product will be a well-developed thesis or dissertation proposal.

JOURN 812 — QUALITATIVE COMMUNICATION RESEARCH METHODS

3 credits.

Course in research methodology designed to assist students to design research, analyze and interpret evidence, and develop a deeper appreciation of research strategies.

JOURN 820 — MASS COMMUNICATION LAW AND POLICY

3 credits.

Intensive reading and discussion focussing on theories of press freedom and current issues in mass communication law and policy. A bibliographic essay will be required.

JOURN 821 — HEALTH COMMUNICATION

3 credits.

This course considers the application and integration of theory in understanding the effects of mass media, with close attention to health communication campaign messages.

JOURN 822 — GLOBAL COMMUNICATION

3 credits.

Readings and discussion focussing on global media issues. Topics may include news flow, cultural imperialism, representations, history and political economy, globalization trends, new technologies, mass media and nation building, communication and grassroots politics.

JOURN/​ENVIR ST/​LSC  823 — SCIENCE AND ENVIRONMENT COMMUNICATION

3 credits.

Course uses available scholarship and commentary to track the evolution of mass media coverage of science and the environment. Emphasis on how journalists utilize evidence, the influence of scientific and journalistic norms on stories, and the effects of mass media on science and environment messages to the public.

JOURN 824 — RACE, ETHNICITY AND MEDIA

3 credits.

This course examines key theoretical and empirical readings in the area of race/ethnicity and media.

JOURN/​LSC  825 — ETHICS AND COMMUNICATION

3 credits.

Explores critical media ethics questions shaped by practices in a disruptive digital environment.

JOURN/​LSC  826 — JOURNALISM THEORY

3 credits.

Focus on the content and purposes of journalism, explores cultural values associated with journalism, relationships between journalism and other institutions, and current issues facing journalists at a time when the profession faces many challenges.

JOURN/​POLI SCI  829 — POLITICAL COMMUNICATION

3 credits.

This course examines the role of communication in American politics. Topics covered include the communication of politics (e.g., communication by politics elites, effects of mass media and interpersonal communication on political attitudes) as well as the politics of communications (regulation of political communication, policy issues, etc.).

JOURN/​COM ARTS/​LSC  831 — PSYCHOLOGY OF ENTERTAINMENT MEDIA

3 credits.

This course is designed to provide an in-depth look into entertainment media, including its effects on individuals, social groups, and society. The focus on entertainment content is across platforms - from "mass" to social media. Emphasis will be paid to psychological, individual-level effects.

JOURN/​LSC  833 — TECHNOLOGY AND SOCIETY

3 credits.

This seminar considers the effects of new communication technologies on everyday life and political mobilization.

JOURN/​LSC  840 — STRATEGIC MASS COMMUNICATION

3 credits.

Intensive readings focusing on theories, strategies, and methods involved in the strategic uses of mass communication. The course may focus on macro or micro issues.

JOURN/​LSC  880 — TOPICS IN MASS COMMUNICATION

3 credits.

In-depth investigation of a specific topic in mass communication.

JOURN/​LSC  901 — COLLOQUIUM IN MASS COMMUNICATION

1 credit.

May be repeated to a maximum of 3 credits. Colloquium series for communication graduate students. Course will offer research presentations by mass communication scholars, and is designed to acquaint graduate students with theoretical and methodological approaches to the study of communication.

JOURN 902 — GRADUATE TEACHING COLLOQUIUM

1 credit.

Colloquium series for graduate students in fields related to communication and information studies. Course meets once per week for a teaching presentation by a guest faculty or staff member on various theoretical and practical approaches to teaching and learning in the communication and information fields.

JOURN/​HISTORY  919 — SEMINAR-HISTORY OF MASS COMMUNICATION

3 credits.

Seminar in the history of mass communication in which students are expected to produce original research based on primary documents.

JOURN 990 — THESIS

1-9 credits.

JOURN 999 — INDEPENDENT RESEARCH PROBLEMS

2-4 credits.