E P D 151 — TECHNICAL INFORMATION RESOURCES

1 credit.

Development of information retrieval skills and effective search strategies, focusing on technical information resources appropriate for engineers and scientists. Selection and use of electronic bibliographic databases, indexes and abstracts, patents and government information, library catalogs, and computer networks will be integral to individual and team projects.

E P D 155 — BASIC COMMUNICATION

2 credits.

Emphasis on writing and critical reading. Planning, preparing, and revising informative and persuasive communication; adapting writing for intended audiences; grammar, usage and style; critical reading of prose models in the sciences and humanities; using information resources; videotaped oral presentations; collaborative writing using computers. Stdts may receive degree cr for only one Com A crse taken in residence

E P D 199 — FRESHMAN INDEPENDENT STUDY

1-3 credits.

E P D 265 — TEAMS AND THE ENGINEERING PROFESSION

1 credit.

The communication strategies necessary for effective teamwork in engineering and science professions is the focus of this project-based course. Project options include international, ethical, and engineering business plan issues. Key communication elements are team structures, interpersonal skills, team theories, application, and evaluation.

E P D 275 — TECHNICAL PRESENTATIONS

2 credits.

This course focuses on the principles and theory of effective oral technical presentations and provides a framework for applying the principles in professional settings common to the engineering profession. The course consists of five parts: 1) preparation, delivery, and evaluation of oral presentation on technical subjects, 2) analysis of professional "real-world" technical presentations, 3) survey of presentation technology, 4) self-analysis including listening and non-verbal skills, and 5) practice of group discussion and interview skills.

E P D 299 — SOPHOMORE INDEPENDENT STUDY

1-3 credits.

E P D 305 — BASIC CHINESE FOR PROFESSIONALS I

3 credits.

Fundamental elements of written and spoken communication in Chinese, primarily in a business context, supported by relevant cultural information.

E P D/​E ASIAN  330 — BASIC TECHNICAL JAPANESE I

3 credits.

Introduces the three types of Japanese writing and most grammar necessary for reading technical writing in the sciences.

E P D/​E ASIAN  332 — BASIC TECHNICAL JAPANESE II

3 credits.

Completes the grammar necessary for reading technical writing in the sciences. Concludes with individual projects in specialized fields.

E P D 355 — INTERMEDIATE BUSINESS CHINESE FOR PROFESSIONALS I

3 credits.

Professionals will learn the business vocabulary and the patterns of communication they will need in order to conduct business in a Chinese-language environment. Part one of a two-course sequence.

E P D 356 — INTERMEDIATE BUSINESS CHINESE FOR PROFESSIONALS II

3 credits.

Professionals will learn the business vocabulary and the patterns of communication they will need in order to conduct business in a Chinese-language environment. Part two of a two-course sequence.

E P D/​E ASIAN  374 — INTERMEDIATE TECHNICAL JAPANESE I

3 credits.

Fundamentals of Japanese grammar and the most frequent 300 Kanji in the physical sciences; reading, comprehending and translating Japanese scientific texts. Does not satisfy LS language or major requirement

E P D/​E ASIAN  375 — INTERMEDIATE TECHNICAL JAPANESE II

3 credits.

Continuation of 374; development of a Kanji frequency list and translation of a technical article. Does not satisfy LS language or major requirement

E P D/​E ASIAN  377 — BUSINESS JAPANESE COMMUNICATION

3 credits.

Improvement of oral and written communication skills that are specific to business contexts. Review of essential grammar and honorific expressions for proper styles of communication. Development of the understanding of cultural and geographical factors that influence business practices in Japan.

E P D 378 — NETWORK SKILLS FOR REMOTE LEARNERS

1 credit.

This course is designed to provide students with the knowledge, skills, and attitudes they need to be efficient and effective independent learners in a networked environment. The three primary modules for the course include: learning management, information management, and computer skills.

E P D 395 — ELEMENTS OF COMPUTER-ASSISTED PUBLISHING

3 credits.

This course focuses on concepts of the writing-to-publishing process and computer-assisted publishing. It integrates principles of technical writing and graphic design with the use of microcomputers. Laboratory work includes the design of a technical document.

E P D 397 — TECHNICAL COMMUNICATION

3 credits.

Communication for engineering, science, and technology; theory and practice in planning, preparing, and critiquing reports, proposals, instructions, and business correspondence; research strategies, collaborative work; oral presentations.

E P D 398 — TECHNICAL COMMUNICATIONS INTERNSHIP

1 credit.

Two component course: 1) professional writing experience entailing approximately 80 hours internship with a local corporation, industry, government agency, or educational unit; and 2) one 50 minute class every other week to structure the internship and provide discussion of related issues.

E P D 399 — JUNIOR INDEPENDENT STUDY

1-3 credits.

E P D 416 — ENGINEERING APPLICATIONS OF STATISTICS

3 credits.

Course provides knowledge and skills to apply statistics to many types of engineering problems. Focuses on developing statistically-based experimental techniques and tests for measures of validity, application of computer-based statistical tools, and approaches to distillation of data.

E P D 470 — ENGINEERING PROBLEM SOLVING WITH COMPUTERS

3 credits.

Develops computer-assisted skills necessary for solving complex engineering problems. Uses a series of case studies that develop techniques for solving linear and nonlinear algebraic systems, optimization problems, data approximation problems, and systems of ordinary differential equations.

E P D 497 — TECHNICAL EDITING

1 credit.

Principles and practices of editing technical and scientific documents. Overview of the editing process; defining the editor's rules and responsibilities, revising at structural and sentence levels, and addressing stylistic conventions of technical fields. Application to technical and scientific documents such as reports, proposals, and user manuals.

E P D 499 — SENIOR INDEPENDENT STUDY

1-3 credits.

E P D 518 — QUALITY ENGINEERING AND QUALITY MANAGEMENT

3 credits.

The overall purpose of this course is to enhance the learners' basic business and decision-making skills related to quality systems and process improvement.

E P D 597 — TECHNICAL AND PROFESSIONAL COMMUNICATION

3 credits.

This course emphasizes essential concepts and strategies of effective written and oral communication. Topics include writing, documenting, and publishing individual and collaborative research and technical projects; managing communication aspects of technical projects; oral presentations, conference skills, theses and dissertations.

E P D/​E ASIAN  601 — JAPANESE FOR BUSINESS AND INDUSTRY

3-4 credits.

Business language and commercial practices in contemporary Japanese society.

E P D/​E ASIAN  602 — JAPANESE FOR POLITICS AND GOVERNMENT

3-4 credits.

Language and patterns of expression used in political discourse and policymaking in Japan.

E P D 603 — ADVANCED TECHNICAL JAPANESE SEMINAR

3-4 credits.

Students will read an intermediate/advanced Japanese university textbook in the sciences and view videotaped lectures by Japanese university faculty members in parallel with the content of the textbook.

E P D 604 — RESEARCH IN JAPANESE TECHNICAL LITERATURE

2-6 credits.

Graduate students in the sciences and engineering pursue individual projects to explore recent Japanese literature in their research fields.

E P D 611 — ENGINEERING ECONOMICS AND MANAGEMENT

3 credits.

This course addresses principles and practices of interpreting financial information and performing engineering-related economic analyses. This course focuses on the practical use of economic information for decision-making. The four course modules are: 1) Basic Accounting Concepts; 2) Management Concepts; 3)Pricing and Product Decisions; and 4) Systems.

E P D 612 — TECHNICAL PROJECT MANAGEMENT

3 credits.

Learn key principles and tools of project management applicable to a broad range of engineering projects. The course covers techniques for project planning, scheduling, resource allocation, and project tracking, as well as the interface between projects and the organizations within which they are executed.

E P D 613 — INTERNATIONAL ENGINEERING STRATEGIES AND OPERATIONS

3 credits.

Provides a comparative examination and analysis of global trends and regional variations for engineering concepts, standards and practices. Using organizational case studies, the course will describe and analyze multi-national engineering operations and summarize best practices and caveats.

E P D 615 — INDEPENDENT READING AND RESEARCH IN APPLIED ENGINEERING

2 credits.

Conduct independent reading and research in an applied engineering topic of student's choice under the guidance of a UW faculty member or project mentor. Learn and use a variety of in-depth research techniques with assistance from Wendt Engineering Library. Employ a thorough understanding of genre conventions to craft an in-depth proposal, literature review, and technical presentation for distinct practitioner audiences. Present results of research at subsequent Master of Engineering in Engineering Management residency public session in late August.

E P D 617 — COMMUNICATING TECHNICAL INFORMATION

3 credits.

Develops skills necessary for engineering professionals to communicate technical and managerial information. Covers approaches for communicating to diverse audiences and for action-oriented purposes. Emphasizes communication problem solving and communication efficiency. Includes individual and collaborative projects using oral, written, and electronic media.

E P D 618 — APPLIED LEADERSHIP AND MANAGEMENT OF ENGINEERING ORGANIZATIONS

3 credits.

Addresses strategies, models, and practices for leading and managing engineering organizations in a context directly relevant to practicing engineers. Students will engage in self-reflection about styles, beliefs, and past experiences with leadership and management. Course project of direct relevance to student's organization will integrate theory, models, case studies, and real-time experiences from student's workplace. Students will gain broad exposure to diverse approaches to leadership and management, and a deeper understanding of how to put what is being learned into effective action.

E P D 622 — ENGINE DESIGN I

2 credits.

The overall purpose of this course is to provide the learners with an understanding of engine applications, customer need assessment, and engineering product planning. S. in engr or equiv. EPD 621

E P D 623 — ENGINE DESIGN II

4 credits.

The overall purpose of this course is to provide the learners with an advanced understanding of internal combustion engine design. S. in engr or equiv. EPD 621 622

E P D 624 — ENGINE PERFORMANCE AND COMBUSTION

4 credits.

Provides learners with a physically based understanding of combustion, efficiency, and exhaust emission formation and control in internal combustion engines. S. in engr or equiv

E P D 625 — ENGINE FLUID DYNAMICS

3 credits.

The overall purpose of this course is to provide the learners with a physically based understanding of fluid dynamics and air handling system design in internal combustion engines. S. in engr or equiv

E P D 626 — ENGINE PROJECT MANAGEMENT

3 credits.

Learn and practice how to plan, manage, and control a variety of projects, from simple design exercises to the complete design, analysis, development and release to production of a new engine. S. in engr or equiv

E P D 627 — PERSPECTIVES ON ENGINE MODELING

2 credits.

Learn about problem definition and planning, tool selection, model construction, calibration, application and data presentation in order to integrate the most appropriate modeling tools into an engine design and development project. S. in engr or equiv

E P D 628 — ANALYSIS OF TRENDS IN ENGINES

2 credits.

Take a scientifically-based look at trends in energy availability, emission control and refulation, and technological advances to make an assessment of the future of engines and powertrain systems for vehicles throughout the world. S. in Engineering or equivalent

E P D 629 — ENGINE SYSTEMS AND CONTROLS

4 credits.

Explore fundamental control concepts for development and analysis, modeling requirements and considerations related to control and diagnostics, and the application of these tools to engine systems. S. in Engineering or equivalent

E P D 641 — ESSENTIAL SKILLS FOR ENGINEERING PRODUCTIVITY

2 credits.

Essential Skills for Engineering Productivity (ESEP) provides the knowledge, skills and attitudes needed to be efficient and effective independent learners in a networked environment. This course focuses on key concepts and critical skills for remote learning, teamwork, working with colleagues at a distance, and engineering productivity. Additionally, a large component of this course teaches effective ways of getting engineering information across to large or small audiences in live or web based presentations.

E P D 642 — THERMAL SYSTEMS ENGINEERING

2 credits.

Use the 1st and 2nd laws of thermodynamics in the analysis of engines, and utilize ideal gas mixture, thermodynamics and combustion principles to determine adiabatic flame temperature and chemical equilibrium. S. in Engineering or equiv

E P D 643 — ANALYSIS OF TRENDS IN ENGINES - LEGISLATIVE DRIVERS AND ALTERNATIVE FUELS

1 credit.

With a scientifically-based approach, this course will consider trends in energy availability, emission control and regulation, and technological advances for assessing the future of engines and powertrain systems in vehicle applications throughout the world. S. in Engineering or equivalent

E P D 644 — ANALYSIS OF TRENDS IN ENGINES - POWERTRAIN TECHNOLOGIES AND MANUFACTURING

1 credit.

Take a scientifically-based look at trends in technological advances to make an assessment of the future of engines and powertrain systems for vehicles throughout the world as well as manufacturing constraints on future development of engines. S. in Engineering or equivalent.

E P D 654 — TEACHING IN SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

2-3 credits.

Introduction to teaching and learning in science and engineering at the college level. Includes exploration of the learning process, teaching methodology, assessment strategies, course design, teaching philosophies, and careers in education, science, and engineering.

E P D 660 — CORE COMPETENCIES OF SUSTAINABILITY

3 credits.

Introduces real-world pragmatic skills and applications in sustainability competencies. Content reaches across engineering expertise, from chemical engineering to buildings to product design and energy. Modules cover ecological footprinting, lifecycle assessment, resource use and integrated engineering practice.

E P D 661 — INDUSTRIAL ECOLOGY: SUSTAINABILITY TOOLS IN CONTEXT

3 credits.

Introduces sustainability frameworks and addresses industrial ecology by learning how and when to use a range of tools that offer systems thinking perspectives (e.g. Mass Flow analysis, Footprinting, SLCA, SWOT, EIOLCA, LCA, MIPS). Assist in constructing an evaluation matrix to evaluate tool application contexts, and discuss the relationship between optimizing systems through the use of tools and larger sustainability issues/goals.

E P D 663 — ENGINEERING SUSTAINABILITY AND SOCIETY SEMINAR AND CONFERENCE

1 credit.

Each April, the University of Wisconsin Nelson Institute for Environmentaltudies hosts an Earth Day Conference in Madison, Wisconsin. The conference provides a forum for a diverse community of academia, industry and the community to discuss environmental, social, and economic aspects of sustainability. This online course prepares students in the Master of Engineering Sustainable Systems Engineering program to attend this conference through research projects and classroom discussion prior to Earth Day on the conference theme and its relationship with engineering practice. Students then travel to Madison, Wisconsin for the conference and discussion with faculty before and after the conference (travel expenses not included with tuition). Additional discussion and student presentations follow in the weeks after the conference.

E P D 669 — SUSTAINABLE SYSTEMS ENGINEERING CAPSTONE

3 credits.

The Sustainable Systems Engineering (SSE) Capstone gives teams of students the opportunity to demonstrate their ability to think globally, sustainably, and creatively. Throughout this course, students will gain real-world experience by applying theory, tools, and research to conceptualize, analyze, and design a solution to a real-world problem within a social and environmental context. Projects should showcase the knowledge and analytical skills acquired during the SSE program, and integrate tools, science and communication to address a community or industry need. Students will also work with an industry mentor and customer throughout their project.

E P D 690 — SPECIAL TOPICS IN ENGINEERING PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

1-3 credits.

E P D 699 — INDEPENDENT STUDY

1-3 credits.

E P D 700 — CONNECTED LEARNING ESSENTIALS

1 credit.

The course is designed to provide students with the knowledge, skills and abilities needed to be efficient and effective learners in a networked environment. The course recognizes that the role of "learner" is only one of many roles that you must play in your busy life. It strives to help you become easily adaptable to digital tools and technologies. The course cannot address all network and computing situations required by a student or professional, but will focus on key concepts, orientation, and critical skills that have been identified as key professional competencies of a digitally literate professional. You will learn key concepts to be an effective online learner and connected professional. This includes: tools and strategies for online learning; efficient time and attention management; tools and best practices for online collaboration and communication; and techniques for the continuous improvement of skills in all applicable facets of digital professional work. The goals of the course are to teach a strategic approach to learning online and to impart critical professional competencies for future success.

E P D 701 — WRITING FOR PROFESSIONALS

1 credit.

Professional Writing is an online course in the Professional Literacy Course suite. The goal of this 1-credit, 8-week course is to prepare students to produce effective written communication that is suitable for inter-professional and inter-disciplinary audiences in a variety of workplaces. Assignments apply strategies and tools introduced in live web conferences and readings to common informal and formal workplace writing, including email, memos, proposals and executive summaries.

E P D 702 — PROFESSIONAL PRESENTATIONS

1 credit.

In this course, you will sharpen your ability to create, edit, review, and present information in an efficient, clear, and effective way for your audiences. The course will develop your presentation skills through a series of presentations related to your professional interests and work.

E P D/​L I S  703 — MANAGING DIGITAL INFORMATION

1 credit.

This course helps professionals to effectively and ethically protect and organize the information that they collect, create, and manage. It also presents collaboration tools and techniques for information creation and management.

E P D 704 — ORGANIZATIONAL COMMUNICATION AND PROBLEM SOLVING

1 credit.

One of the most important processes in complex organizations is judgment, problem-solving, and decision-making. This course aims to help people improve their problem solving within complex organizations with a special emphasis on case studies and improving communication. The material will be from cross-discipline sources (organizational behavior, organizational communication, social psychology). The first part of the course will focus on different theories of how people solve problems and how to communicate problems effectively. The second part of the course will focus on using empirical science to learn how to effectively use groups and teams to communicate, innovate, and make decisions. The third part of the course will focus more on applied decision-making and communication at the organizational level with an emphasis on networks of communication, nudging ethical behavior, and conflict. Case studies are used that incorporate organizational communication within workplace scenarios.

E P D 706 — CHANGE MANAGEMENT

1 credit.

Provides emerging and practicing professionals foundational knowledge sufficient to develop a change management strategy and implement it using proven processes and tools. Through this course, students will be better prepared to deliver effective organizational performance. The course applies contemporary concepts and methods in change management through student selected projects.

E P D 708 — CREATING BREAKTHROUGH INNOVATIONS

1 credit.

Innovation needs processes and methods. Innovation needs tools and frameworks. But, there is no ONE right process, method, tool, or framework. Those are very context sensitive to things such as company, industry, and culture. This course is not about those things. We need to be able to be problem definers and insight generators that can apply what we learn in the real world, creating solutions and processes not seen before.

E P D 710 — FOUNDATIONS OF ENGINEERING LEADERSHIP

2 credits.

Build the foundations for developing, refining and strengthening your effectiveness as a leader of engineering teams, projects, and organizations. Enhance your understanding of how to match your leadership style to a team's focus, organization and culture. Grow your understanding of your strengths and weaknesses as a leader using proven assessment tools. Develop your plan for growing your leadership competency through the rest of the Master of Engineering Management program and beyond.

E P D 712 — ETHICS FOR PROFESSIONALS

1 credit.

Explores how our actions affect others and influence the choices we make within the workplace. This course will enhance ethical competencies by giving students opportunities to discuss challenges to behavior and decision-making in different professional contexts.

E P D 713 — KEY LEGAL CONCEPTS FOR PROFESSIONALS

1 credit.

An introduction to basic legal concepts, sources, and reasoning. Laws affect all aspects of our lives. For people without legal training, though, the legal language, procedure, and argumentation is a bit bewildering. This course aims to demystify law by providing an introduction to basic legal concepts, an overview of several key substantive areas of law, and an explanation of ways in which law functions in professional practices. The course will be grounded in U.S. and closely related common law jurisdictions, but it will consider other legal systems and international law as well.

E P D 720 — ENGINE NOISE AND VIBRATION

2 credits.

Introduces the engineer to fundamental NVH (Noise, Vibration, and Harshness) concepts with an emphasis on how NVH can be integrated throughout the engine development process from initial concept inception through to validation testing for production.

E P D 730 — SUSTAINABLE FACILITIES

3 credits.

Explore the environmental impacts of commercial and residential buildings, including energy, water, materials, transportation, waste, human health, and land use. All phases of a building's life cycle will be considered, along with relevant case studies, benchmarking tools, public policies and emerging concepts.

E P D/​ACCT I S/​GEN BUS  781 — FINANCIAL AND BUSINESS ACUMEN

1 credit.

This course is designed with a keen awareness for the needs of the non-financial student or professional. For this class, no previous financial training is required. The intent is to equip you with the essential concepts used to develop financial literacy. Content will cover basic financial terms and reports, analytical tools to help interpret financial data and using financial data in budgets and forecasts. This course will not apply toward fulfilling the MBA degree requirements.

E P D/​GEN BUS/​MARKETNG  782 — MARKETING FOR NON-MARKETING PROFESSIONALS

1 credit.

An overview of marketing's role within an organization, the key elements of a marketing plan, and how the plan is implemented. Students will learn about buyer demographic, psychographic and purchasing decision behavior. A thorough understanding of the customer enables students to develop a coordinated marketing mix (product, price promotion and place) that will satisfy the customer better than the competition and at the required margin. Students will leave the course understanding the degree to which all company functions must be coordinated and focused on the customer. This course will not apply toward fulfilling the MBA degree requirements.

E P D/​GEN BUS/​M H R  783 — LEADING TEAMS

1 credit.

Students will gain the knowledge and skills to continuously enhance their own team performance and productivity as well as the teams they are involved with. They will also be in a much better position to lead teams effectively. This course will not apply toward fulfilling the MBA degree requirements.

E P D/​GEN BUS/​OTM  784 — PROJECT MANAGEMENT ESSENTIALS

1 credit.

This project management course teaches techniques that will help you plan, execute, and deliver projects with desired scope on time and on budget. Learn to document clear project objectives and goals, accurately estimate project time and costs, schedule and allocate time-critical resources, and establish feedback systems for optimal project control. This course will not apply toward fulfilling the MBA degree requirements.

E P D/​GEN BUS/​M H R  785 — EFFECTIVE NEGOTIATION STRATEGIES

1 credit.

This course aims at improving students' negotiating skills, doing so by providing a theoretical underpinning that will help them to understand the sources of effective and ineffective approaches to negotiations. This course will not apply toward fulfilling the MBA degree requirements.