ECON 100 — ECONOMIC APPROACH TO CURRENT ISSUES

3-4 credits.

Emphasizes current economic issues and illustrates how the economist's perspective helps understand them. Academic readings and popular books such as Freakonomics will be used to indicate the breadth and scope of questions that can be analyzed from an economic perspective. Does not count towards the economics major.

ECON 101 — PRINCIPLES OF MICROECONOMICS

4 credits.

Economic problems of individuals, firms and industries with emphasis on value, price, and distribution of income. Must be taken before 102. Open to Fr. No honors avail

ECON 102 — PRINCIPLES OF MACROECONOMICS

3-4 credits.

Macroeconomic measurement and models of aggregate demand and supply; fiscal and monetary policy for unemployment, inflation, and growth.

ECON 109 — STUDY ABROAD IN INTRODUCTORY ECONOMICS

1-4 credits.

Provides an equivalency for introductory level economics courses taken on UW-Madison study abroad programs.

ECON 111 — PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS-ACCELERATED TREATMENT

4 credits.

Integrated treatment of macroeconomics and microeconomics (see ECON 101 and 102). Accelerated approach to economics training, especially for Econ Opt. B majors. Not open to students that have taken ECON 101 or ECON 102

ECON 228 — INTERNSHIP ECONOMICS

1 credit.

Internship in economics related field. 5 or higher in major. Completion of at least 4 economics classes at UW-Madison. Completion of at least one intermediate theory class (ECON 301 or 311, ECON 302 or 312). Approval/authorization to registrar: To be granted by the Undergraduate Committee after review of offer letter and proposal form.

ECON 299 — DIRECTED STUDY

1-3 credits.

ECON/​FINANCE  300 — INTRODUCTION TO FINANCE

3 credits.

Concepts and techniques in corporate finance and investments. Topics include the financial environment, securities markets, financial markets, financial statements and analysis, working capital management, capital budgeting, cost of capital, dividend policy, asset valuation, investments, decision making under uncertainty, mergers, options, and futures.

ECON 301 — INTERMEDIATE MICROECONOMIC THEORY

4 credits.

Contemporary theory of consumption, production, pricing and resource allocation.

ECON 302 — INTERMEDIATE MACROECONOMIC THEORY

4 credits.

Principles and theories of national income determination, analysis of savings, consumption, investment and other aggregates in the national and international economy and relation to employment, inflation and stabilization.

ECON/​HIST SCI  305 — DEVELOPMENT OF ECONOMIC THOUGHT

3-4 credits.

Development of economic thought from the middle ages to the present; emphasis on major schools of thought including Classical, Marxian, Neo-Classical, and Keynesian schools.

ECON/​A A E/​REAL EST/​URB R PL  306 — THE REAL ESTATE PROCESS

3 credits.

Introductory survey course. Decision-making processes for the manufacture, marketing, management and financing of real estate space. Survey of institutional context, economics of urbanization, historical pattern and structure of city growth, and public policy issues regarding urban environment and business management.

ECON 309 — STUDY ABROAD IN INTERMEDIATE ECONOMICS

1-4 credits.

Provides an equivalency for intermediate level economics courses taken on UW-Madison study abroad programs. Completion of an intro microecon crse an intro macroecon crse

ECON 310 — STATISTICS: MEASUREMENT IN ECONOMICS

4 credits.

Introduction to analysis of economic data. The techniques of descriptive statistics and statistical inference (hypothesis testing and estimation) as directed toward application in economic research.

ECON 311 — INTERMEDIATE MICROECONOMIC THEORY - ADVANCED TREATMENT

3 credits.

A mathematical approach to the theory of consumption, production, pricing and resource allocation. Not open to students who have taken ECON 301

ECON 312 — INTERMEDIATE MACROECONOMIC THEORY - ADVANCED TREATMENT

3 credits.

A mathematical approach to the principles and theories of national income determination, analysis of savings, consumption, investment and other aggregates in the national and international economy and relation to employment, inflation, and stabilization. Students who have completed ECON 302 or are concurrently enrolled in ECON 302 are not allowed to enroll for this class.

ECON/​FINANCE  320 — INVESTMENT THEORY

3 credits.

Structure and functioning of securities markets; principles of portfolio construction; models of the tradeoff between risk and expected return.

ECON 330 — MONEY AND BANKING

4 credits.

Monetary economics; the role of money in the determination of output, prices and interest rates; commercial and central banking, monetary policy, the international monetary system.

ECON/​A A E/​ENVIR ST  343 — ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS

3-4 credits.

Microeconomic principles underlying the use of natural resources such as air, water, forests, fisheries, minerals and energy. These principles are applied in the examination of pollution control, preservation vs. development, deforestation, and other environmental issues.

ECON 364 — SURVEY OF INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS

3-4 credits.

Contemporary theory of international trade and finance applied to current economic events. Not recommended for economics majors. Not open to students who have taken ECON 464 or ECON 301 (or 311).

ECON 390 — CONTEMPORARY ECONOMIC ISSUES

3 credits.

Topics vary; number used for experimental courses.

ECON 409 — STUDY ABROAD IN ADVANCED ECONOMICS

1-4 credits.

Provides an equivalency for advanced level economics courses taken on UW-Madison study abroad programs for which there is no exact UW-Madison equivalent. Course must be of equal rigor to those offered on campus. To receive this equivalent, departmental pre-approval is required. Completion of an intermed microecon crse and/or intermed macroecon crse

ECON 410 — INTRODUCTORY ECONOMETRICS

4 credits.

Statistical methods used in applied economic research. Topics include: survey methods and data sources; multiple regression and analysis of variance; econometric estimation; forecasting and policy applications. Undergrads have enrollment priority

ECON/​REAL EST/​URB R PL  420 — URBAN AND REGIONAL ECONOMICS

3 credits.

Nature and structure of urban economies; location of economic activity; economic analysis in an urban framework; principles of urban economic development, housing, transportation, poverty and unemployment and municipal finance. Forecasting of economic activity using census and socioeconomic data.

ECON/​A A E  421 — ECONOMIC DECISION ANALYSIS

4 credits.

Managerial oriented, applied presentation of microeconomic theory. Quantitative emphasis with extensive homework use of spreadsheets and written executive summaries of applied economic analyses. Applications on natural resources and agricultural markets.

ECON 435 — THE FINANCIAL SYSTEM

3 credits.

Continuation of 330. Banking, credit markets and financial institutions, monetary and debt management policies; relation of national monetary and credit institutions to the international system.

ECON 440 — URBAN AND REGIONAL ECONOMICS

3 credits.

Economic theories of the nature and function of cities with emphasis on classical location theory. Theory of urban and regional planning in a market economy. Examination of selected problems, e.g.: housing, land-use and transportation; urban economic history; regional development; fiscal federalism.

ECON 441 — ANALYTICAL PUBLIC FINANCE

3-4 credits.

Analyzes the problems of the public sector in dealing with domestic issues of education, urban areas, welfare, natural resources, and the environment; provides students with opportunity to apply the tools of economic analysis that are pertinent to domestic public sector problems.

ECON 442 — MACROECONOMIC POLICY

3-4 credits.

This course will address current issues in modern macroeconomic policymaking. Topics include: fiscal and monetary policy, financial and sovereign debt crisis, and financial regulation.

ECON 448 — HUMAN RESOURCES AND ECONOMIC GROWTH

3-4 credits.

Theoretical and empirical analysis of public and private investment in people, emphasizing the contribution to productivity of education, training, health, and mobility.

ECON/​ENVIR ST/​POLI SCI/​URB R PL  449 — GOVERNMENT AND NATURAL RESOURCES

3-4 credits.

Problems of public policy and administration for development and use of natural resources.

ECON 450 — WAGES AND THE LABOR MARKET

3-4 credits.

Economic and institutional forces which determine labor supply and demand; wage theories, wages in the economy, the labor force, unemployment, wages, labor mobility, functioning of labor markets.

ECON 451 — THE ECONOMIC APPROACH TO HUMAN BEHAVIOR

3 credits.

The economic analysis of "non-economic" topics such as the family, crime, politics and religion.

ECON 455 — BEHAVIORAL ECONOMICS

3-4 credits.

Empirical evidence documenting departures in human decision making from rational norms, and alternative theoretical approaches to explaining this behavior grounded based upon psychological enrichments of standard rational actor model. Topics include paradox of choice, loss aversion, time inconsistent preferences, and social preferences.

ECON 458 — INDUSTRIAL STRUCTURE AND COMPETITIVE STRATEGY

3 credits.

Analysis of competition among firms and its effect on industrial structure. Theoretical models and case studies are used. Topics include: entry barriers, price competition dynamics, entry and exit strategies, and competitive tactics such as product differentiation, advertising, and technological change.

ECON 460 — ECONOMIC FORECASTING

3-4 credits.

Introduction to econometric time series analysis, forecasting methods, and forecast evaluation. The course will cover theoretical, methodological and applied topics, and much of the work will be hands-on data analysis.

ECON/​A A E/​INTL BUS  462 — LATIN AMERICAN ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

3 credits.

A historico-institutional analysis of development problems in the principal Latin American countries, with attention to differentiation of national growth patterns and alternative development strategies.

ECON 464 — INTERNATIONAL TRADE AND FINANCE

3-4 credits.

Contemporary theory of international trade and finance developed and applied to current problems in international economic relations.

ECON/​HISTORY  465 — THE AMERICAN ECONOMY TO 1865

3-4 credits.

Survey of the forces underlying American economic development and the distribution of income; rise of regional economies; origins of manufacturing; effects of slavery; influence of government and politics on growth.

ECON/​HISTORY  466 — THE AMERICAN ECONOMY SINCE 1865

3-4 credits.

Emergence of the large corporation; growth and instability since the mid-nineteenth century; increasing government participation in the economy; the impact of war, depression, discrimination, and international responsibilities.

ECON 467 — INTERNATIONAL INDUSTRIAL ORGANIZATIONS

3-4 credits.

Study of competition among firms in an international environment (theoretical analysis and policy applications). Topics include: strategic trade, trade agreements and intellectual property rights issues, RD and technology transfers, multinational firms.

ECON 468 — INDUSTRIAL ORGANIZATION AND IMPERFECT COMPETITION

3-4 credits.

An overview of the theory of industrial organization, including the study of oligopolistic behavior, monopolistic competition, product differentiation and the dynamic behavior of competitive industries under uncertainty.

ECON/​A A E  473 — ECONOMIC GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT IN SOUTHEAST ASIA

3 credits.

Evaluates economic development strategies in Southeast Asia and their inplications for growth, distribution and environment. Students learn trade and development theory as well as specific knowledge of Southeast Asian economic development.

ECON/​A A E  474 — ECONOMIC PROBLEMS OF DEVELOPING AREAS

3 credits.

Analyzes aggregate growth, income distribution and poverty in lower income economies. Uses microeconomics of imperfect labor, capital and insurance markets to explore why some individuals advance economically as their economies grow and others fall behind. Considers implications of aggregate and micro analysis for national and international economic policy.

ECON 475 — ECONOMICS OF GROWTH

3-4 credits.

Theoretical analysis of issues in growth and development. Models will be motivated by country experiences. Topics include: factors affecting saving, investment and cross-country differentials on per capita income; the role of government institutions, market regulation, technology and trade.

ECON/​A A E  477 — AGRICULTURAL AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT IN AFRICA

3 credits.

Composition, organization, and techniques of agricultural production; economic change and development of agriculture, economic policies, special problems of developing African agriculture.

ECON 502 — ECONOMICS OF TRANSPORTATION

3 credits.

Influence of transport costs on economic development, industrial location and market penetration; economic characteristics of carriers; pricing policies and practices in transport; interrelationship of public policy issues and decisions by suppliers and users of transportation.

ECON 503 — MARKETS WITH FRICTIONS

3-4 credits.

Search theory provides framework for understanding markets; is used to study questions in monetary, public, financial economics. This course will develop theoretical tools used to introduce frictions in formal models; will address the role of frictions in several applied scenarios.

ECON 508 — WEALTH AND INCOME

3 credits.

Origins of inequality in income and wealth -- bequests, human capital, property division, productivity, and demographic change. Primary focus on the United States, with some international comparisons. Measurement of redistribution effected by social insurance, inflation, and tax-transfer systems. Empirical, oriented towards policy analysis and measurement.

ECON 521 — GAME THEORY AND ECONOMIC ANALYSIS

3-4 credits.

The study of multi-agent, interactive decision problems, with emphasis on questions of coordination, cooperation and conflict. Applications include relations between countries, competition between firms, bargaining between unions and firms, and contests between political candidates.

ECON 522 — LAW AND ECONOMICS

3-4 credits.

Economic analysis of legal rules and institutions with emphases on how different areas of law influence individual incentives. Specific topics include: (1) property, (2) contracts, (3) torts, (4) legal procedure and (5) criminal law.

ECON/​PHILOS  524 — PHILOSOPHY AND ECONOMICS

3 credits.

Economics examined from the viewpoint of the philosophy of science. Normative and positive aspects of economic theory. Deterministic and statistical explanation. Arrow impossibility theorem. Radical economics. Team taught by a philosopher and an economist.

ECON 525 — ECONOMICS OF EDUCATION: THEORY AND MEASUREMENT

3 credits.

Application of theoretical and empirical methods of economics to education policy. Emphasis in econometrics analysis and critical evaluation of empirical research. Writing intensive course.

ECON/​A A E  526 — QUANTITATIVE METHODS IN AGRICULTURAL AND APPLIED ECONOMICS

4 credits.

Use of quantitative methods (mathematics, statistics, and optimization) to analyze problems faced by decision makers in natural resources and agriculture. Extensive homework requiring use of quantitative methods via spreadsheet tools to solve problems from an applied decision context.

ECON/​A A E/​F&W ECOL  531 — NATURAL RESOURCE ECONOMICS

3 credits.

Economic concepts and tools relating to management and use of natural resources, including pricing principles, cost-benefit analysis, equity, externalities, economic rent, renewable and nonrenewable resources, and resource policy issues.

ECON/​POP HLTH/​PUB AFFR  548 — THE ECONOMICS OF HEALTH CARE

3-4 credits.

Analysis of the health care industry. Markets for hospitals and physicians' care, markets for health manpower, and the role of health insurance.

ECON/​A A E  567 — PUBLIC FINANCE IN LESS DEVELOPED COUNTRIES

3 credits.

Potential and limitations of fiscal policy as a development instrument in low-income countries; tax harmonization in economic integration; case studies in tax reform; budgeting and planning.

ECON 580 — HONORS TUTORIAL IN RESEARCH PROJECT DESIGN

3 credits.

Students will be required to criticize research by others, to draft a research proposal and to complete a project that requires original research.

ECON 581 — HONORS THESIS

3 credits.

Students will work on their honor thesis.

ECON 590 — TUTORIAL IN RESEARCH PROJECT DESIGN

3 credits.

Students will be required to draft a research proposal that is analogous to a NSF proposal or a Ph.D. prospectus and critique research proposals and existing undergraduate theses. They will also complete a project that requires original research incorporating one of the following: use of statistical software; simulation experiment using existing software; design and pretest a human subjects experiment; draft an interview instrument; or a comparable project. Student may be enrolled in 410 at same time.

ECON 606 — MATHEMATICAL ECONOMICS II

3-4 credits.

Advanced mathematical topics and techniques used in economic analysis. Deterministic and Stochastic Control Theory emphasized.

ECON 623 — POPULATION ECONOMICS

3-4 credits.

Examination of economic determinants of population change and demographic behavior including household formation, marriage, child bearing and rearing, mortality (especially infant) and key forms of human capital investments including schooling and migration.

ECON/​REAL EST/​URB R PL  641 — HOUSING ECONOMICS AND POLICY

3 credits.

The economic principles underlying the dynamics of the housing market; filtering, neighborhood decline and abandonment gentrification, tenure choice, mortgage choice, prepayment, mobility, mortgage default, submarket identification, racial discrimination and segregation. Examination of governmental programs affecting the housing market and their objectives and impacts; public and subsidized housing, zoning and land use regulation, rent and price controls, property and income tax policy.

ECON/​SOC  663 — POPULATION AND SOCIETY

3 credits.

Social and economic determinants and consequences of contemporary and historical population trends in both developed and developing societies. Fertility, mortality, migration, population distribution, age structure, population growth.

ECON 664 — ADVANCED INTERNATIONAL TRADE

3 credits.

Policies relating to trade, tariffs, balance of payments, and aid programs, with special emphasis on recent developments and the role played by the United States.

ECON 666 — ISSUES IN INTERNATIONAL FINANCE

3-4 credits.

Modern institutions, history, and controversies of international financial relations. Foreign exchange market, the Euro-currency banking system, and central bank intervention in both.

ECON/​A A E/​ENVIR ST/​URB R PL  671 — ENERGY ECONOMICS

3 credits.

The method, application, and limitations of traditional economic approaches to the study of energy problems. Topics include microeconomic foundations of energy demand and supply; optimal pricing and allocation of energy resources; energy market structure, conduct, and performance; macro linkages of energy and the economy; and the economics of regulatory and other public policy approaches to the social control of energy.

ECON 681 — SENIOR HONORS THESIS

3 credits.

ECON 682 — SENIOR HONORS THESIS

3 credits.

Continuation of 681

ECON 690 — TOPICS IN ECONOMICS

2-4 credits.

Topics in economic theory and policy.

ECON 691 — SENIOR THESIS

1-3 credits.

For Econ majors not in the Honors Program.

ECON 692 — SENIOR THESIS

1-3 credits.

Continuation of 691

ECON 698 — DIRECTED STUDY

1-4 credits.

ECON 699 — DIRECTED STUDY

1-4 credits.

ECON 700 — MATHEMATICS FOR ECONOMISTS

3 credits.

Mathematical techniques used in economics analysis at a Master level. Topics include: proof techniques, optimization, introductory topology, functional analysis, linear algebra for microeconomists and differential equations.

ECON 701 — MICROECONOMICS I

3 credits.

First course in a two-semester sequence covering: consumer theory, producer theory, and markets under partial and general equilibrium, and with externalities or market power. The sequence will include an introduction to decision theory and game theory, and applications to auction theory and partially informed trade.

ECON 702 — MACROECONOMICS I

3 credits.

First master's level macroeconomics course. A mathematical approach to the study of aggregate output determination, including analysis of consumption, labor markets, economic growth, and business cycles. Analysis of fiscal and monetary policies and their interactions.

ECON 703 — MATHEMATICAL ECONOMICS I

3-4 credits.

A survey of mathematical techniques used in economic analysis. Linear algebra and optimization techniques are emphasized.

ECON 704 — ECONOMETRICS I

3 credits.

Econometric methods, theory, and applications. Matrix algebra will be used. Topics include linear regression, least-squares estimation, inference, and hypothesis testing. Suitable for graduate (master's level) students.

ECON 705 — ECONOMETRICS II

3 credits.

Econometric methods, theory, and applications. Topics include instrumental variables, GMM, panel data, limited dependent variables, time series, and vector autoregressions.

ECON 706 — ECONOMETRICS III

3 credits.

This course focuses on using econometric methods to address empirical questions, conduct empirical research, and write empirical papers in economics.

ECON/​A A E  707 — INSTITUTIONAL ECONOMICS

3 credits.

Comparative analysis of neoclassical and institutional economics, with emphasis on economic epistemology, agency theory, transaction costs, firms and markets, property rights, externalities, welfare economics, efficiency, and rules of social choice.

ECON 708 — MICROECONOMICS II

3 credits.

Second course in a two-semester sequence covering: consumer theory, producer theory, and markets under partial and general equilibrium, and with externalities or market power. The sequence will include an introduction to decision theory and game theory, and applications to auction theory and partially informed trade.

ECON 709 — ECONOMIC STATISTICS AND ECONOMETRICS I

3-4 credits.

Probability distributions, statistical inference; multiple linear regression; introduction to econometric methods.

ECON 710 — ECONOMIC STATISTICS AND ECONOMETRICS II

3-4 credits.

Extensions of the linear regression model; introduction to multiple equation models.

ECON 711 — ECONOMIC THEORY-MICROECONOMICS SEQUENCE

3 credits.

First course in a two-semester sequence: theories of firms, consumers, and markets; or partial and general equilibria in market and centralized economies; topics in welfare economics.

ECON 712 — ECONOMIC THEORY-MACROECONOMICS SEQUENCE

3 credits.

First course in a two semester sequence: commodity, money and labor markets, their components and general equilibrium; intertemporal optimization and growth theory.

ECON 713 — ECONOMIC THEORY: MICROECONOMICS SEQUENCE

3 credits.

Continuation of 711.

ECON 714 — ECONOMIC THEORY; MACROECONOMICS SEQUENCE

3 credits.

Continuation of 712.

ECON 715 — ECONOMETRIC METHODS

3 credits.

Statistical models and methods relevant to estimation and testing of economic relationships.

ECON 716 — ECONOMETRIC METHODS

3 credits.

Continuation of 715

ECON 717 — APPLIED ECONOMETRICS

3 credits.

Mathematical formulation and empirical implementation of economic theory.

ECON 718 — TOPICS IN APPLIED ECONOMETRICS

3 credits.

Continuation of 717

ECON 719 — ECONOMIC STATISTICS AND ECONOMETRICS III

3-4 credits.

Applications of econometric techniques to the analysis of production, consumer demand, and the national economy.

ECON/​PUB AFFR/​URB R PL  734 — REGIONAL ECONOMIC PROBLEM ANALYSIS

3 credits.

Examination of major theories of regional economic development, with special emphasis upon the evolution and amelioration of regional economic problems. Selected techniques of regional analysis, including economic base multipliers, input/output models, and shift-share analysis are used in the context of setting regional development goals.

ECON 735 — MONETARY AND FINANCIAL THEORY

3 credits.

Advanced appraisal of theory and institutions of the financial system, monetary theory, the credit system and financial intermediaries.

ECON 736 — MACROECONOMIC POLICY

3 credits.

Theoretical, empirical, and institutional aspects of the use of monetary, fiscal, and income policies to affect inflation, unemployment, and other policy goals.

ECON 741 — THEORY OF PUBLIC FINANCE AND FISCAL POLICY

3 credits.

Theoretical development of the functions of government in a mixed economy; welfare criteria for efficient government expenditures and taxation; nature of public goods and of redistribution activities of governments. Program budgeting and theoretical issues in cost-benefit analysis.

ECON 742 — THEORY OF PUBLIC FINANCE AND FISCAL POLICY

3 credits.

Incidence of tax burdens and expenditure benefits on relative incomes; effect of taxation on microeconomic decisions relating to work effort, investment, and consumption; analysis of the stabilization, growth, and debt management policies in the context of the economy as a whole; problems in international taxation.

ECON/​A A E  747 — FRONTIERS IN AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS 2

3 credits.

Organization, design, and performance of food and agricultural markets. Industrial organization; firm boundaries, contracting, and collective action; spatial, temporal, and quality dimensions of market design.

ECON 750 — LABOR ECONOMICS

3 credits.

Theoretical and empirical analysis of labor markets, labor mobility, the determination of earnings and employment, and labor supply of the household unit; emphasizes recent research on current issues in public policy.

ECON 751 — SURVEY OF INSTITUTIONAL ASPECTS OF LABOR ECONOMICS

3 credits.

Taught on a modular basis: Labor Theories and Labor History; Union Political Activities; Collective Bargaining and Public Policy. For use in analysis of problems in areas of labor markets, wages and human resources.

ECON 761 — INDUSTRIAL ORGANIZATION THEORY

3 credits.

A review of theories of the firm, oligopoly, and imperfect competition. Includes applications of economic theory and game theory to agency theory, product diversity, technological change, and strategic behavior by firms--among other problems.

ECON 762 — EMPIRICAL ANALYSIS OF INDUSTRIAL ORGANIZATION AND PUBLIC POLICY

3 credits.

A study of measurement in industrial organization and a survey of empirical tests of hypotheses in the field. The theory and practice of antitrust is also covered. Each student will produce an original piece of research.

ECON/​GEN BUS/​STAT  775 — INTRODUCTION TO BAYESIAN DECISION AND CONTROL I

3 credits.

Common sampling models in business and economic problems, information from data, likelihood function of parameters, choices of models, Bayes' Theorem, subjective basis for probability, sequential nature of Bayesian inference, prior and posterior distributions of parameters in binomial, poisson, exponential and normal populations, comparison of two normal distributions, predictive distributions, decision theory, utility, risk aversion, extensive form of analysis, two-action problems, point estimation, best population problems, economics of sampling.

ECON 805 — ADVANCED MICROECONOMIC THEORY I

3 credits.

Economic behavior under uncertainty; measure of risk, information structure, stock market and asset pricing, insurance theory, asymmetric information and incentive mechanisms.

ECON 806 — ADVANCED MICROECONOMIC THEORY II

3 credits.

General equilibrium analysis existence and computation of fixed points and competitive equilibrium, regular economics, core, non-competitive approach to perfect competition and monopolistic competition.

ECON 809 — TOPICS IN MICROECONOMIC THEORY

1-3 credits.

Topics in microeconomic theory. Subject changes each semester; may be repeated.

ECON 810 — ADVANCED MACROECONOMIC THEORY

3 credits.

ECON 836 — APPLIED MACROECONOMETRIC ANALYSIS

3 credits.

Analysis of theoretical and implementational problems of conducting multi-instrument stabilization policy. Topics: political-economic interface, policy-oriented macro models, the structures of large American econometric models, and selected problems experienced in coordinating policy instruments in recent years.

ECON/​URB R PL  845 — ADVANCED TOPICS IN PUBLIC FINANCE

1-4 credits.

Advanced public finance problems and literature, research; subject changes each semester; may be repeated. Modules.

ECON/​POP HLTH  848 — HEALTH ECONOMICS

1-3 credits.

Health economics issues including demand, supply and pricing, market structure, medical malpractice, technological change, value of life, role of insurance, and other aspects of uncertainty.

ECON 871 — ADVANCED INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS

3 credits.

General equilibrium algebraic and geometric modeling of open economies with balanced trade, and the welfare economics of international exchange and barriers thereto.

ECON 872 — ADVANCED INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS

3 credits.

Algebraic and geometric modeling of open macroeconomics with unbalanced trade and payments, focussing analytically on the foreign exchange market and the determinants of the exchange rate.

ECON 873 — SEMINAR-INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS

2-3 credits.

Individual research and group discussion of selected topics in the theory of international trade.

ECON 877 — ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT-THEORY STATISTICS AND POLICY

2-3 credits.

Theories and issues of economic growth, with special reference to underdeveloped areas; comparative growth experience, statistical measurement; case studies of the objectives and patterns of planning.

ECON 878 — ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT-THEORY STATISTICS & POLICY

2-3 credits.

Continuation of 877

ECON 880 — QUANTITATIVE ECONOMIC POLICY

1-3 credits.

ECON 899 — RECENT ADVANCES IN ECONOMICS

1-3 credits.

Selections from all fields of economic research. Content changes each semester. May be repeated.

ECON 901 — WORKSHOP IN MATHEMATICAL ECONOMIC THEORY

1-7 credits.

ECON 902 — WORKSHOP IN ECONOMIC THEORY

1-7 credits.

Critical discussion of topics in the field of economic theory.

ECON 903 — WORKSHOP ON INDUSTRIAL ORGANIZATION

1-7 credits.

Current research on the operation of markets in which individuals and firms act with imperfect information, are limited in their responses, may purchase heterogeneous commodities or factor services, and are concerned with conflicting goals.

ECON 904 — WORKSHOP ON INDUSTRIAL ORGANIZATION

1-7 credits.

Continuation of 903

ECON 913 — WORKSHOP IN ECONOMETRICS

1-7 credits.

Current research in econometric model building, estimation and inference in econometrics

ECON 914 — WORKSHOP IN ECONOMETRICS

1-7 credits.

Continuation of 913

ECON/​ANTHRO/​C&E SOC/​SOC  925 — SEMINAR: SOCIO-ECONOMIC CHANGE IN UNDERDEVELOPED AREAS

2-3 credits.

Social and economic factors relating to stability, growth, and change in the non-Western areas of the contemporary world.

ECON 955 — WORKSHOP IN LABOR ECONOMICS

1-7 credits.

Analysis of current research in wage determination and the functioning of labor markets.

ECON 956 — WORKSHOP IN LABOR ECONOMICS

1-7 credits.

Continuation of 955.

ECON/​LAW  961 — SELECTED PROBLEMS IN TRADE REGULATION-SEMINAR

2-3 credits.

Topics reflect interests of instructor and students.

ECON 965 — WORKSHOP ON QUANTITATIVE MACRO-ECONOMIC ANALYSIS

1-7 credits.

Current research on macroeconomic models, monetary theory and policy, the theory of portfolio selection, and the allocative and distributive performance of capital markets.

ECON 966 — WORKSHOP ON QUANTITATIVE MACRO-ECONOMIC ANALYSIS

1-7 credits.

Continuation of 965

ECON 968 — WORKSHOP ON PUBLIC ECONOMICS

1-7 credits.

Individual research and group discussion of public expenditure programs with attention to investment in human capital, education, training, health information, and welfare programs. Reports on research in progress by students, staff, visiting scholars.

ECON 969 — WORKSHOP ON PUBLIC ECONOMICS

1-7 credits.

Continuation of 968

ECON 977 — WORKSHOP IN INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS

1-7 credits.

Current research in international trade; a wide range of topics in theory, quantitative analysis, statistics, and policy. For graduate students in their second or later years when working on theses.

ECON 978 — WORKSHOP IN INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS

1-7 credits.

Continuation of 977

ECON/​AFRICAN/​ANTHRO/​GEOG/​HISTORY/​POLI SCI  983 — INTERDEPARTMENTAL SEMINAR-AFRICAN STUDIES

3 credits.

Interdisciplinary inquiry in African society and culture.

ECON 990 — THESIS

2-9 credits.

ECON 999 — INDEPENDENT WORK

2-9 credits.