M E 1 — COOPERATIVE EDUCATION PROGRAM

1 credit.

Work experience which combines classroom theory with practical knowledge of operations to provide students with a background upon which to base a professional career in industry.

M E 151 — INTRODUCTION TO MECHANICAL ENGINEERING

2 credits.

Introduction to the field of Mechanical Engineering through problem-solving in the context of small group projects. Fabricate, build, and test prototypes. Introduction to computer software of particular relevance to Mechanical Engineers.

M E 160 — ARCHITECTURAL GRAPHICS

3 credits.

The skill of communicating through the graphic media of freehand and instrumental drawing. Architectural presentation, isometric, perspective and shades and shadows.

M E 170 — CIVIL ENGINEERING GRAPHICS

2 credits.

To develop an awareness of and appreciation for work that is characteristic of civil engineering. Graphical communication including lettering, drawing equipment and techniques; geometric construction, orthographic projections, pictorial drawing, and technical sketching, isometric, oblique and perspective projections, descriptive geometry, computer-aided design drawing, applications to civil engineering problems.

M E 201 — INTRODUCTION TO MECHANICAL ENGINEERING

3 credits.

Provides an introduction to the field of Mechanical Engineering in the context of a major, semester-long project that is carried out in small groups as well as several, smaller hands-on projects during the semester. Students will obtain a shop pass, design build and test small prototypes using the shop as well as 3-D printing, take measurements using various instruments, and use a microcontroller to control a system. Students will be introduced to software that is particularly useful to Mechanical Engineers including SolidWorks and EES. Students will learn how to design experiments, obtain data, use data to develop simple models of systems, exercise models for the purposes of design, and present their results professionally. It will provide a context for the math, physics and chemistry classes that are taken during the first year of the Mechanical Engineering curriculum and also provide a preview of future ME courses and should also give you a glimpse into the breadth of opportunities afforded by a mechanical engineering degree.

M E 231 — INTRODUCTORY ENGINEERING GRAPHICS

2 credits.

A freshman level course which provides the undergraduate engineering student with a background in descriptive geometry, orthographic projection, engineering drawing standards and annotation, and computer-aided engineering graphics. Point line and plane relationships in projection; multi-view engineering drawings; auxiliary and section views; basic dimensioning and annotation; engineering applications. Open to Fr

M E 240 — DYNAMICS

3 credits.

Rectilinear and curvilinear motion of a particle; force, mass, acceleration; work, potential, and kinetic energy; impulse and momentum; kinematics of rigid bodies; moving coordinate systems with relative motion; general planar rigid body kinematics and kinetics. Applications to linkages, cams and geared systems.

M E 273 — ENGINEERING PROBLEM SOLVING WITH EES

1 credit.

This course will serve the dual purpose of providing students with a high level of proficiency in the Engineering Equation Solver software as well as giving students the opportunity to solve high-level engineering problems using this tool. Students leaving the course will have a very solid understanding of equation solving software including advanced features that would not be covered in any other class on campus. Students will also get another opportunity to apply sophisticated computing tools to engineering applications.

M E 291 — UNGERGRADUATE MECHANICAL ENGINEERING PROJECTS

1-3 credits.

Individual lab projects under staff supervision.

M E 299 — INDEPENDENT STUDY

1-3 credits.

M E 306 — MECHANICS OF MATERIALS

3 credits.

Mechanical stress and strain, deformation under tension and compression, torsion of shafts, beam bending stresses and deflections, design of beams and shafts, pressure vessels, principal stress and strain, buckling, impact, strain energy analysis.

M E/​E M A  307 — MECHANICS OF MATERIALS LAB

1 credit.

Data processing, tension/compression tests, creep stress concentrations, fatigue, fracture, composite materials, combined stress, beam flexure, dynamic loads, buckling.

M E 313 — MANUFACTURING PROCESSES

3 credits.

A quantitative and qualitative study of manufacturing processes including machining, forming; welding, and casting for metals; and extrusion, injection molding, thermoforming, and blow molding for plastics. Emphasis on process selection for optimum design. Laboratory experiments and demonstrations. Quality, strength, and economic evaluations.

M E 314 — MANUFACTURING FUNDAMENTALS

3 credits.

An introduction to techniques for modeling in materials processing and improving decision making in increasing the productivity of design and manufacturing processes. Quality improvement and engineering simulation tools are presented as well as the methods of engineering economy and the role of manufacturing automation and systems, through lectures and laboratories.

M E 331 — GEOMETRIC MODELING FOR ENGINEERING APPLICATIONS

3 credits.

A junior level course introduces undergraduate engineering students to fundamental concepts in geometric modeling of engineering form, and computer-aided design of shapes, components, and assemblies. Lectures are reinforced by the laboratory experience where students operate modern commercial computer-aided design systems to model and to learn the basics of engineering communication, specification, and annotation.

M E 340 — INTRODUCTION TO DYNAMIC SYSTEMS

3 credits.

Mathematical modeling and analysis of dynamic systems with mechanical, thermal, and fluid elements. Topics: time domain solutions, analog computer simulation, linearization techniques, block diagram representation, numerical methods and frequency domain solutions.

M E 342 — DESIGN OF MACHINE ELEMENTS

3 credits.

Analysis and design of machine elements and machines; loads, stresses, deflections, material selection, fatigue failure, finite elements; mechanical power transmission components including gearing, bearings, shafting, and frictional devices.

M E 349 — ENGINEERING DESIGN PROJECTS

3 credits.

Applied engineering design projects. Emphasis on design of practical mechanical engineering systems, devices and/or components. Two 2-hr labs and one lecture per week. Lecture focuses on the design process, creativity, patents, and other applications to practical problems.

M E 351 — INTERDISCIPLINARY EXPERIENTIAL DESIGN PROJECTS I

3 credits.

First of a two-course sequence in which students design and fabricate systems and devices, typically having an interdisciplinary aspect. In the first course, emphasis will be on project planning, team dynamics, problem identification, and conceptual design and evaluation.

M E 352 — INTERDISCIPLINARY EXPERIENTIAL DESIGN PROJECTS II

3 credits.

Second of a two-course sequence in which students design and fabricate systems and devices, typically having an interdisciplinary aspect. In the second course, emphasis will be on detailed design, fabrication, testing, and modification of concepts developed in the previous course.

M E 361 — THERMODYNAMICS

3 credits.

First and second laws of thermodynamics; thermodynamic properties of gases, vapors, and gas-vapor mixtures; energy-systems analysis including power cycles, refrigeration cycles and air-conditioning processes. Introduction to thermodynamics of reacting mixtures.

M E 363 — FLUID DYNAMICS

3 credits.

Laws of mechanics and thermodynamics applied to fluids at rest and in motion; potential flow; dimensional analysis; viscous flow; pipe flow; boundary-layer theory; compressible flow.

M E 364 — ELEMENTARY HEAT TRANSFER

3 credits.

Fundamental concepts of conduction, convection, radiation. Heat-exchanger principles.

M E 368 — ENGINEERING MEASUREMENTS AND INSTRUMENTATION

4 credits.

Theory of modern instrumentation, the design and execution of experiments and the analysis of experimental data. Laboratory provides direct experience with concepts in the context of experimental design for hypothesis testing, for product evaluation and for control system design.

M E 370 — ENERGY SYSTEMS LABORATORY

3 credits.

Experimental evaluation and analysis of performance of various energy conversion systems such as turbines, compressors, refrigerators, fans, and internal combustion engines.

M E 379 — MECHANICAL DISSECTION

1 credit.

Laboratory examination of the design of pumps, turbines, engines, heat-exchangers, household appliances, and other mechanical equipment. Operational design materials, manufacturing, failure and marketing considerations.

M E/​B M E  415 — BIOMECHANICS OF HUMAN MOVEMENT

3 credits.

An overview of experimental and modeling techniques used to study human movement. Specific topics will include locomotion, motion capture systems, force plates, muscle mechanics, musculoskeletal modeling, three dimensional kinematics, inverse dynamics, forward dynamic simulation and imaging based biomechanics. Homework and laboratory activities will be conducted that emphasize applications of movement biomechanics in orthopedics and rehabilitation. The course will culminate in a class project related to each student's research interests.

M E 417 — INTRODUCTION TO POLYMER PROCESSING

3 credits.

Description of the physical, thermal, mechanical, and rheological properties of polymeric materials relevant to their processing behavior. Review of the basic transport phenomena equations: mass, momentum, and energy. Analysis of various processing operations for the manufacture of polymeric articles, with particular emphasis on: extrusion, injection molding, blow molding, thermoforming, and compression molding. Discussion of plastics recycling issues.

M E 418 — ENGINEERING DESIGN WITH POLYMERS

3 credits.

Implications for plastics part design of polymer classification, structure, melt rheology, mixing, polymer blends, anisotropy, solidification, mechanical behavior, failure. Plastics design for electrical, optical, acoustic and barrier properties.

M E 419 — FUNDAMENTALS OF INJECTION MOLDING

3 credits.

All major aspects of injection molding with emphases on design, processing, process physics, computer-aided engineering (CAE), troubleshooting, and advanced molding processes. Field trip, video presentation, case studies, term project with oral presentation, and hands-on sessions using commercial CAE simuulation software.

M E 420 — INTRODUCTION TO POLYMER COMPOSITES PROCESSING

3 credits.

A brief description of the physical, thermal, rheological and mechanical properties of composite materials. Apply fundamental transport phenomena concepts to solve problems dealing with flow through porous media, fiber orientation, curing reactions, shrinkage and warpage and mechanics of composites. Introduction of various processing operations for the manufacture of composites products, with particular emphasis on resin transfer molding, vacuum assisted resin infusion, injection and compression molding, filament winding, braiding and pultrusion. The course includes laboratory experiments, CAE applied to composites product design, and a final group project producing a composites product.

M E/​STAT  424 — STATISTICAL EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN

3 credits.

This course provides a systematic introduction to statistical design and analysis of experiments. Topics include: principles of randomization, blocking and replication, randomized blocking designs, Latin square designs, full factorial and fractional factorial designs and response surface methodology. Substantial focus will be devoted to engineering applications.

M E/​CBE/​CHEM/​E M A  425 — UNDERGRADUATE RHEOLOGY SEMINAR

1 credit.

Rheology seminar course encouraged for all interested in professions related to polymers, suspensions or rheology; will not count toward credit requirement of the major.

M E 429 — METAL CUTTING

3 credits.

Theory and applications of metal cutting; basic principles; significant features of current research. Chip formation mechanics, three-dimensional machining operations, tool life and machinability, economics of metal removal, and precision engineering.

M E/​M S & E  435 — JOINING OF MATERIALS: STRUCTURAL, ELECTRONIC, BIO AND NANO MATERIALS

3 credits.

Structural (metallic, ceramic, plastic, composite): welding, soldering, brazing, diffusion bonding, adhesive bonding. Electronic: wave and reflow soldering; wire, flip-chip and wafer bonding. Bio: hip and knee implants; dental restorations and implants; medical devices. Nano: nano tubes, wires, fibers and composites.

M E 437 — ADVANCED MATERIALS SELECTION

3 credits.

A structured approach is developed to address the complex problem of materials selection in design where multiple constraints and conflicting objectives need to be considered. Topics include: introductory fracture mechanics; corrosion and corrosion mitigation; effects of manufacturing processes and process selection; property development in metals, ceramics, polymers and composites; and material analysis techniques.

M E/​E C E  439 — INTRODUCTION TO ROBOTICS

3 credits.

Hands-on introduction to key concepts and tools underpinning robotic systems in use and development today. Intended to give students the tools to understand robotic systems, to explore robotics for their own purposes, and to pursue advanced study in the field. Students are expected to have familiarity with a high level programming language such as Python (recommended), MATLAB, Java or Julia.

M E 440 — INTERMEDIATE VIBRATIONS

3 credits.

Harmonic motion; natural frequencies and vibration of damped and undamped single and multi-degree of freedom systems; modal analysis; influence coefficients; lumped-mass modeling; dynamic load factors; Rayleigh's method; flow-induced vibrations; shaft whirl; balancing; vibration absorbers and tuned mass dampers; finite element modeling.

M E/​BSE/​FOOD SCI  441 — RHEOLOGY OF FOODS AND BIOMATERIALS

3 credits.

Fundamentals of rheology and rheological evaluations of food and biomaterials; structure-function relationships.

M E 444 — DESIGN PROBLEMS IN ELASTICITY

3 credits.

Analysis of elastic systems by strain-energy techniques. Determination of stresses and deflections in statically indeterminate structures encountered in design. Resilience in springs.

M E 445 — MECHATRONICS IN CONTROL & PRODUCT REALIZATION

3 credits.

The course will cover fundamentals of electromechanical control systems with a focus on subsystem design impacts at the system level. Students will learn how to integrate microcontrollers into products for control and/or instrumentation and learn how to create intelligent interfaces. * Motor sensor interfaces * C programming * Control computer system architecture * Software and hardware principles for computer control The following experience would be extremely advantageous to have coming in but in not assumed: Experience designing/fabricating/debugging digital circuits and active/passive analog circuits. Experience in any function based programming language (Matlab/Python/Java/C/C++). Experience with Electrical Mechanical CAD tools (Altium Designer etc./ Solidworks etc.).

M E 446 — AUTOMATIC CONTROLS

3 credits.

Sequencing control. Theory of linear feedback control systems with illustrative examples taken from applications encountered by mechanical engineers; differential equations for defining dynamic system response, Laplace transforms, and transient and frequency response concepts.

M E 447 — COMPUTER CONTROL OF MACHINES AND PROCESSES

3 credits.

Discrete control theory reduced to engineering practice through a comprehensive study of discrete system modeling, system identification and digital controller design. Selected industrial processes and machines utilized as subjects on which computer control is to be implemented. Focus: computer control economics and planning as well as the control theory and programming.

M E 448 — MECHANICAL SYSTEMS ANALYSIS

3 credits.

Integrated treatment of mathematical modeling and analysis of mechanical systems. Modeling of linear and nonlinear systems and their performance under transient, periodic and random loads.

M E 449 — REDESIGN AND PROTOTYPE FABRICATION

3 credits.

The focal point of all lectures and labs is a semester long project. Lectures cover principals of design, manufacturing and prototype evaluation. Students will perform a re-design of a thermo-mechanical device using knowledge/skills acquired both through this course and previous course offerings in thermal sciences, mechanics and dynamics, manufacturing, and design. The lab component provides students with instruction and hands-on experience using the manufacturing tools/processes available in the College of Engineering. In addition, during the lab the students will apply the concepts of the lectures to the fabrication of the semester project. Each student constructs his or her own device during the course of the semester. This course provides a complete engineering experience by combining design, dimensioning and tolerancing, manufacturing and quantitative analysis in a single semester project.

M E 450 — DESIGN AND DYNAMICS OF VEHICLES

3 credits.

Dynamic modelling of vehicles, tire mechanics, suspension kinematics, vehicle stability, vehicle structural design criteria, vehicle vibrations and ride criteria, design considerations for vehicles.

M E 451 — KINEMATICS AND DYNAMICS OF MACHINE SYSTEMS

3 credits.

Graphical, analytical, and computer methods for the kinematic and dynamic analysis of mechanical linkages, mechanisms, and geared and cam systems.

M E 460 — APPLIED THERMAL / STRUCTURAL FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS

3 credits.

The course is designed for undergraduate students with no finite element (FE) analysis experience or knowledge. By the end of the semester the student will be able to simulate 1D, 2D and 3D structural and thermal systems, including both the static and transient response, using a common, commercially available FE software package. Analyses will be performed using both GUI and APDL. The emphasis of the course is on becoming proficient with the software and capable of operating an FE package at a high level, including benchmarking and verifying the FE model using simple analytical checks. An additional emphasis of the course is on understanding the impact of the temperature distribution in an object on the stress field through thermal expansion.

M E 461 — THERMAL SYSTEMS MODELING

3 credits.

Analysis and design of engineering systems involving applications of thermodynamics, economics, heat transfer, and fluid flow.

M E/​M S & E  462 — WELDING METALLURGY

3 credits.

Metallurgical principles applied to welding; mechanisms of strengthening, phase equilibria, and microstructure of the weld zone. Modern processes including laser and electron beam welding.

M E 466 — AIR POLLUTION EFFECTS, MEASUREMENTS AND CONTROL

3 credits.

Overview of human health and environmental effects, and legislation regarding air pollution. Atmospheric transport and transformation of air pollutants. Emissions of air pollutants from power plants, transportation and industrial sources. Control technology for particulate and gaseous emissions. Monitoring and measurement of air pollutants. Application to boilers, engines, industrial processes and solid waste-to-energy technology.

M E 469 — INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES

3 credits.

Fundamental principles of engine operation and application including cycle analysis, gas analysis, effect of operating conditions and engine design on air pollution.

M E/​BSE  475 — ENGINEERING PRINCIPLES OF AGRICULTURAL MACHINERY

3 credits.

Engineering design principles of machines for the production, processing and handling of crops for food, fuel, bio-mass and fiber. Environmental and biological factors that influence machine design and operation. Economic and capacity analysis of machines and systems.

M E/​BSE  476 — ENGINEERING PRINCIPLES OF OFF-ROAD VEHICLES

3 credits.

Engineering design principles of heavy-duty vehicles intended for off-road use: fuels, engine cycles, engine principles and construction, clutches, mechanical and hydrostatic transmissions, final drives, traction systems, traction modeling, dynamic behavior, suspension systems and braking.

M E 489 — HONORS IN RESEARCH

1-3 credits.

Undergraduate honors research projects supervised by faculty members.

M E 491 — MECHANICAL ENGINEERING PROJECTS I

1-3 credits.

Individual lab projects under staff supervision.

M E 492 — MECHANICAL ENGINEERING PROJECTS II

1-3 credits.

Continuation of 491.

M E/​CIV ENGR./​E M A  508 — COMPOSITE MATERIALS

3 credits.

Physical properties and mechanical behavior of polymer, metal, ceramic, cementitious, cellulosic and biological composite systems; micro- and macro-mechanics; lamination and strength analyses; static and transient loading; fabrication; recycling; design; analytical-experimental correlation; applications.

M E/​I SY E  510 — FACILITIES PLANNING

3 credits.

Introduction to plant location theory and analysis of models of plant location; models for determining plant size and time phasing; line balancing models; techniques for investigating conveyor and other material handling problems; and models of plant layout.

M E/​I SY E  512 — INSPECTION, QUALITY CONTROL AND RELIABILITY

3 credits.

Inspection data for quality control; sampling plans for acceptance inspection; charts for process control. Introduction to reliability models and acceptance testing.

M E/​I SY E  513 — ANALYSIS OF CAPITAL INVESTMENTS

3 credits.

A second course in quantitative methods for analyzing capital investments in technological environments, both public and private. Replacement models; comparison of alternative investment models; risk analysis; case studies.

M E 514 — ADDITIVE MANUFACTURING

3 credits.

Rapid prototyping (RP) has emerged as a popular manufacturing technology to accelerate product creation. This novel manufacturing technology enables the building of parts that have traditionally been impossible to fabricate because of their complex shapes and the variety in materials.

M E/​N E  520 — TWO-PHASE FLOW AND HEAT TRANSFER

3 credits.

Two-phase flow and heat transfer in engineering systems. Pool boiling and flow boiling. Phenomenological modeling.

M E/​CBE  525 — MACROMOLECULAR HYDRODYNAMICS

3 credits.

Observed phenomena in polymeric flow systems. Techniques of viscometry and viscoelastic measurements for polymeric fluids. Rheological models. Analytical solutions to flow problems: non-Newtonian viscosity, linear viscoelasticity, normal stresses, recoil, stress relaxation, etc. Dimensional analysis. Unit operations of the polymer industry: extrusion, blow molding, injection molding, mixing.

M E/​COMP SCI/​E C E  532 — THEORY AND APPLICATIONS OF PATTERN RECOGNITION

3 credits.

Pattern recognition systems and components; decision theories and classification; discriminant functions; supervised and unsupervised training; clustering; feature extraction and dimensional reduction; sequential and hierarchical classification; applications of training, feature extraction, and decision rules to engineering problems.

M E 535 — COMPUTER-AIDED GEOMETRIC DESIGN

3 credits.

This course is designed to acquaint the student with computer-aided design technology used for geometric design of mechanical product. Currently used methods of creating three-dimensional computer-aided design (CAD) models will be discussed. The papadigms of three-dimensional wire-frame modeling, surface modeling and solids modeling as applied in product design will be taught. The course will be project oriented and will emphasize building and querying CAD models.

M E/​COMP SCI/​E C E  539 — INTRODUCTION TO ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORK AND FUZZY SYSTEMS

3 credits.

Theory and applications of artificial neural networks and fuzzy logic: multi-layer perceptron, self-organization map, radial basis network, Hopfield network, recurrent network, fuzzy set theory, fuzzy logic control, adaptive fuzzy neural network, genetic algorithm, and evolution computing. Applications to control, pattern recognition, nonlinear system modeling, speech and image processing.

M E/​E M A  540 — EXPERIMENTAL VIBRATION AND DYNAMIC SYSTEM ANALYSIS

3 credits.

Application of digital data aquisition to the investigation of mechanical components, structures and systems using time histories, transforms and response functions to characterize free, forced and transient inputs. Introduction to sensors, instrumentation and methods appropriate for dynamic system response.

M E 545 — FLUID POWER

3 credits.

Generation, transmission, and utilization of power in systems in which the working fluid is oil or air; analysis and evaluation of pumps, motors, valves, and other fluid components; dynamic analysis and control of fluid power systems.

M E 549 — PRODUCT DESIGN

3 credits.

A project oriented, interdisciplinary course with an emphasis on designing competitive, quality products. The product development process is covered from problem identification through detail design and evaluation. Included among the topics covered are: idea generation and evaluation, visualization, and quality.

M E/​COMP SCI/​I SY E  558 — INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTATIONAL GEOMETRY

3 credits.

Introduction to fundamental geometric computations and algorithms, and their use for solving engineering and scientific problems. Computer representations of simple geometric objects and paradigms for algorithm design. Applications from areas of engineering analysis, design and manufacturing, biology, statistics, and other sciences.

M E 561 — INTERMEDIATE THERMODYNAMICS

3 credits.

Fundamentals; phase and chemical equilibria; availability; thermodynamic relationships.

M E 563 — INTERMEDIATE FLUID DYNAMICS

3 credits.

Incompressible and compressible, laminar and turbulent flow of fluids. Classical and finite-difference analysis using differential and integral formulation of the continuity, momentum and energy equations. Application to ducts, plates, spheres, blades, pumps, turbines, lubrication, shockwaves, nozzles, diffusers and other mechanical engineering equipment.

M E 564 — HEAT TRANSFER

3 credits.

Applications of conduction, convection, and thermal-radiation principles to combined-mode problems; analytical and numerical techniques; heat-exchanger design; thermal stresses.

M E/​N E  565 — POWER PLANT TECHNOLOGY

3 credits.

Design and performance of power plants for the generation of electric power; fossil and nuclear fuels, cycle analysis, component design and performance, plant operation, control, economics and environmental impact. Advanced concepts.

M E/​E P  566 — CRYOGENICS

3 credits.

Applications of cryogenics, material properties at low temperatures, refrigeration and liquifaction systems, measurement techniques, insulation, storage and transfer of cryogenics, safety and handling.

M E/​CBE  567 — SOLAR ENERGY TECHNOLOGY

3 credits.

Radiant energy transfer and its application to solar exchangers; energy balances for solar exchangers, review of theory, economics, and practice of solar energy applications.

M E 569 — APPLIED COMBUSTION

3 credits.

Introduction to and analysis of combustion processes and combustion technology for gaseous, liquid, and solid fuels. Application to combustion engines, furnaces, fixed-bed, fluidized-bed, and suspension burning boilers.

M E/​E M A  570 — EXPERIMENTAL MECHANICS

3 credits.

Experimental methods for design and analysis of mechanical components, structures and materials. Electrically and optically recorded stress, strain and deformation data; computer aquisition/reduction/presentat techniques; applications to static and transient events, sensors, transducer design, NDT, fracture and residual stresses.

M E 572 — INTERMEDIATE GAS DYNAMICS

3 credits.

Thermodynamics and fluid dynamics of compressible gas flows with friction and heat transfer, and application to nozzles, shock tubes and propulsion devises. Wave phenomena and engine port tuning. Physics of high temperature gases and equilibrium, non-equilibrium and frozen flows.

M E 573 — COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS

3 credits.

Course provides an in-depth introduction to the methods and analysis techniques used in computational solutions of fluid mechanics and heat transfer problems. Model problems are used to study the interaction of physical processes and numerical techniques. Contemporary methods for boundary layers, incompressible viscous flows, and inviscid compressible flows are studied. Finite differences and finite volume techniques are emphasized.

M E/​E C E  577 — AUTOMATIC CONTROLS LABORATORY

4 credits.

Control theory is reduced to engineering practice through the analysis and design of actual systems in the laboratory. Experiments are conducted with modern servo systems using both analog and digital control. Systems identification and modern controls design are applied to motion and torque control.

M E 601 — SPECIAL TOPICS IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING

1-3 credits.

Such as vibrations, balancing, lubrication and wear, special manufacturing processes, automation, energy systems, etc.

M E/​B M E  603 — TOPICS IN BIO-MEDICAL ENGINEERING

1-3 credits.

Various aspects of living systems of interest to the mechanical engineer, such as the mechanics of hearing and vision, cardiac and central nervous systems, artificial organs, blood flow behavior, and energy-transfer processes.

M E/​I SY E  641 — DESIGN AND ANALYSIS OF MANUFACTURING SYSTEMS

3 credits.

Covers a broad range of techniques and tools relevant to the design, analysis, development, implementation, operation and control of modern manufacturing systems. Case studies assignments using industry data will be used to elaborate the practical applications of the theoretical concepts. This course also serves as a capstone course for the MSMSE degree.

M E/​I SY E  643 — PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS OF MANUFACTURING SYSTEMS

3 credits.

This course examines the state of the art in the use of stochastic network theory to develop performance models of modern manufacturing systems.

M E 699 — ADVANCED INDEPENDENT STUDY

1-3 credits.

M E 702 — GRADUATE COOPERATIVE EDUCATION PROGRAM

1-2 credits.

Work experience that combines classroom theory with practical knowledge of operations to provide students with a background on which to develop and enhance a professional career. The work experience is tailored for MS students from within the U.S. as well as eligible international students.

M E/​E M A  706 — PLATES, SHELLS AND PRESSURE VESSELS

3 credits.

Stress and deflection analysis of structural plates and membranes under mechanical and thermal loads; variational and numerical methods; instability and vibrations; membrane shell theory; cylindrical shells; pressure vessel and piping design applications; ASME Pressure Vessel Code.

M E/​E M A  708 — ADVANCED COMPOSITE MATERIALS

3 credits.

Contemporary topics such as new materials; smart materials/structures/systems; fatigue; fracture; experimental techniques; nondestructive evaluation; transient, micro, three-dimensional, nonlinear, inelastic and environmental effects; manufacturing methods: repair and applications.

M E 714 — ADVANCED MATERIALS PROCESSING AND MANUFACTURING

3 credits.

Discusses the systematic integration of processing-material-performance relationships in various advanced materials processing and manufacturing processes.

M E 717 — ADVANCED POLYMER PROCESSING

3 credits.

Advanced analysis and modeling of plastics extrusion, injection molding, and other processes; mold and equipment design; materials consideration.

M E 718 — MODELING AND SIMULATION IN POLYMER PROCESSING

3 credits.

This course is designed to acquaint the student with computer simulation technology used for the engineering of polymer processes.

M E/​E M A  722 — INTRODUCTION TO POLYMER RHEOLOGY

3 credits.

Formulation of constitutive equations using embedded base vectors. Viscosity, normal stress differences, stress relaxation, elastic recoil. Polymer rheology; homogeneous strain history.

M E/​E C E  739 — ADVANCED ROBOTICS

3 credits.

In-depth study of advanced robotics modeling and control. Topics include kinematics, motion planning, dynamics and control of serial chain robotic manipulators. Concepts are explored through a combination of theoretical and numerical modeling techniques.

M E 740 — ADVANCED VIBRATIONS

3 credits.

Vibration of mechanical components subject to dynamic loads; analytical, numerical and finite element methods applied to the analysis and design of mechanical systems consisting of cables, bars, shafts, beams, frames, rings, membranes, plates and shells.

M E 746 — DYNAMICS OF CONTROLLED SYSTEMS

3 credits.

Emphasis on obtaining equations which define the behavior of physical systems frequently subjected to control; mechanical processing, fluid power, and thermal systems; analytical, experimental, and computer techniques.

M E 747 — ADVANCED COMPUTER CONTROL OF MACHINES AND PROCESSES

3 credits.

Digital control theory, design methodology, and techniques for controller imple mentation on digital computers. Advanced single and multi-axis motion generati on algorithms. Multiple processor control systems. Multiple objective control systems for machinery guidance and manufacturing processes. Precision control.

M E 748 — OPTIMUM DESIGN OF MECHANICAL ELEMENTS AND SYSTEMS

3 credits.

Formulation and solution of mechanical design problems by use of mathematical programming methods.

M E 751 — MATRIX METHODS IN THE DESIGN AND ANALYSIS OF MECHANISMS

3 credits.

An integrated approach to kinematic, static, and dynamic analysis of mechanical linkages based on the application of transformation matrices. Applications to planar and spatial mechanisms. Numerical methods of solution. Introduction to synthesis and optimization of linkages using transformation matrices.

M E 753 — FRICTION, LUBRICATION AND WEAR

3 credits.

Behavior of frictional surfaces under different types of loading. Mechanisms of heat generation and surface damage (wear, scuffing, pitting, fretting, etc.). Rheological effects. Effect of lubrication. Surface interaction in metal cutting. Design considerations.

M E 758 — SOLID MODELING

3 credits.

Mathematical modeling, computer representations, and algorithms for manipulation of two- and three-dimensional solid objects on a computer. Applications of solid modeling to design, representation, and analysis of mechanical parts and processes; other engineering and scientific applications of solid modeling.

M E/​COMP SCI/​E C E/​E M A/​E P  759 — HIGH PERFORMANCE COMPUTING FOR APPLICATIONS IN ENGINEERING

3 credits.

An overview of hardware and software solutions that enable the use of advanced computing in tackling computationally intensive Engineering problems. Hands-on learning promoted through programming assignments that leverage emerging hardware architectures and use parallel computing programming languages. Students are strongly encourage to have completed COMP SCI 367 or COMP SCI 400 or to have equivalent experience.

M E 761 — TOPICS IN THERMODYNAMICS

3 credits.

Thermostatic behavior of nonideal gases; equations of state, with emphasis on their empirical and statistical development, including mixture rules; more detailed study of chemical and phase equilibrium; selected applications of the foregoing; real gas processes, combustion, direct energy conversion devices.

M E 764 — ADVANCED HEAT TRANSFER I-CONDUCTION

3 credits.

Analytical methods in conduction; Bessel functions, separation of variables, Laplace transforms, superposition, oscillating solutions; computer methods; finite differences, finite elements.

M E 765 — ADVANCED HEAT TRANSFER II-CONVECTION

3 credits.

Convection and mass-transfer principles, including boundary-layer phenomena in laminar and turbulent flow; internal flows; heat transfer in high-velocity flow, numerical methods.

M E 769 — COMBUSTION PROCESSES

3 credits.

Combustion theory and practice. Thermodynamics of combustion, flame theory, detonation, spray and droplet combustion related to various engine applications.

M E 770 — ADVANCED EXPERIMENTAL INSTRUMENTATION

3 credits.

Theory and design of instruments for transient physical phenomena especially related to internal combustion engines.

M E 773 — BOUNDARY LAYER THEORY

3 credits.

Concepts of laminar and turbulent flow. Boundary-layer approximations. Similarity and integral methods of solution. Internal flows, flow over surfaces, jets, rotating elements, and the effects of compressibility.

M E 774 — CHEM KINETICS OF COMBUST SYSTEMS

3 credits.

Application of gas-phase chemical reaction rate theory to power and propulsion systems, both earthbound and airborne. Aerothermochemistry, kinetics of combustion reactions, kinetics related to air pollutant generation. Development and comparison of transition state theory, collision theory and bond-energy-bond-order method.

M E 775 — TURBULENT HEAT AND MOMENTUM TRANSFER

3 credits.

Stochastic methods in turbulent heat and momentum transfer; fully developed turbulence; numerical methods including model applications to boundary layers, reacting flows, mass transfer, and unsteady flows; linear and non-linear stability and transition; emphasis on applications of interest to Mechanical Engineers.

M E/​E P  777 — VACUUM TECHNOLOGY

3 credits.

Topics defining modern vacuum technology, including the kinetic theory of gases, conductance, pumping systems, pump technologies, pressure measurement, gas-surface interactions, sealing technologies, leak detection, and residual gas analysis will be addressed through a combination of lectures, laboratory activities, problem solving, and group discussions.

M E 790 — MASTER'S RESEARCH AND THESIS

1-9 credits.

M E/​E M A  825 — MOLECULAR NETWORK THEORIES FOR POLYMERIC MATERIALS

3 credits.

Stress-strain-birefringence relations for rubber-like solid derived from "Gaussian' network model. Birefringence theory from Maxwell's equations. Temporary-junction networks: constitutive equations for concentrated polymer solutions and molten polymers.

M E 890 — PHD RESEARCH AND THESIS

1-9 credits.

M E 903 — GRADUATE SEMINAR

0 credits.

M E/​CBE/​CHEM/​E M A  925 — RHEOLOGY RESEARCH SEMINAR

1 credit.

Exploration of the most recent research literature on viscoelasticity, constitutive equations, non-Newtonian flow systems, fluid metering devices, kinetic theory of macromolecules, and rheooptical phenomena. Periodic reports on recent advances made by research workers in the various rheology groups on the Madison campus.

M E 964 — SPECIAL ADVANCED TOPICS IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING

1-3 credits.

Advanced topics in design, manufacturing, energy, etc.

M E 990 — DISSERTATOR RESEARCH AND THESIS

1-9 credits.

M E 999 — ADVANCED INDEPENDENT STUDY

1-5 credits.